Thyroid Levels Tsh 3rd Generation

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What does this mean when talking about the thyroid?
    Ok, my son who is almost 20 months old has an underactive thyroid. He was born with it. Anyhow, he has to have blood work done every 3 months to check his thyroid levels. The 2 things they check are his Free T4 level and his TSH Level. Anyhow, they usually give me a print out with his levels on it and on the chart they list the TSH level as TSH-3rd generation. What does the 3rd generation part mean? I don't understand that. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Third generation TSH refers to the laboratory test that measures the amount of TSH in blood even at very low concentrations. Basically it is the third time the test has been refined, to make it more accurate.

  2. QUESTION:
    Should I be worried about my Thyroid Peroxidase ABS levels?
    I went to get my yearly blood tests done and my Thyroid Peroxidase ABS (TPO) Level is 184 H normal range is 0-60. Should I be worried? What does this mean anyways? My doctor wasnt overly concerned... Any advice would be helpful! my TSH 3rd Generation was normal Free T3 NOrmal and Free T4 normal.

    • ANSWER:
      It means that you might have a thyroid autoimmune condition in which your immune system attacks your thyroid gland. It's actually pretty common. It's not something to worry about a lot. But what will likely happen is that eventually, your thyroid gland will not work as well as it used to and then you'll have to take thyroid hormone supplements. Right now, though, your thyroid hormone levels are normal, so you're fine. You should get your thyroid tested at your annual medical exams.

  3. QUESTION:
    Is there a single medication that can help both depression and high blood pressure?
    I also have anxiety and it would be nice if there was one med for all instead of 2 to 3 different ones.

    • ANSWER:
      Yep. The answer is thyroid medication (not Synthroid). Has been used for all three symptoms for over a 100 years. The thyroid function tests are useless so most people with hypothyroidism are undiagnosed and walking around with fatigue, high blood pressure, DEPRESSION, weigh gain, dry skin, puffiness, high cholesterol, but their doc says their tests are "normal". Find someone who treats to symptoms not blood tests. Good Luck.

      Myth #1: The TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) blood test is the only way to diagnose hypothyroidism/low thyroid.

      Facts: First, there is no perfect test in medicine—not the TSH or any other. Second, nearly a century before the TSH test was developed, doctors made the diagnosis of hypothyroidism without any tests at all. They listened to their patients and examined them. Since then, there have been many tests that have been blindly followed until they proved to be unreliable and were discarded.

      To this day, there are at least three types of hypothyroidism for which the TSH test does not even test. The TSH is not a useful test for hypothyroidism caused by dysfunction of the pituitary gland or of the hypothalamus (part of the brain,) or for hypothyroidism caused by "tissue resistance" to the effects of thyroid hormone.

      My conclusion: The TSH test can miss the diagnosis of hypothy-
      roidism. To most accurately identify hypothyroidism, I start with the approach that has worked for over a century. I listen to the patient and look for evidence of low thyroid function. If the patient appears hypothyroid, I order blood tests including the TSH, but I also (1) check basal body temperature,1 and (2) check the urine thyroid hormone levels.2 I then interpret all test results in the context of the
      individual patient.

      Myth #2: Normalizing the TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) blood test is the best way to treat hypothyroidism.

      Fact:Many studies have shown adjusting thyroid doses to normalize the TSH blood test leaves many patients with symptoms of low thyroid. World-renowned thyroid specialist, Sir Anthony Toft, MD, discussed this sad fact in 2002. In a speech to the British Endocrine Society, Dr. Toft reviewed some of the evidence that demonstrated that the modern TSH-centered approach was ineffective. He concluded, "...the treatment of hypothyroidism is about to come full circle"—going back to the approach that worked so well before all of our modern tests and treatments were invented.3

      My conclusion: Using the patient as my guide, I focus on reversing the signs and symptoms of low thyroid function while avoiding side effects or signs of thyroid excess. When the TSH is normal but the patient continues to be symptomatic, I prefer to err on the side of treating the patient—not normalizing the blood test.

      Myth #3: Thyroid treatment that reduces the TSH to below the normal range (TSH suppression) has been shown to be harmful, causing atrial fibrillation (a heart rhythm abnormality) and bone thinning.

      Facts: When thyroid hormone is given to a patient, TSH levels decrease. Some say that thyroid treatment that reduces the TSH to below the normal range causes bone thinning and atrial fibrillation.

      Before the TSH test was invented, generations of patients flourished on doses of thyroid medicine that routinely suppress the TSH. To this day, patients with thyroid cancer who are given doses to intentionally suppress the TSH, do very well on this regimen. In 2004, after review of the scientific literature, the US Preventive Services Task Force—a leading authority—addressed the question and concluded that despite the multitude of studies, there remains no proof that TSH suppression
      is dangerous.4

      My conclusions: Listen to the patient, examine the patient and adjust treatment until the patient is well. A century of medical experience and scientific evidence indicate that giving a patient enough thyroid hormone to make them well is a reasonable and safe approach. Blood tests, urine tests and tracking body temperatures all provide additional information, but no one test should be blindly followed.

      Myth #4: Natural thyroid extracts are dangerous because they are not regulated and not consistent in dose.

      Fact: Natural thyroid extracts such as Armour Thyroid are FDA approved prescription medications that contain all 4 human thyroid hormones (T1, T2, T3 and T4.) They are prepared in accordance with the U.S. Pharmacopeia.5 Synthetic thyroid extracts, such as levothyroxine contain only T4 and are also FDA approved.

      Ironically, synthetic T4 preparations seem to have had many more problems with dose consistency than has Armour Thyroid. FDA records show repeated problems with potency and consistency for T4 products including Synthroid.6,7

      My conclusion: There is no evidence that natural thyroid extracts such as Armour Thyroid are unsafe or any more dangerous than synthetic thyroid treatments. In fact, my experience is that natural thyroid extracts are much more effective at re

  4. QUESTION:
    Can someone explain my thyroid levels?
    So my doctor called me and told me my levels, and said one was normal but high normal, and the other one was not even detectible. She said I have hypothyroidism, and I need to see a specialist. Can some explain what the levels shoudld be?
    T-4, Free 1.5
    TSH 3rd Generation <0.01 L

    • ANSWER:
      You do not have hypothyroidism. You misunderstood.

