Tag Archives: low levels thyroid stimulating hormone symptoms

Low Levels Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Symptoms

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What does a high ratio of FSH/LH and low thyroid levels mean for a teenager?
    What does it mean if the FSH LH ratio is high and the thyroid levels are low for a 14 year old?
    What are the symptoms, treatments and anything else?
    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      FSH ( Follicle Stimulating Hormone) LH ( Lutenizing Hormone). FSH stimulates follicles in the ovaries to grow and secrete estrogens. LH stimulates the ovarian follicle and ovum to develop to maturity and secrete estrogens. It means you're hitting puberty. Low thyroid levels ( hypothyroidism) shouldnt be an issue at this age, unless it is congenitial (happened at birth), but the symptoms of hypothyroidism are Nervousness, tremors,insomnia, weight loss, menstrual irregularities, leg cramps, fever, heart rhythm abnormailites ( dysrhythmias), hair loss, enlarged facial features. It's treated with drugs like Levothyroxine, Liothyronine.

  2. QUESTION:
    Does your thyroid gland have to be swollen for you to have a thyroid problem?
    I have all of the symptoms of a thyroid problem except a swollen thyroid gland. So does it sound like I have a thyroid problem or does it sound like a different problem?

    • ANSWER:
      No, it does NOT have to be swollen and you should NOT be diagnosed on a thyroid blood panel only! Especially if the doc only blood tests for TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone). If he/she does then run do not walk from their office. TSH is your body's thermostat which is secreted by your Pituitary Gland.

      I learned the hard way from experience and now due to doctor's misconceptions I had to have my thyroid surgically removed. I missed thyroid cancer by a hair width. I will be taking 2 pills 3 times per day for the rest of my life because of doctors solely relying on blood tests. I had a sub-clinical thyroid condition (meaning blood tests within the normal to low normal range) which later resulted in a autoimmune disease thyroid condition. I should have been diagnosed based on symptoms, but it takes a doc with a lot of knowledge to think outside the 4-corners of their medical textbook and guts too. My symptoms began 15 years ago and it took 15 years to hit rock bottom for my disease to surface on blood tests but then it became an autoimmune disease and was TOO LATE. Autoimmune disease is where your immune system turns against you and it begins to attack your body.

      Also, I found that specialists such as Endocrinologists were the least informed. I found that they were quick to push mental health drugs treating only the symptoms and not getting to the root of the real problem. Go to the library and SELF-EDUCATE, read all books by patient advocate Mary J. Shomon, Doctors Ridha Ahrem and Steven F. Hotze. Once you learn just how important the thyroid is to your body's well being and how it functions, then you will be able to connect the dots. You know your body better than anyone.

      If you can remember one key important fact which is that some/most doctors medicate using the T-4 hormone (a thyroid pro-hormone) only, but a patient's problem could lie with the assimilation of the T-3 hormone (the thyroids active hormone). After T-4 enters cells it must be converted into T-3 which is the active active form of thyroid hormone (active OUTSIDE of your blood stream) it is what effects your mental health (depression), memory, fatigue, body temperature, muscle strength, cholesterol level, weight, hair, skin, nails, etc. A complete hormone panel is key too (estrogens, progesterone, testosterone, DHEA, cortisol,melatonin). I prefer hormone testing using saliva over blood, which unfortunately, the majority of insurance plans do not cover. I feel it is money well spent.

      Good Luck and Be Well.

  3. QUESTION:
    How to Tell if you Have a Thyroid Problem?
    I'm 19 years old and overweight. I've tried dieting i the past, didn't do much (if anything). My grandmother has a thyroid condition. With her medication she doesn't gain any weight (in fact, she can eat anything). Neither of my parents have thyroid problems. Is thyroid-ism passed genetically? Does it skip a generation? How can you tell if you have it? Any information about thyroid ism is appreciated. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid disease tends to run in families, and tends to affect women more than men. Three generations of women, including myself, on my mother's side of the family all have thyroid disorders of one type or another. There is a possibilty that thyroid disease has run undetected on my father's side as well.
      If you are having trouble losing weight, feel tired all the time, are depressed, have dry, brittle hair and nails, feel bloated and are constipated, and are sensitive to cold, then you may have what is called hypothyroidism. This means that the thyroid is not producing enough hormones, which regulate the body's metabolism. A simple blood test that looks for TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone), T3, and T4 can determine if your thyroid is to blame. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced by the pituitary gland to make the thyroid work. If your TSH levels are high, then you may have hypothyroidism.
      If your TSH levels are low, then you may have the opposite: hyperthyroidism, or an overactive thyroid. Symptoms include: weight loss, increased appetite, sensitivity to heat, oily hair and skin, hair loss, tremors, fatigue, anxiety, high blood pressure and pulse, and heart palpitations. People with hyperthyroidism may find that they can eat what they want and not gain much or any weight.
      Since you have a family history of thyroid problems, it might not hurt to see your doctor about it. You can expect a blood test, and to wait a week or so for the results. Thyroid problems are manageable and you will be able to live a normal life.
      Good luck.

  4. QUESTION:
    Why would the physician give the patient cortisol? What problems would arise from this treatment?
    A physician notes that individuals with a tumor on the pancreas secrete unusually high levels of insulin. Unfortunately, insulin in high concentrations causes blood sugar levels to fall below the normal acceptable range. In attempt to correct the problem, the physician decides to inject the patient with cortisol. Why would the physician give the patient cortisol? What problems would arise from this treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      To the guy above me: Glucagon may be the opposite of insulin but it will not lower the insulin levels. It will only regulate the metabolism. The patient would be better off taking an insulin blocker to avoid a liver problem. Cortisol counter acts insulin by stimulating gluconeogenesis and inhibiting the use of glucose by decreasing the amount of transport proteins. Gluconeogenesis is the metabolism process that makes glucose. By having more glucose and the transporter protein for glucose being shut down, the body thinks it is in a "well fed" state (or has enough energy). The state then tells the liver "woa woa woa we're stuffed, no need for more energy" so they turn the glucose into glycogen which then lowers the insulin and raises the glucagon.
      This was a good move on the doctors pair because Cortisol is a hormone which means it moves really fast, so the effect of the treatment was fast. As for prolonged exposure to the cortisol here is a list i found:

      "Impaired cognitive performance
      Suppressed thyroid function
      Blood sugar imbalances such as hyperglycemia
      Decreased bone density
      Decrease in muscle tissue
      Higher blood pressure
      Lowered immunity and inflammatory responses in the body, slowed wound healing, and other health consequences
      Increased abdominal fat, which is associated with a greater amount of health problems than fat deposited in other areas of the body. Some of the health problems associated with increased stomach fat are heart attacks, strokes, the development of metabolic syndrome, higher levels of “bad” cholesterol (LDL) and lower levels of “good” cholesterol (HDL), which can lead to other health problems!""

      Do remember that this is only a long exposer to cortisol. For the process that the Doctor did, or a quick fix to the insulin, there would be relatively low symptoms other than slightly increased blood pressure
      Hope that helped

  5. QUESTION:
    THYROID ISSUE: What do you think my treatment should be with these test results and what are yours?
    These are my test results. More are being done and I am seeing a doctor, but do you think these would be cause for taking any medicine or receiving treatment:

    Thyroxine Binding Globe 18.0
    Thyroid Stimulating Hormone 0.03 (LOW)
    Thyroxine, Free 1.5
    Thyroxine 9.5
    Triiodothyronine 172

    Also, what are your test results/numbers? (just so I can compare with mine)

    • ANSWER:
      My interpretation of your results is based on the assumption that you are an adult and you are not currently being treated for any thyroid disorders.

      Your TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) is definitely low. The modern guidelines say it should be between 0.3 and 2.5.

      Your Free T4 (thyroxine, free) is approximately in the middle of the normal range of 0.7 to 2.0.

      Total T4 ("thyroxine") should be between 4.0 and 12.0. At 9.5, yours is within the normal range.

      Total T3 (triiodothyronine) should be between 80 and 200, which yours is.

      TBG (thyroxine binding globulin) should be between 16 and 34. Yours, at 18, is technically within range, but is very close to the bottom of the range.

      It is hard to make heads or tails of your lab work. It is far from typical. Usually with a TSH that low, we would see a corresponding high level of free or total T4 and T3 (in hyperthyroidism) or a very low level of T4 and T3 (in secondary hypothyroidism), but we don't in this case.