      You have hyperthyroidism. Most likely Grave's disease. That presents with nearly undetectable TSH and high T3/T4. You need further testing though. You are female? In that case you need Free T3 and Free T4. Women always needs frees. You also need TSI for a definitive diagnosis of Grave's disease.

  5. QUESTION:
    I have hyperthyroid, lastest labwork showed some things out of range. my dosage now is 112mcg.?
    tsh, 3rd generation 0.05L, t4 (thyroxine) total 14.1 H, free t4 index (t7) 4.5 H t3 uptake 32 in range. dr suggested that I need to lower my dosage. need help understanding, I am very confused. thank you for any help.

    • ANSWER:
      T3 and T4 are of little help in diagnosing or following thyroid disorders. T7 is not actually a test but a ratio of T3 and T4 to try and correct the inherent limitation of T3 and T4 levels. T7 however does not render the T3 and T4 any more useful. The test that is used to diagnose and follow hypothyroidism is thyrotropin also know as the thyroid stimulating hormone or TSH. It works by a reverse feedback loop. Thus if the brain senses that your levels of T3 and T4 are too high it will send a message to the thyroid to cease production of thyroid. The message is in the form of a very low TSH meaning a very low stimulation to the thyroid gland. As such your TSH of 0.05 indicates that your dosage of levothyroxine is too high and therefore must be reduced. If you were on 112 mcg daily presumably your physician recommended 100 or 88 mcg daily. Some physicians prefer to decrease in increments of 12 mcg and others prefer to decrease in increments of 25 mcg. If your levothyroxine dosage had been too low then the TSH would have been elevated. The brain would have read the dosage of levothyroxine as too low and it would have increased stimulation to the thyroid gland in the form of an increase in TSH. Bear in mind that the brain is not able to distinguish the levothyroxine produced by the thyroid gland from the levothyroxine that you take in pill form. Levothyroxine is T4 meaning that it has 4 iodine molecules and the normally functioning thyroid gland produces T4 but not T3. Whether it is produced by the thyroid gland or taken orally in tablet form some of the T4 is cleaved in peripheral tissues to T3 which has 3 iodine molecules. Reverse feedback loops have been known to confuse physicians as well as patients. Technically the present thyrotropin assay is a 4th generation double monoclonal antibody radio-immuno-metric assay which is among the most accurate of all blood tests ever developed. If your laboratory is referring to it as a 3rd generation test they may have simply not updated their computer's wording of the test result. It really makes no difference as both the 3rd and 4th generation thyrotropin levels are performed in an identical manner. If I may be of further assistance please let me know. I wish you the very best of health and in all things may God bless.

  6. QUESTION:
    What are normal thyroid levels?
    What is the normal value for tsh serpl qn 3rd
    Generation? What are the normal levels for tsh, t3, and t4?

    • ANSWER:
      THYROXINE (T4)
      Normal Adult Range: 4 - 11 mcg/dL

      TRIIODOTHYRONINE - T3 TOTAL
      Normal Adult Range: 75 - 220 ng/d

      THYROID-STIMULATING HORMONE (TSH) - produced by the anterior pituitary gland, causes the release and distribution of stored thyroid hormones. When T4 and T3 are too high, TSH secretion decreases, when T4 and T3 are low, TSH secretion increases.

      Normal Adult Range: 0.5-5.0 miliIU/L

  7. QUESTION:
    Thyroid blood levels?
    Okay here they are:
    TSH, 3rd generation: 5.39 (Ref range: 0.40-4.50)
    T4, Free: 1.0 (Ref range: 0.8-1.8)
    T3, Free: 308 (ref range: 230-420)

    I have hashimotos, now it looks like it has turned into hypothyroidism. My question is how much synthroid do you think i should be on?
    Also I am extremely concerned about infertility. So as long as I keep the thyroid levels controlled with meds I should be able to reproduce right? (well given that everything else is normal)

    • ANSWER:

  8. QUESTION:
    Thinning hair: Thyroid problem?
    Folks,

    I have thinning hair problem. Dermatologist recommended blood test, which showed TSH 3rd generation (Thyroid Studies) as 6.34 (normal range is 0.35 - 5.5 MCIU/ML).

    New normal range : TSH levels of 0.3 to 3.0, according to http://thyroid.about.com/cs/testsforthyroid/a/labs2003.htm.

    Dermatologist initially told that 6.34 is normal but later he called me again and told that we need to run Thyroid treatment. He has asked another full test of Thyroid levels.

    Do you think 6.34 should be treated or Doctor is recommending this to continue treatment (for bucks) ?

    What is the normal range of Thyroid levels ?

    What will be the recommended treatments ?

    Any hopes of getting the hair back ?

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, I do think you shold be treated, especially when damage can be happening with a TSH over 2.0. Your thinning hair could be a symptom of hypothyroidism. For treatment, I recommend Armour because it helps with thinning hair, fatigue, depression, brain fog, and muscle and joint aches. I am hypothyroid. I was started on Levoxyl and had no relief from symptoms. When I switched to Armour most of my symptoms went away, including the thinning hair. Armour is adjusted by free t4 and free t3, not by TSH.

  9. QUESTION:
    Do I have thyroid? what is the normal Thyroid level?
    TSH 3rd generation 3.71
    t4 thyroxine 9.3
    free t4 index t7 2.9
    t3 31%

    are these normal levels?? I'm 20 years old

    • ANSWER:
      The normal range for TSH has changed and is now like .3-3.0 So given that, your TSH is considered high. The better question is, how do you feel? If you're tired all the time, lack motivation, need more sleep, have hair loss, dry skin, low sex drive - the symptoms are seemingly endless - then your thyroid function is probably low. You should have your antibodies (peroxidase and thyroglobulin) tested for Hashimoto's disease, which can make you symptomatic with a normal TSH. This is one way that so many people go undiagnosed for so long - because they put too much emphasis on the TSH, which does not tell the whole story.

  10. QUESTION:
    I'm trying to understand my hypothyroid?
    Hello is there anyone that knows what TSH,T4 and T3 levels mean?
    My TSH 3rd generation like my report says is5.45 my T4 is 1.2 and my T3 is 293. I have had hypothyroid for 4 years but never fully understood it? now i'm having more health issues. Just diagnosed with b12 and iron deficiency. I was doing some research and sounds like i might have Hashimotos? Can anyone help?

    • ANSWER:
      I have hashimotos that is when your body destroys your thyroid gland. I take armour thyroid for mine.