      I suspect, based on a very limited understanding of the TBG test, that your lowish TBG is making your T4 and T3 look normal when you are really hyperthyroid (as indicated by your low TSH). You definitely need further testing, and I am NOT a medical doctor (I don't even play one on TV), but I do think you could potentially have hyperthyroidism and need medical treatment eventually. I can't think what else would cause such a low TSH without a corresponding elevated T4 and T3 level.

      I hope the doctor's able to sort this out for you. You haven't said whether you're having any symptoms, but if so, I hope you feel better soon!

      Oh and btw my most recent TSH is .16 (LOW) and so I'm in the middle of a dose change. I just had a full thyroid panel done last week but have not yet gotten the results. My TSH at diagnosis was 32.71. Sorry that I don't have the other numbers in front of me.

  6. QUESTION:
    What could these blood test results indicate?
    I'm 20, I just got back these blood results, and my doctor referred me to an endocrinologist. he said that I have low cortisol, low progesterone, unusually low testosterone, and elevated TSH?

    my symptoms are sudden weight gain (that stopped, but won't come off), anxiety, tinnitus, brain fog, exhaustion, infrequent period (starting last Dec.) and a few others

    thanks !

    • ANSWER:
      These results, especially the TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) levels, are an indication that a hormone imbalance is most likely going on.

      Some of the symptoms such as the weight gain, and anxiety and irregular periods can be an indication of a thyroid problem called hypothyroidism.

      The endocrinologist will try to help figure out what is going on.

      In the mean time here's the link to a site that may help you find even more information: http://thyroid.about.com

  7. QUESTION:
    what does 0.68 for tsh level mean.my doctor says it is close to hyperthyroid but I have symptoms of hypothyroi?
    I am very overweight and getting worse. My hair is thin. I had problems with my periods for years. I took hormone pills had a d n c and then had a hysterectomy because they couldn't figure out what the problem was.

    • ANSWER:
      It's now more than six years since the experts have established that this new, narrower TSH normal range of 0.3 to 3.0 is a more accurate one, and recommended that it become the standard of practice. Yet, the dithering continues. Some doctors use the new range for diagnosis and therapeutic management -- others refuse to consider anything unless it's marked "High" or "Low" on laboratory reports

      Remember that you can have both hypo and hyper.Heres a statement from someone that had both.
      Both Hashimoto's and Graves' disease antibodies, which puts the thyroid into a push-pull situation, where it cycles up and down through hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism.

      Hashi dominate with Graves' secondary or Graves' dominate with Hashi secondary, are people with equal amounts of both stimulating and blocking TSH receptor antibodies.

      A person may present features of one of these disorders at one time and features of the other at another time. However, they both can't present features of both at the same time. Therefore, treatment is at the moment of the prevailing disorder.

      Some even believe that hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, including Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, as different phases of the same disease. Graves’ disease, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, idiopathic thyroid failure and Hashitoxicosis are all closely associated and sometimes overlapping syndromes that cause symptoms of thyroid disease. .Goe to my source , it really is interesting. I really took time to look this up , so I really hopes this helps.

      Tin

  8. QUESTION:
    Can anyone tell me the whole symptom list of Pan Hypopituitarism?
    My fiancé has it and I wanna know what parts are lack of hormones or just him.

    • ANSWER:
      The list of signs and symptoms mentioned in various sources for Panhypopituitarism includes the 43 symptoms listed below:

      •Thyroid-stimulating hormone deficiency
      •Follicle stimulating hormone deficiency
      •Adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency
      •Luteinizing hormone deficiency
      •Underdeveloped pituitary gland
      •Pituitary hormone deficiency
      •Delayed puberty
      •Short stature
      •Growth hormone deficiency
      •Gonadotropin deficiency
      •Dry skin
      •Constipation
      •Fatigue
      •Increased weight
      •Puberty failure
      •Diabetes insipidus
      •Increased urination
      •Dehydration
      •Increased blood sodium level
      •Increased thirst
      •Night-time bed-wetting
      •Amenorrhea
      •Infertility
      •Sensitivity to cold
      •Weakness
      •Reduced appetite
      •Weight loss
      •Abdominal pain
      •Low blood pressure
      •Headache
      •Visual disturbance
      •Hot flashes
      •Vaginal dryness
      •Pain during sex
      •Male sexual dysfunction
      •Reduced body hair
      •Pallor
      •Waxy skin
      •Loss of female armpit hair
      •Loss of female pubic hair
      •Wrinkled skin
      •Retarded growth
      •Disinterested expression

  9. QUESTION:
    What other disorders have the same symptoms as Polycystic Ovary Syndrome?
    I'm being tested right now for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and other disorders. However, my doctor wouldn't tell me what these other disorders are. What other disorders have the same symptoms as PCOS?

    • ANSWER:
      Women with polycystic ovary syndrome may have any of several signs of varying severity. Criteria for diagnosing the disorder include having at least two of the following indications:

      *Irregular or no menstruation. This is the most common finding in PCOS. Irregular menstruation means having menstrual cycles that occur at intervals longer than 35 days or fewer than eight times a year. The condition may begin in adolescence with the onset of menstruation.
      *Excess androgen. Elevated levels of male hormones may result in physical signs such as long, coarse hair on your face, chest, lower abdomen, back, upper arms or upper legs (hirsutism), acne and male-pattern baldness (alopecia). However, not all women who have polycystic ovary syndrome have physical signs of androgen excess.
      *Enlarged ovaries with multiple cysts. A doctor may detect ovarian cysts by ultrasound. However, a woman may have ovaries with multiple cysts but still not have polycystic ovary syndrome. And a woman with PCOS may have ovaries that appear normal. You must also have abnormal menstrual cycles or excess androgen levels to be diagnosed with PCOS.

      Several other disorders can cause signs and symptoms similar to those of polycystic ovary syndrome:
      Hypothyroidism. In this condition, your body produces too little thyroid hormone, which can lead to an absence of menstruation (amenorrhea).
      Hyperprolactinemia. This condition causes your pituitary gland to produce too much prolactin, a hormone that stimulates the production of breast milk and suppresses ovulation.
      Certain tumors. Tumors of the ovary or adrenal gland can be responsible for excess androgen levels.
      Doctors rule out the above conditions before diagnosing PCOS.
      Many women with polycystic ovary syndrome are obese. The distribution of fat seems to affect the severity of symptoms. One study found that women who have central obesity — fat in the midsection or trunk of the body — have higher androgen, sugar and lipid levels than do women who have accumulated fat in their limbs.
      Other possible conditions associated with polycystic ovary syndrome are:
      Infertility
      Acanthosis nigricans — darkened, velvety skin on the nape of your neck, armpits, inner thighs, vulva or under your breasts
      Chronic pelvic pain

  10. QUESTION:
    What happens if I have a thyroid problem?
    I think I may have this because im always tired and get very very tired easily, im demotivated most or all of the time. If I do have this then I will have to take medication for this, but medications make you fatter and bloated. Any one help, what should I do?

    • ANSWER:
      Common symptoms of hypothyroidism are:

      * Fatigue or lack of energy
      * Weight gain
      * Feeling cold
      * Dry skin and hair
      * Heavy menstrual periods
      * Constipation
      * Slowed thinking

      hyprh401.gif - 10.6 K

      DIAGNOSIS of hypothyroidism is usually straightforward, once it is suspected. Patients with hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto's thyroiditis have an elevated level of serum TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone). However, the rare patient with hypothyroidism due to a pituitary or hypothalamic condition may have a normal or low serum TSH.

      TREATMENT of hypothyroidism consists of taking thyroid hormone in pill form on a daily basis. Symptoms of hypothyroidism should clear up within a few months of starting treatment. Adjustment of the dose of thyroid pills is based upon measurements of serum TSH. Most patients need to take thyroid hormone for life.
      HYPERTHYROIDISM (Overactive Thyroid)

      The most common cause of hyperthyroidism is Graves' disease. This occurs when the body's immune system overstimulates the thyroid.

      Common symptoms of hyperthyroidism are:

      * Jitteriness, shaking, increased nervousness, irritability
      * Rapid heart beat or palpitations
      * Feeling hot
      * Weight loss
      * Fatigue, feeling exhausted
      * More frequent bowel movements
      * Shorter or lighter menstrual periods

  11. QUESTION:
    Is there anyone out there that has overcome an anxiety disorder?
    I have Social Anxiety Disorder. Since discovering I had it my life has slowly been falling apart.
    I have been struggling with it now for about 2 years. In that time I have lost the love of my life, people at work bully me like I'm a freak and I am just so low right now its hard.
    Is there anyone out there who can tell me they have overcome this or anything like this?
    For me it feels like I will be like this forever. Things are really difficult.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, here is my response to someone else here. Hope it helps.

      Hi, sorry to hear of your suffering, I know anxiety can be miserable.

      I suffered from severe anxiety and social anxiety for years and now I am fine. My doctor said it was the worse case he had ever seen, if I can recover so can you.

      I have researched the subject of anxiety and here is what I found and what helped me:

      First if you are having anxiety your brain chemistry is off, period. I triggered panic attacks and horrible anxiety when I am was under a lot of stress. I drank too much coffee, ate way too much sugar and began drinking beer and wine.

      Street drugs, certain medication can do the same thing. These things over stimulate the adrenals and if it goes on too long will produce anxiety.

      If you get too much adrenaline in your system from your adrenals being overstimulated it can cause your brain chemistry to get off track, either too much or too little of the brain chemicals are released and you are off and running with anxiety.

      The neurotransmitter GAMA has a lot to do with anxiety.

      Anxiety is often genetic in nature. My mom and dad had it.

      Anxiety can be greatly helped by Vitamin C because often in an anxiety state the adrenals are exhausted. A good, sugar free vitamin C will help support them. I started with 500mg and worked like a charm. Also a B complex can be helpful as well as a raw adrenal supplement. All of these helped me a great deal when I suffered from anxiety. I simply did not get triggered into an anxiety state when I took the C, it was like a miracle and so simple.

      Also I started taking thyroid hormone, Armour Brand in particular it is closest to nature. It contains T-3 and T-4 components, this is extremely important as most of the thyroid supplements are man made and not as effective. Also those who's thyroid levels don't register low enough often still need it. I was one of these people and when I started taking Armour thyroid was so much better, I can handle stress much better. Many people who are depressed, anxious and show symptoms of mental illness have great improvement with a thyroid supplement. I don't mean to go on and on about this but it is something to take a look at.

      Also the pancreas gets off track because of the increase in adrenaline and can become extremely sensitive to sugar so watch your diet now. Stay away from sugar in general, coffee, fruit, simple carobs and so on. Processed foods will drag you down now. Because the pancreas affects blood sugar which also affects brain chemistry you can get all sorts of weird reactions. The pancreas actually goes into a spasm and stops working very well, you can get really tired and shaky, spacey and not think clearly. I found that a "Castor Oil" pack on the lower left side of the back where the pancreas lies will help it get back on track, do it for 3 nights for 20 minutes each night. Sounds weird and a bit messy but research it online, lots of info on this.

      Remember when the body gets off then the emotions follow. When the emotions get off then the body gets off as well.

      I contacted over 450 doctors and alternative practitioners seeking help over a 20 year period. I found someone who could "muscle test" for the exact supplements I needed to balance back. This is a very common practice among alternative medicine doctors and if you can find the right person can work a miracle.

      Also NMT or Neruomodulation Technique helped a great deal. Not an ad here but just what worked for me.

      Check out Bach Flower Remedies as well, they are amazing. Great for shyness, fear of known things, confidence.

      You can recover and have a great life. Hang in there and don't give up.

  12. QUESTION:
    Can anyone understand these thyroid function test results?
    Hi everyone

    Can you interpret my thyroid results?

    T3 - 6.5
    T4 - 23
    TSH - 0.02

    And what should the levels be??? Thanks
    Thanks for your reply but the results are just printed out on a letter, no other reference figures on it. I think the GP thinks I have borderline hyperthyroidism

    • ANSWER:
      As the other answerer said, you can't fully interpret the results without knowing the reference ranges ('normal' ranges), which vary between labs because they measure things in different ways. However your GP's right - your TSH result would be classified as very low by any lab, and that is the most important one of the three results. TSH is a hormone produced by the pituitary gland (under your brain) to stimulate the thyroid. Your TSH is low, which means your pituitary thinks your thyroid definitely does not need stimulation - basically your thyroid is doing its own thing without being told to. T4 and T3 are the hormones the thyroid is producing. Depending on the lab's range, those results would either be very slightly high, or 'almost' high. So your thyroid isn't going nuts and churning out loads and loads of hormones, but it is a bit more active than it should be.

      There are a few causes for this, so I'm sure your GP will investigate depending on your symptoms and other conditions etc.

  13. QUESTION:
    What does these test results mean? I received a letter from my doctor and this is what is said?
    T4 (Thyroxine), Total 13.4
    T4, Free 157
    T3, Total 5.8

    Please help by explaining.

    • ANSWER:
      Knowing your TSH level would be helpful.

      # Find out your thyroid test results from your doctor's office.
      # If you can, get a hard copy printout for your own review and home medical files.
      # If "normal" or "reference" ranges are not indicated on the lab results, ask your doctor's office to tell you what these ranges are.
      # Note the level of your Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH). At most labs in the U.S., up until late 2002, the normal range is from around 0.5 to 5.5. That range changed to .3 to 3 as of early 2003.
      # If the TSH level is below normal, your doctor may determine that you are hyperthyroid (overactive thyroid.)
      # If the TSH level is above normal, your doctor may determine that you are hypothyroid (underactive thyroid.)
      # If your doctor ran a test called Total T4 or Total Thyroxine, normal range is approximately 4.5 to 12.5. If you had a low reading, and a high TSH, your doctor might consider that indicative of hypothyroidism.
      # If your doctor ran a test called Total T4 or Total Thyroxine, normal range is approximately 4.5 to 12.5. If you had a low reading, and a low TSH, your doctor might look into a pituitary problem.
      # If your doctor ran a test called Free T4, or Free Thyroxine, normal range is approximately 0.7 to 2.0. If your result was less than 0.7, your doctor might consider that indicative of hypothyroidism.
      # If your doctor ran a test called Total T3, normal range is approximately 80 to 220. If your result was less than 80, your doctor might consider that indicative of hypothyroidism.
      # If your doctor ran a test called Free T3, normal range is approximately 2.3 to 4.2. If your result was less than 2.3, your doctor might consider that indicative of hypothyroidism.
      # If your test results come back "normal" but you have many of the symptoms or risk factors for thyroid disease, make sure you ask for an antibodies test. Some doctors believe in treating thyroid symptoms in the presence of elevated antibodies and normal TSH levels.
      # If your test results come back "normal" but you have many of the symptoms or risk factors for thyroid disease, consider going to a reputable holistic M.D. or alternative physician for further interpretation and diagnosis.

  14. QUESTION:
    What do all my symptoms add up to?
    For the last few months I have been feeling really sick. I thought it might be that I am pregnant but i've taken 6 tests that have comeout negative. I am always tired, sleepy, low energy or interest in things, moody/emotional, nauseus (specially in the morning-last week vomited twice). I just can't figure it out. What do i have?

    • ANSWER:
      Low mood will make people say depression...but I would consider doing some reading on 'hormone imbalances'...

      Your symptoms sound like maybe thyroid or adrenal fatigue.

      Those imbalances can cause intestinal and stomach issues... too.

      Thyroid Slowdown: Could Your Thyroid be Underactive?
      It may start with a feeling of tiredness. A regular night’s sleep is no longer enough, and you wake up feeling exhausted. You may be gaining weight, even though you haven’t changed your diet and exercise program. Or you’ve decided to lose some weight, but despite carefully following a diet and exercise plan, the scale isn’t budging an ounce. Perhaps you’re struggling with a case of the blues — along with fuzzy, muddled thinking – and you’re feeling down, or finding it hard to concentrate or remember things.

      It’s tempting for you and your doctor to write off these symptoms as signs of middle age, not enough exercise, lack of sleep, or stress. But for millions of us, these symptoms are actually signs of a common – but often undiagnosed – hormonal deficiency known as hypothyroidism.

      The thyroid – the master gland of metabolism – is located in the neck below and behind the Adam’s apple. In hypothyroidism, the thyroid is underactive, and isn’t producing enough thyroid hormone. Without thyroid hormone, cells and tissues become starved for energy, and the body and its systems slow down.