  11. QUESTION:
    my TSH, 3rd Generation test came back 51.27...What are your thoughts on that?
    The Dr. put me on 100 thyroid meds and I am swelling (hands, feet, face)...He has re-tested my blood work and taken me off the pills until further notice...Isn't 51.27 extremely high?

    • ANSWER:
      yes. Normal values to be----
      TSH Test
      This blood test is the most sensitive test of thyroid function available. The TSH test can detect TSH blood levels as low as 0.01 milli-international units per liter (mIU/L). The normal range for TSH is between 0.3 and 4 mIU/L, although the range varies from one laboratory to another.

  12. QUESTION:
    6 months ago my tsh 3rd generation thyroid results were normal 1.14 i had more blood work now my tsh is 5.11?
    I cant under stand why? what would make it change so drasticly i also had a sonogram and there are 2 smal nodes on my throid less tha 1cm. i would appreciate if someone with medical knowledge would ans my question thanks

    • ANSWER:
      The TSH can fluctuate;
      it is highest early in the morning.
      if it stays at that level for longer time, you may have to be treated for hypothyroidism.
      Have the TPO antibodies checked; elevated level will indicate the Hashimoto's thyroiditis [common cause of hypothyroidism and nodule formation.

  13. QUESTION:
    Thyroid Question - Should my Doc have given me levothyroxine with my TSH level of 0.15?
    I got a TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) 3rd generation blood test and got a result of 0.15. Normal range is 0.4 to 4.5 My doctor gave me a prescription for levothyroxine. At home, I read that if you have low TSH it indicates that you actually have high thyroid hormone levels; hyperthyroidism. My prescription information says that levothyroxine is not recommended for high thyroid hormone levels. Why would my doctor want me to take a drug for low thyroid levels when my TSH seems to indicate high thyroid hormone levels?
    Thanks so far to Steve and Indiana. It was my regular doctor, Actually she's kind of an apprentice to my doc but she's been seeing me for the last few months. dose was low: 0.05 mg every two days. Still, when I researched the drug all the alarms went off. I'm hoping I have resolving thyroiditis, as my symptoms match so far and began after a prolonged upper respiratory viral infection that l.irst two weeks of August I was feeling better, then suddenly developed an aching, swollen throat and pain below the collarbone. I just got blood tests last week after none of the antibiotics they gave me worked. Kind of scary when a person has to second guess their doctor. Hope you guys and anyone else who answers have good luck and good health.
    There was a part that should have read "that I had since late may. I was feeling better the first two weeks of August..."

    • ANSWER:
      OMG ARE YOU SERIOUS?!
      what the heck dr did you go to? just your regular dr? if so thats why he's an idiot and doesn't know what the heck he's doing.
      i would go in and speak to a pharmacist at the drug store about this and just get their opinion on this whole situation cuz that way you can understand it all even more and then i'd call that dr and ask why the hell he would put you on levothyroxine. maybe he's dumb enough that YOU as the patient will have to explain that a LOW TSH level mens HYPERthyroidism and a HIGH TSH level means HYPOthyroidism which means you don't need MORE thyroid hormone in you you actually need LESS.
      since you have a LOW TSH level you should NOT be taking a thyroid pill. i mean jesus christ those pills could send you into thyroid storm and kill you!!!
      what is the dosage he put you on anyways out of curiosity?
      what you need to do is get an appointment with an endocrinologist cuz they specialize in this and know what they are doing!

  14. QUESTION:
    Thyroid TSH Levels, I need help?
    I have had hypothyroidism since I was 14yrs old, I am now 22yrs old, but I have never really paid attention to my levels before now, recently they have found a growth on my thyroid so I had my blood taken and these are the levels, they have now up-ed my meds from 112mcg levoxyl to 150mcg of levoxyl. T4, Free- 0.8ng/dL and TSH, 3rd Generation 16.23mIU/L Can anyone tell me if this is good or bad, high or low? Thanks ~Keri

    • ANSWER:
      Your TSH is way out of range... normally you want to aim for that to be between 1 and 2, but to supress the growth, they may even aim for this number to be lower than 1. Your free T4 looks like it is at the very bottom end of the range - you want that to be higher. It would also help to find out what your free T3 levels are - since that is the indicator of what is more active and bioavailable, and the relative position of the fT4 and fT3 can give you even more valuable information.

      These numbers are indications that you are definitely not on enough medication.

      It is important to note that since you are only taking a T4 medication, you may still have hypo symotoms and not feel good until you are able to add T3 into the mix - either through a dessicated thyroid or through synthetic, like Cytomel. Depending on the doctor, you may or may not have any trouble getting this added in. I strongly suggest you get yourself educated about all of these issues so you can better guide your own healthcare for this for the rest of your life.

  15. QUESTION:
    thyroid disease tests?
    My T4 and ultrasound came back normal, but now my other doctor wants me to get a tsh 3rd generation. Does that mean there is still a chance of thyroid issues?

    • ANSWER:
      yes.
      Thyroid*Symptoms
      T3 Normal-RANGE 0.790-1.490 UNITS NG/ML
      T4 Normal- RANGE 4.5 - 12 UNITS UG/DL
      TSH Normal RANGE 0.45 - 4.7 UNITS uiU/ml
      You may compare your symptoms with the real symptoms appended here under for your ready reference.

      In the case of overactive thyroid, it could be accompanied by heart flutters, tremors, or fatigue. An underactive thyroid can cause constipation or fatigue. That's why this very treatable problem is often mistaken for bowel or nervous system disorders.

      The signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism vary widely, depending on the severity of the hormone deficiency. But in general, any problems you do have tend to develop slowly, often over a number of years.
      At first, you may barely notice the symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue and sluggishness, or you may simply attribute them to getting older. But as your metabolism continues to slow, you may develop more obvious signs and symptoms. Hypothyroidism symptom may include:
      •Fatigue
      •Sluggishness
      •Increased sensitivity to cold
      •Constipation
      •Pale, dry skin
      •A puffy face
      •Hoarse voice
      •An elevated blood cholesterol level
      •Unexplained weight gain
      •Muscle aches, tenderness and stiffness
      •Pain, stiffness or swelling in your joints
      •Muscle weakness
      •Heavier than normal menstrual periods
      •Brittle fingernails and hair
      •Depression.

  16. QUESTION:
    How to control Hypo thyroid level?
    I am mathu,I am 23 years female, married.I have been suffering from hypothyroidism since my age 13 .but i am still taking syn thyroid 100 mcg for my thyroid problem.Yesterday (8/9/2011).I received my lab results.Is a TSH, 3rd generation level of 11.48 considered bad?but Last month TSH-3RD GENERATION my level is 5.13 (5/11/2011) .but now is too difference.how to control my level?suggest any foods for thyroid .which kind of food should i eat?I am planning for baby will it be a problem to get pregnant .what can i do? i am also overweight 165 pound (75kg). kindly suggest the best for me.

    • ANSWER:
      There isn't really any food that will help the thyroid, there is websites that gives list of the foods you should eat but they are only to keep you healthy. Your level of 11.48 is very high and obviously your medication needs adjusting especially if you are trying to conceive because it is very hard for someone with thyroid problems to conceive because of the hormones. Your weight of 165lbs or 11st 7lb is high but obviously depends on your height but I presume you will be around 5ft 5in and you should be around 9st-10st(126-140lb) You will need to lose the weight and not by silly quick fix diets as they do not work, you need healthy eating for the rest of your life and exercise but if you TSH levels are too high then if the medication is adjusted to the correct mcg it will probably help you lose weight. I have an under active thyroid and when I started the medication, levothyroxine 50mcg per day I did start to lose the weight, I was also diagnosed as type 2 diabetic and have to stick to healthy eating and exercise for the rest of my life and so far I have lost 14lbs. Exercise is the most important part of trying to get healthy and you don't need to spend hours in the gym, I walk an extra 30 minutes most days and it is working wonders. Good Luck

  17. QUESTION:
    Im gaining so much weight help!?
    Should I be worried about my Thyroid Peroxidase ABS levels?
    I went to get my yearly blood tests done and my Thyroid Peroxidase ABS (TPO) Level is 184 H normal range is 0-60. Should I be worried? What does this mean anyways? My doctor wasnt overly concerned... Any advice would be helpful! my TSH 3rd Generation was normal Free T3 NOrmal and Free T4 normal.

    But i only eat boiled chicken steamed vegtables, and brown rice for lunch same for dinner plus a salad, and breakfast i eat plain oatmel! And I exercise 4 days a week I have a running group, and I cant lose a single pound? I went from eating horribly to eating super healthy and nothing...however i have also been starting to experience midnight hunger before my period and all i want to do is eat and eat and eat like a crazy person! but thats only a week before my period. any suggestions dr. just said i might have gotten the bad gene in the family =(

    • ANSWER:
      i am sure your thyriod is great i am overweight and i got mine tested and it was good..i just started working out and dieting and instead of eating bad foods for your midnight hunger eat fruit or something thats healthy but i would deffentily try to stop eating at midnight because your just gaining your weight back that you are loosing from your workout so stop eating after you have your fruit after dinner or whatever it is you eat after dinner its not gonna help your weight hope that helps

  18. QUESTION:
    Question about my thyroid panel test?
    I had a Thyroid Panel with TSH, 3rd Generation test conducted:
    Test name----Result---Flag---Reference
    T-3 Uptake---38%---High---22-35
    T-4 (Thyroxine), Total---7.3 mcg/dL---No---4.5-12.5
    Free T4 Index(T7)---2.8---No---1.4-3.8
    TSH,3rd gen.---3.10 mIU/L---No---.50-4.30

    Can anyone explain to me what this means? Am I at risk for a certain thyroid problem?

    This test was done about a month and a half ago, and yesterday I think I found a thyroid larger then the other on the side of my neck.

    FTW I am a 20 year old male with no medical problems.
    ..please help..thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Let me explain a little about the thyroid:

      There are two glands involved when dealing with
      a metabolism problem: The thyroid and the pituitary
      gland in the brain.
      Both of them makes hormones.

      TSH is the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone that the
      Pituitary Gland, in the Brain, makes when it is signalled
      that the thyroid hormone is going too low in the body.
      The pituitary than makes more of this TSH hormone and
      releases it into the body to signal the thyroid to make
      more thyroxine.

      The Thyroid makes the Thyroxine hormone (T4 which then turns
      into T3 that the body uses for energy reasons)

      If both the TSH (that the pituitary gland makes) and
      the Thyroxine (that the thyroid makes) is within
      normal range in the body...then the patient doesn't
      have a thyroid problem.

      If the TSH level in the blood goes "higher" than normal
      and the Thyroxine is "lower" than normal...than the
      person is considered to be hypothyroid...hypo means
      low...therefore the thyroid isn't making enough of the
      hormone when signalled to do so and it is not functioning
      properly. Hypothryoidism: slows down the metabolism too much.

      If the TSH level in the blood goes "lower" than normal
      and the Thyroxine is "higher" than normal...then the
      person is considered to by hyperthyroid..hyper means
      higher...therefore the thyroid is making too much of the
      hormone, thyroixine, and the pituitary stops production of the
      TSH. The thyroid is still not functioning properly..and
      this will speed up the metabolism too much:
      Hyperthyroidism

      I would discuss with your doctor why your T-3 level is
      higher than normal. He may take another test to be
      sure. No one blood testing is 100% accurate.
      With more testing he can be sure it stays elevated and
      find out the reason for it. However, All your other
      levels are in normal range.
      Here are some links that may benefit you...just click
      on them:
      http://www.drkaslow.com/html/thyroid.html
      http://www.allthyroid.org/disorders/index.html
      http://www.thyroidmanager.org/

      There are only one reason that I could come up with
      if this T3 level stays higher: the adrenal gland has
      responded because of being under alot of stress in
      your life.

      This is for your information...it is not a diagnosis

      I hope this has helped you

  19. QUESTION:
    What causes Thyroid levels to fluctuate?
    About 3 years ago, i had a blood test and my thyroid (TSH, 3rd generation) was like 8.5 (PLEASE NOTE I'VE NEVER TAKEN ANY THYROID MEDICATION SO THIS IS ALL W/O ANY TREATMENT) and recently had it tested again and it was 7.86 and today (6 months later) it was 4.68 (almost normal). just wondering why it has fluctuated over a few years up/down.? i haven't had hypothyroid symptoms otherwise and usually feel hot and not cold. (have always ran warmer). also my T4, free has always been 1.0 for all of these tests.

    so just wondering why my thyroid seems to be normal now after being so high previously (w/o again any treatment). my doctor is on the conservative side and didn't want me to get on medication before she was sure there is a problem and I'm glad she didn because now my thyroid is normal w/o any treatment EVER! never have taken any thyroid pills.