      Hypothyroidism causes a whole range of symptoms that can include:

      • Extreme or unusual fatigue or exhaustion
      • Depression or moodiness
      • Weight gain with no change in exercise or diet
      • Inability to lose weight despite proper exercise and diet
      • Hair loss from the head, and sometimes the outer edge of the eyebrow
      • Coarse, rough, and/or dry hair
      • Pale, dry, cracked or itchy skin, chronic hives
      • Constipation
      • Menstrual irregularities
      • Infertility or recurrent miscarriage
      • Low sex drive
      • Feeling cold when it’s hot, low body temperature
      • High cholesterol, including levels resistant or unresponsive to drug or dietary treatment
      • Brain fog, difficulty concentrating, memory problems
      • Slow pulse and/or unusually low blood pressure in a non-athlete
      • Irritated eyes, dryness, sensitivity to light
      • Low, husky, and/or hoarse voice
      • Neck enlargement, discomfort, fullness, pressure, difficulty swallowing
      • Muscle and joint aches and pains
      • Puffiness and swelling, especially hands, feet, eyes and face

      Thyroid conditions are common – some experts estimate that close to 60 million Americans have a thyroid problem, and the majority are hypothyroid. Unfortunately, the vast majority of people with thyroid disease also have not been diagnosed or treated.

      When diagnosing hypothyroidism, your doctor should listen carefully to your description of your symptoms. At the same time, in addition to taking a complete personal and family history, your doctor should perform a thorough clinical evaluation. In this exam, the practitioner should:

      • Test your Achilles reflex – the doctor taps on your Achilles tendon along the back of your heel, which causes your calf muscle to contract and your foot to jerk down. A slower than normal reaction suggests hypothyroidism.
      • Measure your heart rate and take a blood pressure reading
      • Palpate your neck and thyroid area, to feel for enlargement of the thyroid, or any lumps and nodules
      • Observe your hair and skin, and look for any swelling or puffiness in face, hands and feet

      Based on these examinations, some doctors can already make a fairly accurate diagnosis. But it is at this point that they vary in how they proceed.

      Some doctors routinely perform a blood test, known as the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) test. This test measures levels of TSH, a pituitary hormone, to assess the thyroid’s function. While many conventional practitioners believe this test to be the “gold standard” for diagnosing thyroid disease, they disagree about how to interpret the results. On one side are the laboratories and doctors who follow the older TSH normal range of approximately 0.5 to 5.0. (Low levels of TSH are indicative of hyperthyroidism, and higher TSH levels are indicative of hypothyroidism.)

      On the other side of the debate are the doctors who adopted new guidelines recommended by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists in 2003. These new guidelines set the TSH normal range from 0.3 to 3.0. Unfortunately, this disagreement among practitioners leaves the estimated 20 million or more Americans with a TSH of between 3.0 and 5.0 in limbo. Their ability to get properly diagnosed and treated depends on finding a doctor and laboratory that follow the new guidelines.

      Other practitioners believe that a TSH test alone is not sufficient for diagnosis, and they conduct additional tests such as Free T4 and Free T3 to evaluate specific thyroid hormone levels. Some doctors run antibody tests to identify autoimmune thyroid disease. Some doctors will treat patients based on abnormalities in these tests, even when TSH is normal.

      Finally, there are holistic and integrative practitioners who believe that patients with a high index of suspicion for thyroid disease, – for example, they have a combination of symptoms, clinical signs, and/or family history – should receive a therapeutic trial of a thyroid hormone replacement. These doctors believe that even if TSH and other test results show “normal” thyroid function, the thyroid may still be underactive. According to these practitioners, a low dose of thyroid hormone may safely reduce or eliminate symptoms in many patients. Since these practitioners have found that a low dose of thyroid hormone is safe for most of their patients, their philosophy is that they owe it to symptomatic patients to conduct such a trial.

      If you have hypothyroidism symptoms or risk factors – family history, neck trauma, radiation exposure to the neck, cigarette smoking are just a few – be sure to have a thorough evaluation by a practitioner who not only understands thyroid disease, but recognizes that thyroid patients are more than just numbers on a lab test, and puts that into practice.

      (March 2006)

      GOOD LUCK! :)

  15. QUESTION:
    Does soy milk encourage cancer cells to form and grow?
    I have read studies both ways, but which is correct? Or is more testing needed still?

    • ANSWER:
      Here are a couple of facts for you:
      Myth: Soy estrogens (isoflavones) are good for you.
      Truth: Soy isoflavones are phyto-endocrine disrupters. At dietary levels, they can prevent ovulation and stimulate the growth of cancer cells. Eating as little as 30 grams (about 4 tablespoons) of soy per day can result in hypothyroidism with symptoms of lethargy, constipation, weight gain and fatigue.

      Myth: Soy foods are safe and beneficial for women to use in their postmenopausal years.
      Truth: Soy foods can stimulate the growth of estrogen-dependent tumors and cause thyroid problems. Low thyroid function is associated with difficulties in menopause.

      Consumption of unfermented soy products is probably not such a good idea. Unfermented soy contains high levels of a number of compounds that can: block the absorption of calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc; stunt growth; and alter hormone levels, disrupting menstruation, lowering testosterone, increasing the risk of breast cancer, and causing thyroid and prostate complications. Unfermented soy includes things like soy milk, soy burgers, soy hot dogs, and tofu.

      Sorry....sounds like your dad is correct!

      Here's the link that provides lots of info about soy:
      http://www.frot.co.nz/dietnet/basics/soy.htm

  16. QUESTION:
    Is there a single medication that can help both depression and high blood pressure?
    I also have anxiety and it would be nice if there was one med for all instead of 2 to 3 different ones.

    • ANSWER:
      Yep. The answer is thyroid medication (not Synthroid). Has been used for all three symptoms for over a 100 years. The thyroid function tests are useless so most people with hypothyroidism are undiagnosed and walking around with fatigue, high blood pressure, DEPRESSION, weigh gain, dry skin, puffiness, high cholesterol, but their doc says their tests are "normal". Find someone who treats to symptoms not blood tests. Good Luck.

      Myth #1: The TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) blood test is the only way to diagnose hypothyroidism/low thyroid.

      Facts: First, there is no perfect test in medicine—not the TSH or any other. Second, nearly a century before the TSH test was developed, doctors made the diagnosis of hypothyroidism without any tests at all. They listened to their patients and examined them. Since then, there have been many tests that have been blindly followed until they proved to be unreliable and were discarded.

      To this day, there are at least three types of hypothyroidism for which the TSH test does not even test. The TSH is not a useful test for hypothyroidism caused by dysfunction of the pituitary gland or of the hypothalamus (part of the brain,) or for hypothyroidism caused by "tissue resistance" to the effects of thyroid hormone.

      My conclusion: The TSH test can miss the diagnosis of hypothy-
      roidism. To most accurately identify hypothyroidism, I start with the approach that has worked for over a century. I listen to the patient and look for evidence of low thyroid function. If the patient appears hypothyroid, I order blood tests including the TSH, but I also (1) check basal body temperature,1 and (2) check the urine thyroid hormone levels.2 I then interpret all test results in the context of the
      individual patient.

      Myth #2: Normalizing the TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) blood test is the best way to treat hypothyroidism.

      Fact:Many studies have shown adjusting thyroid doses to normalize the TSH blood test leaves many patients with symptoms of low thyroid. World-renowned thyroid specialist, Sir Anthony Toft, MD, discussed this sad fact in 2002. In a speech to the British Endocrine Society, Dr. Toft reviewed some of the evidence that demonstrated that the modern TSH-centered approach was ineffective. He concluded, "...the treatment of hypothyroidism is about to come full circle"—going back to the approach that worked so well before all of our modern tests and treatments were invented.3

      My conclusion: Using the patient as my guide, I focus on reversing the signs and symptoms of low thyroid function while avoiding side effects or signs of thyroid excess. When the TSH is normal but the patient continues to be symptomatic, I prefer to err on the side of treating the patient—not normalizing the blood test.

      Myth #3: Thyroid treatment that reduces the TSH to below the normal range (TSH suppression) has been shown to be harmful, causing atrial fibrillation (a heart rhythm abnormality) and bone thinning.