    • ANSWER:
      i think they can fluctuate sometimes for no real reason but that's good it's back to normal. i guess good reason not to get on medication for it unless you know you really have hypothyroidism.

  20. QUESTION:
    what is my dr testing me for?
    i have to get my blood drawn this week and i want to know what they are testing me for
    1- serum lead level
    2-comp metabolic panel(14)
    3- liquid panel with TC:HDL ratio
    4-CBC with DIFF WITH PIT
    -5 hemoglobin A1C
    -6 TSH 3rd generation
    all six of these things i listed are what my dr wants me to get tested for
    what does this mean in a smple language

    • ANSWER:
      (1) Lead levels - blood
      This test is used to screen people at risk for lead poisoning, including industrial workers and children who live in urban areas. It is also used to see if treatment for lead poisoning is working.
      While lead serves no function in our bodies, it is usually found in the body in some amount since it is so common in the environment. Low levels in adults are not thought to be harmful, but in infants and children, low levels of lead can lead to toxicity that may cause deficits in intellectual or cognitive development.
      (2) Comprehensive metabolic panel
      This test will give your doctor information about:--
      * How your kidneys and liver are working
      * Blood sugar, cholesterol, and calcium levels
      * Sodium, potassium, and chloride levels (called electrolytes)
      * Protein levels
      (3) Coronary risk profile. Risk for cardiac disease is assessed by dividing the total cholesterol level by the HDL level. Target values are <5 for men and <4.4 for women.
      (4) A complete blood count (CBC) is used to detect or monitor many different health conditions. It may be used to:--
      * Diagnose infections or allergies
      * Detect blood clotting problems or blood disorders, including anemia
      * Evaluate red blood cell production or destruction
      (5) HbA1c: Your doctor may order this test if you have diabetes. It shows how well you are controlling your diabetes.
      The test may also be used to screen for diabetes.
      (6) TSH test: Your doctor will order this test if you have symptoms or signs of an overactive or underactive thyroid gland. It is also used to monitor treatment of these conditions.
      Please note that I am not a medical professional.

  21. QUESTION:
    My TSH level is a .422, how dangerous is that?
    My lab results came in from a randomly ordered TSH 3rd generation blood test, my levels are .422 and i know standard levels are (.450-4.00), Exactly how low is that? and what does it mean? All the websites ive seen just say my levels are low none will tell me how extreme that level is
    p.s the doctor did not call for a TSH 4 test
    and p.s.s...... i wasnt question normal levels... i know the normal levels and .3 level is below avg. sodont respond to me if you dont know what your talking about.

    • ANSWER:
      As of February 2010, at most laboratories in the U.S., the official "normal" reference range for the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) blood test runs from approximately .5 to 4.5/5.0.

      It's now seven years since the experts have established that this new, narrower TSH normal range of 0.3 to 3.0 is a more accurate one, and recommended that it become the standard of practice. Yet, the dithering continues. Some doctors use the new range for diagnosis and therapeutic management -- others refuse to consider anything unless it's marked "High" or "Low" on laboratory reports.

      Patients can arm themselves with copies of the AACE and National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry reports, educate their practitioners, and patronize those doctors who stay up on the research, and leave behind those doctors who stick their heads in the sand and refuse to recognize millions of undiagnosed, undertreated people with hypothyroidism.
      One study found that using a TSH upper normal range of 5.0, approximately 5% of the population is hypothyroid.

      However, if the upper portion of the normal range was lowered to 3.0, approximately 20% of the population would be hypothyroid.

      Take care

      Ben Trolled

      So I would say it depends on your doctor..

  22. QUESTION:
    TSH results what do you think (ttc)?
    Okay so for the past month I have been going through loads of tests and seeing several doctors. About my high thyroid levels and my newly discovered PCOS. So today I got my second blood test results back from my thyroid, and my levels have dropped a lot. Before my 3rd generation was 6.59 it is now 3.59 with no medicine, I know it is still elevated the standards i guess are .30-3.0. But i am ttc so i know they need to be lower then that. BUTTT do you think my gyno will finally give me the medicine to help me conceive now that my thyroid is within there ranges? I already called my gyno as soon as I had the results in my hands, i'm just waiting for her to return my call!! I started a low carb diet (was told it would help with the PCOS) and have lost close to 10lbs in a week!!. For anyone who doesn't know what PCOS it is poly-cystic ovarian syndrome and it sucks beyond belief. For anyone who has seen my posts lately. I did have a positive pregnancy test from equate but i tested this morning with first response gold digital and i got a BFN, sadly i'm pretty sure that i'm not but i shall keep trying :) If any one that has any comments about all the crazy stuff that i am going through please feel free to leave your advice. Even if it is just about the pregnancy tests, its really bugging me that i got a possible false positive. I have no idea when i am due for AF since I have PCOS and extremely irregular cycles. Oh I also took the blue dye double lined equate test. It was a faint positive right away, it was not an evap line, I did use FMU both times taking the tests. The line was very faint tho, but me and the hub both saw it. Sorry this is so long. =/ Please no rude comments. If you don't have any good advice please just don't bother. Many people with both my disorders end up never getting a baby.

    • ANSWER:

  23. QUESTION:
    I had the Thyroid panel done and....?
    I had the thyroid panel test done and the only thing that came back elevated was the TSH 3rd generation it came out to 4.62 and normal range is 0.40-4.50. Is it high by a lot? And what does it mean when only that test was out of range? I don’t have a doctor or insurance I get the labs for free because I work at a pediatrician’s office, which specializes only in children.
    thank you guys, oh and I did ask the doctor but I wanted another opinion see 3 years ago my T3 came super elevated 380 and normal is till 219. I was diagnosed with hypothyroid. They put me on synthroid and I stopped taking it about 2 years ago because of the insurance issue. Now I take the test and I apparently have nothing just the TSH a little high so I found it weird because supposedly hypothyroid is for the rest of your life.

    • ANSWER:
      That's not very high. However, High TSH levels may be caused by:
      * An underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism).
      * A pituitary gland tumor that is making too much TSH. This is uncommon.
      * Not taking enough thyroid hormone medicine for treatment of an underactive thyroid gland.

      Reasons you may not be able to have the test or why the results may not be helpful include:
      * Taking medicine, such as corticosteroids, levodopa, heparin, dopamine, lithium (such as Carbolith or Duralith), methimazole (Tapazole), and propylthiouracil.
      * Having had a recent X-ray with iodine dye or test using radioactive materials.
      * Having severe stress or a long-term (chronic) illness.

      The results of a TSH test should be considered along with the results of thyroid hormone tests, especially thyroxine (T4) results.

      I am more concerned that you don't have health insurance than I am by the results of that test.

  24. QUESTION:
    TSH 3rd Generation 5.81 too high?
    I just received my lab tests back and my TSH 3rd gen was above normal at 5.81. My T4 however was in normal range. Is this something I should be concerned about? My doctor wants to follow up in 3 - 6 months. Is there anything I can do to lower that number without medication? Thanks for you input!

    • ANSWER:
      It's a tad high (according to my normal range of .4-4.0) You might have sub clinical hypothyroidism, but a small dose of Levothyroxine will fix that. I would advise you to avoid goitrogenic foods and soy products. Eat fish and use iodized salt. Diet usually can't fix a thyroid level that is off.

  25. QUESTION:
    Thyroid panel results, what do they mean.?
    TSH, 3rd generation - 0.02 (low). Normal range 0.40 - 4.50
    T4 free- 1.4 (normal).. Normal range 0.8 - 1.8
    T3 free - 470 (high)..Normal range 230 - 420

    My dr. says I have hyperthyroidism, but my T4 levels are normal, so how can that be?

    Also, I don't have alot of the normal symptoms, the only symptoms I have is that I am tired a lot, depression and aggitated. Thats it, can I be hyperthyroidism with so few symptoms?

    Please help to explain to me my results...
    Hey lab rat, I will be working in a lab as a technician in about 6 months... What should I be expecting, like should I already have known that. I am worried that I don't know enough (remember) enough. Will I be ok on my extern?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you have hyperthyroidism. Your T3 is out of range. Plus your T4 is pretty high. Normal, but still high. And you are symptomatic. Get a proper diagnosis. (Hyperthyroidism isn't a diagnosis. It's just a symptom.) And then get treatment. You'll feel a lot better.

  26. QUESTION:
    What reference range should I look at to verify if I have hypo or hyperthyroidism?
    A yr ago they found a small nodule on my thyroid. The endo put me on half a pill of 25 mcg (I think that's what it was - she said it was a very small dose) to shrink the nodule. At that point I told her I was always extremely tired & always got headaches or migraines, but she said according to my blood levels I was not hypo or hyper, but that I should take the meds to shrink the nodule. I took the meds for about one yr and actually got my energy back & my migraines were less frequent, but also developed a rash and my hair started falling out. The endo said to stop the meds. It's been two months now & I feel extremely tired again, have the headaches/migraines again, I feel depressed and even moody. My hands and feet are always cold. Could it be that I actually do need the meds? The dr keep saying I don't , but why do I feel better when I do take them? Is it in my head? Here are my results: T4, free: 1.0, TSH, 3rd generation: 1.04. In advance, thanks for your answers.

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.labtestsonline.org/understanding/index.html

      this site has all the standard reference ranges and explanations of the various lines on your blood work. I have it bookmarked for a good reference site. It has helped me a lot to understand all the different lines on the blood work panels.

  27. QUESTION:
    my thryroid levels please explain to me?
    TSH,3rd generation 0.61 referance 0.40-4.50.IU/L

    T4, FREE referance 0.8-1.8 ng/dl

    does this mean I am normal, near low? or what???? thanks ahead of time
    the T4, FREE is 1.3, I was just wondering cause it was low in August, but was put on synthroid 25mg's and I felt awful, lost tons of weight, got panick attacks, and bad anxiety,. took myself off of the med after 3 months of misery, went back for a check up 2 months later and was told I was now normal, so I dont know what's going on with me.

    • ANSWER:
      TSH stands for Thyroid Stimulating Hormone. Your pituitary gland produces more TSH when your thyroid level is low. It's like a wake-up call for your thyroid: "hey, buddy, time to get up!" When your thyroid level is high, your pituitary gland sends out less TSH. So, it's a little counter-intuitive, but high TSH means low thyroid and low TSH means high thyroid.

      Your TSH is on the low end of normal, meaning that your thyroid actually functions quite well - faster than slower. TSH is a sore point for many people with thyroid disorders because TSH can be normal even when other measures of thyroid are abnormal. Also, as you can see, the reference range is very wide, and anyone with hypothyroidism knows that symptoms persist when TSH is on the high end of that range. Most of us feel better below 2 and often below 1, which is where most people with normal thyroid function are (people like you).

      You didn't give your T4 number, just the reference range, so I can't comment, but the TSH looks normal. If you're showing symptoms of hypo- or hyperthyroidism, though, you should push for more comprehensive testing than just TSH and T4. For example, T4 converts to T3 in the liver, and if this conversion goes wrong, you can feel hypothyroid even with totally normal TSH and T4. If you aren't showing symptoms, then the TSH is a good sign that you're probably normal.

  28. QUESTION:
    What is a TSH 3rd gen test?
    I got blood work done. One of the test is a THS 3rd gen. I know it has something to do with the thyroid, but whats the difference between a THS 3rd gen and a T3 or T4?

    • ANSWER:
      TSH stands for Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, which is a hormone produced by the brain in response to how well the thyroid is functioning. Measuring TSH is the easiest way to check for thyroid disease (either overactive or underactive).

      3rd gen simply means this is the 3rd-generation TSH test -- more accurate than the 1st- or 2nd-generation tests.

      T3 and T4 are short-form names for thyroid hormones. Measuring these offer additional clues to the diagnosis. For example, someone with an overactive thyroid will have a low TSH and high levels of T3 and T4.

  29. QUESTION:
    Hyperthyroidism or Hypothyroidism ?
    I got some blood tests done, and i talked to the nurse on the phone, and she said that my TSH was elevated, which led me to beleive i had hyperthyroidism. I talked to the doctor, and she says its hypo. I don't know who to believe. I have almost every symptom for Hyper. These are my blood test results:

    TSH, 3rd Generation: 6.89 Ref Range: 0.40-4.50 mIU/L

    Anyone know what this means? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Your TSH is borderline elevated. (the 'third generation' bit is irrelevant). High TSH indicates an underactive thyroid (hypothyroid). TSH is the body's way of yelling at the thyroid to work harder. But since your level is only slightly increased, I'd be surprised if you got diagnosed as hypothyroid based on just that. More likely you'd be followed up with some more tests in a couple of months. There are other reasons why you can get a bordeline high result, such as some medications and other kinds of illness. There is a way that you can have elevated TSH and be hyperthyroid (a "TSHoma") but you'd be one in a million!