      Facts: When thyroid hormone is given to a patient, TSH levels decrease. Some say that thyroid treatment that reduces the TSH to below the normal range causes bone thinning and atrial fibrillation.

      Before the TSH test was invented, generations of patients flourished on doses of thyroid medicine that routinely suppress the TSH. To this day, patients with thyroid cancer who are given doses to intentionally suppress the TSH, do very well on this regimen. In 2004, after review of the scientific literature, the US Preventive Services Task Force—a leading authority—addressed the question and concluded that despite the multitude of studies, there remains no proof that TSH suppression
      is dangerous.4

      My conclusions: Listen to the patient, examine the patient and adjust treatment until the patient is well. A century of medical experience and scientific evidence indicate that giving a patient enough thyroid hormone to make them well is a reasonable and safe approach. Blood tests, urine tests and tracking body temperatures all provide additional information, but no one test should be blindly followed.

      Myth #4: Natural thyroid extracts are dangerous because they are not regulated and not consistent in dose.

      Fact: Natural thyroid extracts such as Armour Thyroid are FDA approved prescription medications that contain all 4 human thyroid hormones (T1, T2, T3 and T4.) They are prepared in accordance with the U.S. Pharmacopeia.5 Synthetic thyroid extracts, such as levothyroxine contain only T4 and are also FDA approved.

      Ironically, synthetic T4 preparations seem to have had many more problems with dose consistency than has Armour Thyroid. FDA records show repeated problems with potency and consistency for T4 products including Synthroid.6,7

      My conclusion: There is no evidence that natural thyroid extracts such as Armour Thyroid are unsafe or any more dangerous than synthetic thyroid treatments. In fact, my experience is that natural thyroid extracts are much more effective at re

  17. QUESTION:
    Can you pregnant without a thyroid gland?
    I was born wihtout a thyroid and I have to take the generic synthroid pills every day for the rest of my life. I was told that it'll be hard to get pregnant or not being able to get pregnant at all. I have been trying for a year so far and no luck. I'm 18 years old and I don't want to have to adopt a child. I want to have my own children. Please help me! :(
    I'm engaged.. I don't want to wait.

    • ANSWER:
      Simple answer is yes you can get pregnant - but it comes with significant risk to your own health, and the health of the baby. You really should consult with your doctor first before thinking about becoming pregnant, or carrying a baby to term.

      For the first 10-12 weeks of pregnancy, the baby is completely dependent on the mother for the production of thyroid hormone. By the end of the first trimester, the baby’s thyroid begins to produce thyroid hormone on its own. The baby, however, remains dependent on the mother for ingestion of adequate amounts of iodine, which is essential to make the thyroid hormones.

      One major risk is Graves disease. Graves’ disease is an autoimmune disorder caused by the production of antibodies that stimulate thyroid gland referred to as thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins (TSI). These antibodies do cross the placenta and can interact with the baby’s thyroid.

      Graves disease may present initially during the first trimester or may be exacerbated during this time in a woman known to have hyperthyroidism or deficient thyroid hormone production. In addition to the classic symptoms associated with hyperthyroidism, inadequately treated maternal hyperthyroidism can result in early labor and a serious complication known as pre-eclampsia. Additionally, women with active Graves’ disease during pregnancy are at higher risk of developing very severe hyperthyroidism known as thyroid storm.

      Low levels of thyroid hormone can interfere with ovulation, which impairs fertility. In addition, some of the causes of hypothyroidism — such as autoimmune disorder — also impair fertility. Treating hypothyroidism with thyroid hormone replacement therapy may not fully restore fertility.

      Babies born to women with untreated thyroid disease may have a higher risk of birth defects than may babies born to healthy mothers. These children are also more prone to serious intellectual and developmental problems. Infants with untreated hypothyroidism present at birth are at risk of serious problems with both physical and mental development. But if this condition is diagnosed within the first few months of life, the chances of normal development are excellent.

  18. QUESTION:
    What does it mean if my tsh is elevated ?
    Well i wne to get my blood taken because i am on new meds and every thing came back good but it said my tsh is elevated. I want to know what that means.
    Is it something bad or some thing can kill me?lol plz write back.

    • ANSWER:
      Elevated TSH means your thyroid isn't producing enough thyroid hormone and "your thyroid is low"; you are "hypothyroid". Not fatal, fairly common, with symptoms like weight gain, low energy, dry hair, etc. Generally, it's treated with a daily pill, a thyroid supplement. Google "hypothyroid" for more info.
      TSH is "thyroid stimulating hormone". Your body (pituitary gland?)makes it and sends it in the blood to the thyroid gland to tell it you don't have enough thyroid hormone (that is, it "stimulates the thyroid"). Ideally, the thyroid responds right away, and the TSH goes down to normal. If it doesn't respond, your thyroid level stays low and the TSH stays elevated.

  19. QUESTION:
    Why am I always colder than everyone else?
    For some reason, I always feel colder than everyone else. It may be 90 degrees (Fahrenheit) outside, but I could wear all black and a hoodie and not even sweat. Whenever the AC is on I start freezing in my own house. Am I naturally colder than other people or something? I could even exercise for an hour or two and not break a sweat and not get hot.

    • ANSWER:
      Your iron levels are probably way too low. Have a doctor check your blood.

      "Here are some of the more common reasons for feeling colder than normal:

      Low body weight. Both fat thickness and muscle mass assist in keeping us warm. Muscle activity generates heat and fat acts as insulation. If you have lost a lot of weight recently or you have always been thin, you might be sensitive to ambient temperatures that would be comfortable for most people.

      Skipping meals. Some people get cold when they skip meals or take in too few calories. The body conserves energy and produces less heat in response to fasting.

      Being overly tired. Not getting enough sleep and feeling tired all the time may be contributing to the cold feeling.

      An underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). Feeling cold can be a symptom of hypothyroidism. A simple blood test for TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) can determine if you have this problem.

      Low red blood cell count (anemia). While anemia can cause a person to feel colder than other people in the same room, it would be unusual for it to cause the extreme cold feeling you describe. Again, it's easy to check for anemia with a simple blood test.

      Raynaud's phenomenon. The normal response to cold temperatures is to shunt blood away from the skin to keep the internal organs warm. In people with Raynaud's phenomenon, that natural response is extreme. The tiny blood vessels get severely narrowed and markedly reduce blood flow to the skin, most often in the fingers and toes. One or more digit turns white or blue, temporarily. People with Raynaud's tend to be much more sensitive to even minor drops in air temperature than other people. In addition to wearing gloves and thick socks, they need to keep their core body temperature up by wearing lots of layers of clothing."

  20. QUESTION:
    Thyroid abnormal labs what does it mean?
    I have Thyroglobulin 201 (normal 0-74) and TSH 0.007 , normal t3 and t 4 endo doctor says it is just stress , my family dr says it's hyperthyroidism and need treat. Anyone here knows more about that? I am confused!

    • ANSWER:
      Most people with low TSH have hyperthyroidism but along with that your T3 and T4 levels should be high, T3 & T4 free values may be a better indicator.

      Rarely there is a problem with the pituitary gland, TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) is produced by the pituitary. This can cause hypothyroidism, but you would also have low T3 and T4 values.

      Did I add to the confusion? I would look at your symptoms, ask your doctor if an MRI of your pituitary is needed. I think the pituitary may be the problem, whether stress is the cause or not.

      http://www.labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/thyroglobulin/test.html

      Small amounts of thyroglobulin are normal in patients with normal thyroid function. Patients with an enlarged thyroid gland (goiter), thyroiditis (inflamed thyroid), or hyperthyroidism may have elevated thyroglobulin levels, although the test is not routinely ordered with these conditions.

      I am not a doctor an my opinions should not be taken as gospel. I had my thyroid removed after cancer and my knowledge is limited.

  21. QUESTION:
    How do drugs work on relieving cardiac arrythmias?

    • ANSWER:
      To diagnose a heart arrhythmia, your doctor may ask about or test for conditions that may trigger your arrhythmia, such as heart disease or a problem with your thyroid gland. Your doctor may also perform heart monitoring tests specific to arrhythmias.

      If you have an arrhythmia, treatment may or may not be necessary. Usually it's required only if the arrhythmia is causing significant symptoms or if it's putting you at risk of a more serious arrhythmia or arrhythmia complication.

      If slow heartbeats (bradycardias) don't have a cause that can be corrected such as low thyroid hormone levels or a drug side effect doctors often treat them with a pacemaker. A pacemaker is a small, battery-powered device that's usually implanted near your collarbone. One or more electrode-tipped wires run from the pacemaker through your blood vessels to your inner heart. If your heart rate is too slow or if it stops, the pacemaker sends out electrical impulses that stimulate your heart to beat at a steady, proper rate.

      Many types of tachycardias respond well to anti-arrhythmic medications. Though they don't cure the problem, they can reduce episodes of tachycardia or slow down the heart when an episode occurs. Some medications can slow down your heart so much that you may need a pacemaker. It's very important to take any anti-arrhythmic medication exactly as directed by your doctor, in order to avoid complications.
      Many arrhythmias can be blamed on underlying heart disease, so your doctor may suggest that, in addition to other treatments, you make lifestyle changes that will keep your heart as healthy as possible.

      Take care as always!

  22. QUESTION:
    Why do I sweat this much and how do I stop it?
    For my personal style, I straighten my hair. But it's hard to keep it perfect because I sweat a lot! And I'm not overweight, actually I'm underweight and it's so annoying when I have to walk a normal lenght distance with my friends and I end up completely sweaty... I've tried strong desodorants, small clothes and pony tails to avoid heat but I still can't get rid of this problem. Help please.

    • ANSWER:
      You have between 2 million and 5 million eccrine sweat glands. When your body temperature rises, your autonomic nervous system stimulates these glands to secrete fluid onto the surface of your skin, where it cools your body as it evaporates. This fluid (perspiration) is composed mainly of water and salt (sodium chloride) and contains trace amounts of other electrolytes — substances that help regulate the balance of fluids in your body — as well as substances such as urea.

      Apocrine glands, on the other hand, secrete a fatty sweat directly into the tubule of the gland. When you're under emotional stress, the wall of the tubule contracts and the sweat is pushed to the surface of your skin where bacteria begin breaking it down. Most often, it's the bacterial breakdown of apocrine sweat that causes an odor.

      A number of factors can affect how much you sweat as well as your sweat's smell. Certain foods, drugs or medical conditions can cause excessive sweating, whereas drugs or conditions may interfere with your ability to perspire normally.

      -Excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis)
      Some people sweat more than others for no apparent reason. But some factors may make you sweat heavily. These include:
      -Heredity. Some people inherit a tendency to sweat excessively, especially on their palms and the soles of their feet.
      Certain foods and beverages. Drinking hot beverages and those that contain caffeine or alcohol can make you sweat. Eating spicy foods can, too.
      -Certain drugs. Drugs that can cause excessive sweating include some antipsychotic medications used to treat mental disorders, morphine and excess doses of the thyroid hormone thyroxine. Analgesics, such as aspirin and acetaminophen (Tylenol), also increase sweating.
      -Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). This occurs when the level of sugar in your blood drops below a certain level. It's most common in people with diabetes who take insulin or oral medications that enhance the action of insulin. Early signs and symptoms include sweating, shakiness, weakness, hunger, dizziness and nausea. Some people may develop low blood sugar after eating, especially if they've had stomach or intestinal surgery. In rare cases, your body may produce too much of the pancreatic hormone insulin, leading to low blood sugar.
      -Fevers. Fever occurs when your temperature rises above its normal range. You may have a fever with many types of bacterial and viral infections. When your body temperature finally begins to return to normal, known as "breaking of the fever," you may sweat profusely, which is your body's way of dissipating the excess heat. Shaking chills after the fever are your body's attempt to raise its core temperature. Repeated episodes of fever followed by sweating and chills may indicate a serious infection or other illness.
      -Overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism). Sometimes the thyroid gland produces excess amounts of the hormone thyroxine. This can cause a number of signs and symptoms, including weight loss, a rapid or irregular heartbeat, nervousness and increased sensitivity to heat. It may also cause you to perspire much more than normal.
      -Heart attack. This occurs when a loss of blood supply damages or destroys part of your heart muscle. The signs and symptoms of a heart attack include pressure; fullness or squeezing pain in your chest that lasts for a few minutes or pain that extends beyond your chest to your shoulder, arm or back; shortness of breath; and intense sweating. If you experience these symptoms, get immediate medical care. Every minute counts during a heart attack.

      -The other reasons are malaria, leukemia, menopause, etc which I don't think it is.

      Not to freak you out but I think if it's really becoming a problem and you can't live your daily life because sweating so much is embarrassing you, definitely see a doctor. I think it's probably a thyroid problem or diet problem rather than anything else, but only a doctor can really figure out what the problem is, or if there is a problem.

  23. QUESTION:
    how do you get rid of puffy eyes?
    My eyes are always puffy. . . . like there is puffyness under my eyes. Like bags...but i'm not exactly sure what its from or what it even is. It sticks out a lot when i smile and its annoying. How do you get rid of the puffyness under your eyes?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of Puffy or Swollen Eyes:
      Puffiness or swelling of the upper and lower eyelids, usually in the morning.
      Occasionally accompanied by itching and/or redness.
      Not able to open or close the eyes.
      1. Common Causes of Puffy Eyes:
      Dehydration. When the body gets dehydrated it begins storing up water, which can cause puffy eyes.
      Diet. Drinking alcohol or eating salty foods before going to sleep. Alcohol can cause puffy eyes because it lowers anti-diuretic hormones (ADH) in the body, but the levels will normalize and the puffiness will usually subside at about the same time your hangover subsides.
      Insufficient sleep.
      Allergies. If your puffy eyes are accompanied by redness and itching, the cause may be associated with an allergy. Possible contributing factors include feather pillows, linen fabric, face-creams, dust, pollen, or food.
      Aging. As you get older the skin begins to loose elasticity, causing swollen eyes.
      Hormonal changes. The days just before and during menstruation cause hormone levels to fluctuate, this can result in water retention around the eyelids.
      High blood pressure, which pushes fluids into the tissue around the eyes, can result in swelling.
      Eyelid dermatitis, a rash on the skin which just affects the eyelids, that is usually caused by an allergic reaction to make-up or skin-care products.
      Possible diseases.
      Blepharitis, or inflammation of the eyelid
      Orbital cellulitis, an infection of the orbital tissue
      Chalazions, small tumors on the eyelid that are benign
      Kidney infections
      Thyroid problems
      Drugs. Drugs such as lithium that cause the thyroid to become less productive can also result in swollen eyes.
      Heredity.
      2. Preventing Puffy Eyes:
      Stay hydrated!!! If you are thirsty, you are dehydrated. When properly hydrated, your urine will be nearly clear. (Note that some drugs and foods can alter the color of your urine.)
      Lower your salt intake. The body can only store salt in fluid suspension - which will gather in the skin around your eyes. (Bonus: Lowering your salt consumption can improve your overall health.)
      Never sleep wearing eye make-up. Regardless of how tired you may be, always use an eye make-up remover and continue until the cotton ball or pad shows no signs of make-up. Use a cotton pad rather than a tissue because it is less irritating. Removing eye make-up will prevent it from entering the eyelid and causing irritation.
      Beware of bacteria. Speaking of eye make-up…Do not use mascara or any other eye product that is older than a few months. Bacteria that have grown in the make-up would love a new home in your eyes, and will cause your eyelids to swell. On this note it is probably a good idea not to share your eye products with anyone else either.
      Be sure you get enough quality, regular sleep.
      Sleep with your head elevated to allow better circulation and prevent fluid from collecting around your eyes.
      Sleep on your back so that gravity does not route fluid directly to your eyes.
      3. How to Get Rid of Puffy Eyes:
      There are many methods for preventing and eliminating swelling of the eyes. Some however, will require time and patience before you see results. Following are some natural remedies for puffy eyes.