  30. QUESTION:
    difference in ultrasensitive tsh test vs. tsh?
    what is the difference in the ultra sensitive tsh blood test vs the regular tsh blood test. Is it better at detecting a thyroid problem? Also I know some labs levels of ''normal'' vary what are the newest standards as far as this goes?
    I read that the levels for what is considered normal have changed but many doctors and labs still use the ''older'' levels. I believe this to be accurate information and maybe that is why thyroid problems are underdiagnosed. In my opinion.....

    • ANSWER:
      It can measure lower levels of TSH. It is not any extra help in diagnosing a thyroid problem. It can be useful in monitoring treatment of an existing thyroid problem, especially with hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid). It is sometimes known as "3rd generation" TSH. It's really not something that you need to know/worry about as a patient - it's a technical thing.

      "Normal" is defined as the range covering 95% of a healthy population. The range will vary depending on the analytical method used, for technical reasons. You need to refer to the range that came with your test results. The debate around TSH ranges is really about what constitutes a 'healthy' population - i.e. what results should be included when they decide the range.

  31. QUESTION:
    Thyroid Problem, test came back negative?
    A few months ago I had a test done to see if I had a thyroid problem. had all the usual symptoms; an enlarged neck, massive weight gain, tired all of the time and even family history of thyroid problems (half of my entire family is on medication). However, when I got my test done it seemed there was nothing wrong with my thyroid levels and all they found was a small nodule (sp?) that is too small to even do a biopsy on. However, I am still have the same symptoms as before and I practically pass out everyday when I come home because Im so tired.

    So are blood tests always right or in some instances could people still have a thyroid problem when the test comes back negative? Does anyone know of anything else I might have that can cause massive weight gain, neck enlargement or extreme tiredness?

    Thanks in advance. :3

    • ANSWER:
      It has been known for the last 50 years that Thyroid Function Tests are not reliable and that people with perfect blood tests could have advanced hypothyroidism. Find a doc in your area (in sources) that treats to symptoms.

      Myth #1: The TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) blood test is the only way to diagnose hypothyroidism/low thyroid.

      Facts: First, there is no perfect test in medicine—not the TSH or any other. Second, nearly a century before the TSH test was developed, doctors made the diagnosis of hypothyroidism without any tests at all. They listened to their patients and examined them. Since then, there have been many tests that have been blindly followed until they proved to be unreliable and were discarded.

      To this day, there are at least three types of hypothyroidism for which the TSH test does not even test. The TSH is not a useful test for hypothyroidism caused by dysfunction of the pituitary gland or of the hypothalamus (part of the brain,) or for hypothyroidism caused by "tissue resistance" to the effects of thyroid hormone.

      My conclusion: The TSH test can miss the diagnosis of hypothy-
      roidism. To most accurately identify hypothyroidism, I start with the approach that has worked for over a century. I listen to the patient and look for evidence of low thyroid function. If the patient appears hypothyroid, I order blood tests including the TSH, but I also (1) check basal body temperature,1 and (2) check the urine thyroid hormone levels.2 I then interpret all test results in the context of the
      individual patient.

      Myth #2: Normalizing the TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) blood test is the best way to treat hypothyroidism.

      Fact:Many studies have shown adjusting thyroid doses to normalize the TSH blood test leaves many patients with symptoms of low thyroid. World-renowned thyroid specialist, Sir Anthony Toft, MD, discussed this sad fact in 2002. In a speech to the British Endocrine Society, Dr. Toft reviewed some of the evidence that demonstrated that the modern TSH-centered approach was ineffective. He concluded, "...the treatment of hypothyroidism is about to come full circle"—going back to the approach that worked so well before all of our modern tests and treatments were invented.3

      My conclusion: Using the patient as my guide, I focus on reversing the signs and symptoms of low thyroid function while avoiding side effects or signs of thyroid excess. When the TSH is normal but the patient continues to be symptomatic, I prefer to err on the side of treating the patient—not normalizing the blood test.

      Myth #3: Thyroid treatment that reduces the TSH to below the normal range (TSH suppression) has been shown to be harmful, causing atrial fibrillation (a heart rhythm abnormality) and bone thinning.

      Facts: When thyroid hormone is given to a patient, TSH levels decrease. Some say that thyroid treatment that reduces the TSH to below the normal range causes bone thinning and atrial fibrillation.

      Before the TSH test was invented, generations of patients flourished on doses of thyroid medicine that routinely suppress the TSH. To this day, patients with thyroid cancer who are given doses to intentionally suppress the TSH, do very well on this regimen. In 2004, after review of the scientific literature, the US Preventive Services Task Force—a leading authority—addressed the question and concluded that despite the multitude of studies, there remains no proof that TSH suppression
      is dangerous.4

      My conclusions: Listen to the patient, examine the patient and adjust treatment until the patient is well. A century of medical experience and scientific evidence indicate that giving a patient enough thyroid hormone to make them well is a reasonable and safe approach. Blood tests, urine tests and tracking body temperatures all provide additional information, but no one test should be blindly followed.

      Myth #4: Natural thyroid extracts are dangerous because they are not regulated and not consistent in dose.

      Fact: Natural thyroid extracts such as Armour Thyroid are FDA approved prescription medications that contain all 4 human thyroid hormones (T1, T2, T3 and T4.) They are prepared in accordance with the U.S. Pharmacopeia.5 Synthetic thyroid extracts, such as levothyroxine contain only T4 and are also FDA approved.

      Ironically, synthetic T4 preparations seem to have had many more problems with dose consistency than has Armour Thyroid. FDA records show repeated problems with potency and consistency for T4 products including Synthroid.6,7

      My conclusion: There is no evidence that natural thyroid extracts such as Armour Thyroid are unsafe or any more dangerous than synthetic thyroid treatments. In fact, my experience is that natural thyroid extracts are much more effective at restoring normal metabolism and, therefore, very likely better for one's health.

      Myth # 5: Once you start thyroid hormone, you need to take it for the rest of your life.