      Getting Rid of Puffy Eyes:
      Wear a mask that is filled with cold water or gel for a few minutes when you wake up in the morning.
      Wrap pieces of ice in paper towels and place them on your eyelids for a few minutes. The cold will reduce the swelling.
      Keep your eye creams in the refrigerator. The cool cream will help reduce your puffy eyes. When applying the cream, gently tap it onto your eyelid with your ring finger, so as to stimulate fluid drainage.
      Keep two teaspoons in the refrigerator and when you have an attack of the swollen eyelids; rest them on your eyelids for a minimum of one minute or until they warm up.
      Soak cotton-wool pads in a bowl of ice-cold milk and then squeeze most of the liquid out. Place the pads on your eyes and repeat as they warm up for about 15 minutes. This will also brighten the white in your eye.
      Dip cotton balls in ice water, and then squeeze the water out. Apply the cotton balls to your eyes for 5-10 minutes.
      Place black or chamomile teabags soaked in cold water on your eyelids for 15 minutes. The tannic acid in tea will constrict the blood vessels and reduce inflammation. To accelerate drainage, gently press from the inside corner to the outside corner of the swollen eye.
      Place slices of cucumber, potatoes, or apple over the puffy eyelids for 10-15 minutes. Potatoes will reduce dark circles under the eyes and apples have pectin which aids in anti-oxidation.
      Give your eyes a salt bath by soaking cotton pads in a saline solution or a solution of one teaspoon of salt in one pint of hot water. Place the pads on your puffy eyelids for a few minutes.
      Taking over the counter diuretics can help reduce fluid retention, especially if you experience bloating before your period. (Note: Diuretics also lower your blood pressure, so be sure to have yours checked before going this route.)
      Apply a hemorrhoid cream to the puffy area around the puffy eye, being EXTREMELY CAREFUL not to get any in your eye. Be sure to look for a cream that contains yeast and shark’s liver oil.

      Good luck!

  24. QUESTION:
    how do you know if you have a thyroid disease?
    just wondering because my aunt has one but no one in my immediate family did. but what are the physical and emotional symptoms? my psych knew my aunt had one and he wants me to get tested just to rule it out but my hair and skin have never thinned, i am fine with weight it's never changed unless i worked out and tried to lose weight then i could, i don't really have sleeping problems, my neck isn't sore and i don't have chronic pains.

    • ANSWER:
      If you have high levels of thyroid hormone (thyrotoxicity), symptoms usually start really suddenly and can be very dramatic: weight loss, high resting pulse (at least over 80, but definitely an increase), tremor, anxiety, thinning hair, diarrhea, etc. Thyrotoxicity can cause major psychiatric problems, but it usually has pretty dramatic symptoms so unless the psychiatric problems are really major, the thyrotoxicity is rarely something they miss.
      I had "mild" thyrotoxicity, and that caused me to lose 22 pounds (from 119 to 97 lb), shake all over (even my tongue shook if I stuck it out), have panic attacks, thinning hair, and more.

      But low levels of thyroid hormone (hypothyroidism) are about ten times more common and are much more likely to come on gradually and have more subtle symptoms, such as tiredness, slower metabolism, depression, constipation. This is more often missed, and is more controversial because it's hard to figure out which cases are really hypothyroid and should be treated, and which ones shouldn't be treated.

      With both, you are likely to have an enlarged thyroid (it's at the base of your neck and moves a little when you swallow). Both are tested for with a TSH level (a blood draw) that measures how much of the hormone that stimulates the thyroid your brain is making. If you are at high risk for thyroid disease for a reason such as having a related autoimmune disease, or maybe a relative, I don't know, they screen for risk of thyroid disease by testing for thyroid antibodies (also a blood draw). If those are positive, and TSH is normal, you are likely to develop thyroid disease in the future. But it is possible to develop thyroid disease without having abnormal thyroid antibodies- I did.

      Most people with thyroid disease don't have a painful thyroid (though some do), it's more often enlarged but not painful. Hair and skin changes are much more noticeable with hyperthyroidism only, not hypothyroidism. Hypothyroid people do tend to want to sleep more, while hyperthyroidism makes it hard to sleep. Pain is not a prominent feature of hypo or hyperthyroidism.

  25. QUESTION:
    can lower testosterone levels cause a weaker immune system?
    i'm 20, i've lost my appetite, i'm more depressed and i have an almost diminished sex drive. i am also gaining weight abnormally.

    and more recently for the last few weeks i've been getting ill (colds and flu's) every 4-5 days.
    could all of these symptoms be connected
    how can i stop this from happening.

    • ANSWER:
      As some have said, these symptoms can definitely be related to low testosterone, though they might be accounted for by other hormonal imbalances. Confusingly, illness itself lowers testosterone (which is one reason why a single test result of low testosterone is considered insufficient without another test confirming low levels). Additionally, testosterone has been used by HIV+/AIDS patients to increase immune function; it can often stimulate the production of more T cells.

      Someone spoke of a chemical imbalance in the brain. It's actually very difficult to establish the concentration of chemicals in the brain (we can measure how much our bodies excrete [via 24 hour urine test], as well as how much is in the blood or spinal cord, but at best we can speculate the concentration of chemicals in the brain).
      However, testosterone does affect & is affected by a host of other hormones/neurotransmitters/immune related chemicals, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, thyroid hormones, cortisol, estrogen, aldosterone, DHEA, etc. You get the picture- it's a long list of chemicals that can produce a cascade or domino effect.

      Depression itself can affect functions that are considered part of the domain of testosterone (erectile function, sex drive, appetite, fat burning & muscle building, etc.) & can raise or lower cortisol, which can affect testosterone. It's worth requesting that your doctor test your testosterone levels (both free & total), as well as your thyroid hormones (particularly T4 & T3 but even better to test free T4 & free T3). Doc can draw the blood for these tests in a single sitting.

      Many men are given antidepressants when in point of fact they have low testosterone & are only medicating the symptom while masking the problem. That was how my docs tried to handle the problem at first. I belong to a group that deals with testosterone related issues & testosterone replacement: (http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/hypogonadism2/ )

  26. QUESTION:
    What is a thyroid problem and how does one know if they have that issue?

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism refers to a decrease in the function of the thyroid gland and, thus,low levels of thyroid hormones in the body. The thyroid gland is located in the front of the neck just below the larynx (voice box). This gland secretes several hormones such as thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), and calcitonin. These hormones are produced under the regulation of pituitary gland in the brain. Thyroid hormone regulates several body functions. It is important in maintaining normal metabolism and also helps maintain normal cholesterol balance, heart and brain function. Almost every system of the body is affected by low levels of thyroid hormone.

      Hypothyroidism is a common thyroid gland disorder and is more prevalent in women. Usually, patients with mild disease feel entirely well. However, if not treated pronounced symptoms may appear.
      Hypothyroidism is most commonly caused by an immune process in which the body produces antibodies which attack the thyroid gland. Over years this causes failure of the thyroid gland to produce normal amounts of thyroid hormone. One of the most common type of this autoimmune conditions is known as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Less commonly, it may occur following surgery to remove the thyroid gland or medications given to destroy or control an overactive thyroid.

      In this the body produces autoantibodies that attack and shut down production of thyroid hormone.

      In some cases the pituitary gland fails to secrete thyroid stimulating hormone. This is called secondary hypothyroidism. This generally occurs due to the presence of a pituitary tumour. Both T4 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) are low in this condition.
      The diagnosis of hypothyroidism is based on a detailed chemical history and physical examination. Physical examination may reveal:

      Abnormal mental function

      Hair, skin and nail changes

      Puffiness and swelling of the face and limbs

      Slow muscle reflexes

      Slow heart rate

      Low blood pressure and low temperature

      Although the thyroid gland may be enlarged, in most cases it may not be felt. Laboratory tests to determine thyroid function include estimation of the blood levels of thyroid hormones, T4 and the T3

      Additional laboratory tests may include:

      Cholesterol levels

      Liver enzyme test

      Serum prolactin

      Blood glucose

      Complete blood count

      The anti-thyroid antibodies can also be measured to confirm the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroiditis.

  27. QUESTION:
    Does soy and curry really stop puberty?
    I read somewhere that soy and curry stop puberty so you grow taller, is it true?

    • ANSWER:
      stopping puberty would mean you would it would stunt your growth, and yes it does!

      Here are a couple of facts for you:
      Myth: Soy estrogens (isoflavones) are good for you.
      Truth: Soy isoflavones are phyto-endocrine disrupters. At dietary levels, they can prevent ovulation and stimulate the growth of cancer cells. Eating as little as 30 grams (about 4 tablespoons) of soy per day can result in hypothyroidism with symptoms of lethargy, constipation, weight gain and fatigue.

      Myth: Soy foods are safe and beneficial for women to use in their postmenopausal years.
      Truth: Soy foods can stimulate the growth of estrogen-dependent tumors and cause thyroid problems. Low thyroid function is associated with difficulties in menopause.