      Fact: Taking thyroid hormone w

  32. QUESTION:
    TSH Levels?
    I'm a 24 year old female 130lbs. I had some bloodwork done and my levels came back low at 0.021uIU/mL. I just recently started having symptoms after a D&C procedure in Feb. this year. I go to see a Dr. next Wed. Will I need medication? Is this horrible? I'm trying to get pregnant again after my recent misscarriage only to have more BS to deal with.

    • ANSWER:
      You didn't say what kind of symptoms and I assum the 0.021 μIU/mL is a TSH result (you mentioned "blood work" and that encompasses about a million different possibilities)

      According to at least 1 source I checked with:

      A normal range of 0.35 μIU/mL to 4.94 μIU/mL (99% confidence interval) was obtained by testing serum specimens from 549 individuals defined as
      normal.
      This information is for a 3rd generation TSH assay which only means that it is one of the most sensitive in detecting TSH in human serum.

      I suspect that the MD will order a T4 and T3 level on you and I also suspect that one or both will be higher than expected.

      There's a complicated tri-axis feedback mechanism loop between T4, T3 and TSH. Its all designed to keep everything in balance. I'll leave out the technical stuff and leave it at that.

      You will probably need to be evaluated by an endocrinologist for a final diagnosis.

      Its not horrible, but it does need to be investigated and, if necessary, treated.
      Thyroid problems (hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism) can inpact bone densities, carbohydrate metabolism, muscle conditions, etc.

      There may be medication or some other treatments available, but that depends on what the MD says.

      In any event, it would be a good idea to get a second opinion before initiating a treatment regimen.

      I suspect that correcting the thryoid issue (if there really is one) would have a positive impact on your pregnancy chances.

      Good luck!!

  33. QUESTION:
    Bloodwork test results help?
    I've been feeling really tired and mentally slower. Can someone tell me if my blood is normal? I'm not sure about maybe having something off with my adrenals.

    3rd generation tsh 0.78
    t4 free 1.3
    t3 free 3.2
    folate 8.5
    b12 393

    • ANSWER:
      They are thyroid tests and they are within normal limits , right. What is the level of hemoglobin? I don't rely that much on Lab works as compared to physical findings. I only comfirm my diagnosis with lab report which @ times are wrong. Have yourself reviewed OK.

  34. QUESTION:
    Is there a correlation between low blood sugar and hypothyroidism?
    I have a non-functioning thyroid (had hyperthyroidism and the radioactive iodine treatment and am now hypothyroid) and my TSH levels are in the normal range. It was 1.25 My blood pressure was 90/53, and I usually run lower than the "norm"

    I keep having symptoms of low blood sugar and had a bunch of tests done by my doctor. I have a daughter who is a Type 1 Diabetic, so I also check myself on her meter when I am not feeling well. My numbers are usually between 61-68 when I am feeling low. My doctor says 65 is in the normal range. I know for my daughter, her range is 70-100 and lower than 70 is considered too low.

    The doctor originally suspected an insulinoma when I saw him 6 months ago and the testing then came back normal. A week ago, they did a fasting and PP insulin test on me, along with InsW and C-Peptide. I still haven't gotten the result of the fasting (checked on daughter's meter and it was 67 about 30 minutes before I had my blood drawn) and the PP was 80. My C-Peptide was 0.8 (lowest normal on the reference range) and the InsW was 2.5. They also did an A1C on me which was 4.8.

    I'm not sure if the blood sugar issues have anything to do with the hypothyroidism, as they are both autoimmune. My doctor doesn't seem to be worried, but I have been experiencing what are low blood sugars to me (including all of the hypo symptoms) for about six months. Should I request other tests to be done as well to try to figure out why I keep having lower blood sugar?

    I'm really confused and want to be sure there isn't something more serious going on. Thanks in advance for any help!

    • ANSWER:
      Connection between thyroid disease and diabetes:

      "To counteract this lack of awareness, and encourage Americans to uncover their family health history to discover their at-risk medical conditions, AACE is launching a new campaign, "The Neck's Generation: Thyroid Genealogy," to educate the public about the genetic links associated with thyroid disease. Research shows that there is a strong genetic link between thyroid disease and other autoimmune diseases including certain types of diabetes, anemia and arthritis (2). In fact, thyroid disease affects more than 13 million Americans, yet more than half remain undiagnosed.(3)"

      and...

      "The Diabetes-Thyroid Connection

      AACE's survey found that 79 percent of Americans did not know there is a connection between diabetes and thyroid disease(6). In fact, fifteen to 20 percent of diabetics and their siblings or parents are at a greater risk of presenting with thyroid disease compared to 4.5 percent of the general population(7)."
      http://thyroid.about.com/library/news/blneckgen.htm

      and...

      "Diabetic patients have a higher prevalence of thyroid disorders compared with the normal population (Table 1). Because patients with one organ-specific autoimmune disease are at risk of developing other autoimmune disorders, and thyroid disorders are more common in females, it is not surprising that up to 30% of female type 1 diabetic patients have thyroid disease. The rate of postpartum thyroiditis in diabetic patients is three times that in normal women. A number of reports have also indicated a higher than normal prevalence of thyroid disorders in type 2 diabetic patients, with hypothyroidism being the most common disorder." http://journal.diabetes.org/clinicaldiabetes/v18n12000/Pg38.htm

  35. QUESTION:
    My doctor said I have temporary hypothyroidism?
    I recently went to the doctor because I had been feeling really sluggish, having memory problems and trouble concentrating, and I had been even more depressed even though I take an anti- depressant. He said from the time he walked in the room he could tell that my thyroid was enlarged. So he ran some tests( TSH) and told me I had an under active thyroid. I went back the next morning and he ran more tests( T3 and T4). I also went and got a ultrasound done. The levels came back and they weren't normal but he told me that he thought it was just temporary.
    Usually I wouldn't have a problem with that but three generations of women in my family before me have had thyroid disease. I really don't think that this is just temporary with my family history of thyroid disease and the symptoms ive been experiencing. It's been about a month since he told me that im im just progressively feeling worse. I scheduled an appointment to go back and see him to talk more about it and to run more tests. What should I say to him when I go in? I'm just upset about it because i've been feeling like this for years and none of my doctors have been able to figure out why. Also, if it helps im a 17 year old girl and im pretty healthy.

    Thanks for taking the time to read this :)

    • ANSWER:
      Dont waste your time going back to him! Get a REAL doctor! This makes me MAD!!!

      How could he know that it is probably temporary and not treat it!?!

      Here is info you need:
      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

thyroid levels tsh 3rd generation

Leave a Reply