      Consumption of unfermented soy products is probably not such a good idea. Unfermented soy contains high levels of a number of compounds that can: block the absorption of calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc; stunt growth; and alter hormone levels, disrupting menstruation, lowering testosterone, increasing the risk of breast cancer, and causing thyroid and prostate complications. Unfermented soy includes things like soy milk, soy burgers, soy hot dogs, and tofu.

      Sorry....sounds like your dad is correct!

      Here's the link that provides lots of info about soy:
      http://www.frot.co.nz/dietnet/basics/soy.htm

  28. QUESTION:
    what causes women to be unable to reproduce?
    /symptoms.

    i tried googling it, but nothing came up.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common causes of female infertility:

      Tubal damage: Inflammation of the fallopian tube from an STD makes the fertilized egg unable to make its way through the fallopian tube to implant in the uterus (ectopic pregnancy).

      Endometriosis: the uterine tissue grows outside of the uterus like on the fallopian tubes. The tissue acts like the period and bleeds in sync with the lining of the uterus each month, which can lead to scarring and inflammation.

      Sometimes infertility is caused by ovulation disorders. Disruption in the part of the brain that regulates ovulation can cause low levels hormones. That could be caused from injury, tumors, excessive exercise and starvation.

      High prolactin (the hormone that stimulates breast milk production) in women who aren't pregnant or nursing may affect ovulation. This can be from a pituitary tumor or some drugs can elevate levels of prolactin.

      Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) your body produces too much testoserone which affects ovulation. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance and obesity.

      Early menopause (the absence of periods and the early dying of ovarian follicles before age 35) Certain conditions are associated with early menopause, including immune system diseases (AIDS), radiation or chemotherapy treatment, and smoking.

      Benign uterine fibroids are common in women in their 30s. They may cause infertility by blocking the fallopian tubes.

      Pelvic adhesions are scar tissue that bind organs after pelvic infection, appendicitis, or abdominal or pelvic surgery.

      Medications.

      Thyroid problems.

      Cancer

      Excessive caffeine consumption reduces fertility in the female.

      I know all this because my husband and I have been trying for 4 years.

  29. QUESTION:
    Can someone please evaluate my thyroid levels?
    Can someone tell me if these are healthy ranges for my thyroid profile----
    T3- 32.2 T4-- 8.8 T7-- 2.83 ans TSH-- 7.7

    thank you!!!!
    I'm just asking for a simple and quick opinion. I am still in contact with my doctor, i would just like to hear some other inputs, that is all i was asking for, not a lecture.

    • ANSWER:
      Assuming you had a blood test ordered by your doctor heshould have reviewed and reported back the results noting if there were any issues. The internet is the last place you should be looking as google or yahoo does not replace a doctorate degree.

      Here's How:

      Find out your thyroid test results from your doctor's office.
      If you can, get a hard copy printout for your own review and home medical files.
      If "normal" or "reference" ranges are not indicated on the lab results, ask your doctor's office to tell you what these ranges are.
      Note the level of your Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH). At most labs in the U.S., up until late 2002, the normal range is from around 0.5 to 5.5. That range changed to .3 to 3 as of early 2003.
      If the TSH level is below normal, your doctor may determine that you are hyperthyroid (overactive thyroid.)
      If the TSH level is above normal, your doctor may determine that you are hypothyroid (underactive thyroid.)
      If your doctor ran a test called Total T4 or Total Thyroxine, normal range is approximately 4.5 to 12.5. If you had a low reading, and a high TSH, your doctor might consider that indicative of hypothyroidism.
      If your doctor ran a test called Total T4 or Total Thyroxine, normal range is approximately 4.5 to 12.5. If you had a low reading, and a low TSH, your doctor might look into a pituitary problem.
      If your doctor ran a test called Free T4, or Free Thyroxine, normal range is approximately 0.7 to 2.0. If your result was less than 0.7, your doctor might consider that indicative of hypothyroidism.
      If your doctor ran a test called Total T3, normal range is approximately 80 to 220. If your result was less than 80, your doctor might consider that indicative of hypothyroidism.
      If your doctor ran a test called Free T3, normal range is approximately 2.3 to 4.2. If your result was less than 2.3, your doctor might consider that indicative of hypothyroidism.
      If your test results come back "normal" but you have many of the symptoms or risk factors for thyroid disease, make sure you ask for an antibodies test. Some doctors believe in treating thyroid symptoms in the presence of elevated antibodies and normal TSH levels.
      If your test results come back "normal" but you have many of the symptoms or risk factors for thyroid disease, consider going to a reputable holistic M.D. or alternative physician for further interpretation and diagnosis.

  30. QUESTION:
    AT PRESENT MY TSH LEVEL IS >150 WHAT IS THE RISK WILL HAPPEN IMMEIDATE REPLY NEEDED?
    YESTERDAY I TESTED THYROID IN BLOOD THE READING SHOWS T3 AS 64.89, T4 AS 2.20, AND TSH AS >150. PLEASE GIVE YOUR VALUABLE SUGGESTIONS AND WHAT ARE THE MEDICINES I HAVE TO TAKE FOR EARLY RECOVERIES

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced by and stored in the pituitary gland, which is located beneath the brain. The release of TSH into the bloodstream stimulates the thyroid gland to release its hormones, called thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3).

      When the pituitary gland detects that thyroid hormone levels are too low, it secretes more TSH. If the pituitary gland detects too much thyroid hormone, it releases less TSH.

      Thyroid hormone tests are blood tests that check how well the thyroid gland is working.

      Normal
      Normal values may vary from lab to lab. Results are usually available within a few days.

      Labs generally measure free T4 (FT4) levels, but also may measure total thyroxine (T4) and T3 uptake (T3U). Results of these thyroid hormone tests may be compared to your thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) results.

      Thyroid hormone tests Total thyroxine (T4): 11.8–22.6 micrograms per deciliter (mcg/dL) or 152–292 nanomoles per liter (nmol/L) in newborns up to 14 days old

      6.4–13.3 mcg/dL (83–172 nmol/L) in babies and older children

      5.4–11.5 mcg/dL (57–148 nmol/L) in adults

      Free thyroxine (FT4): 0.7–2.0 ng/dL nanograms per deciliter (ng/dL) or 10–26 picomoles per liter (pmol/L)

      Total triiodothyronine (T3): 32–250 ng/dL (0.49–3.85 nmol/L) in newborns up to 14 days old

      82–245 ng/dL (1.3–3.8 nmol/L) in babies and older children

      80–200 ng/dL (1.2–3.1 nmol/L) in adults

      Free triiodothyronine (FT3): 260–480 pg/dL (4.0–7.4 pmol/L)

      Free thyroxine index (FTI): 1.5–4.5 (index)

      Many conditions can change thyroid hormone levels. Your doctor will talk with you about any abnormal results that may be related to your symptoms and past health.

      High values
      High thyroid hormone levels (hyperthyroidism) may be caused by:

      Diseases of the thyroid gland, such as Graves' disease, thyroiditis, or a goiter that contains one or more abnormal growths (nodules).
      Taking too much thyroid medicine.
      Low values
      Low thyroid hormone levels (hypothyroidism) may be caused by:

      Thyroid disease, such as thyroiditis.
      Pituitary gland disease.
      Destruction of the thyroid gland by surgery or radiation

      Reasons you may not be able to have the test or why the results may not be helpful include:

      Taking certain medicines, such as:
      Corticosteroids, estrogen, progesterone, or birth control pills.
      Blood-thinning medicines such as aspirin, heparin, or warfarin (Coumadin).
      Antiseizure medicines such as Dilantin or Tegretol.
      Heart medicines such as amiodarone or propranolol.
      Lithium.
      Having recently had an X-ray test that uses contrast material.
      Being pregnant.

  31. QUESTION:
    What r the symptoms of low tsh I am on thyroxine and have had my thyroid removed my tsh is 0.05 ?

    • ANSWER:
      The thyroid helps control a number of metabolic functions, including temperature regulation, reproductive function, weight and heart rate, among others. Thyroid stimulating hormone, produced by the pituitary gland, tells the thyroid to increase production of thyroid hormones T3 and T4 much like a thermostat tells the furnace to turn on when heat levels drop. When TSH levels are low, T3 and T4 levels are usually high. Low TSH levels are usually associated with hyperthyroidism, which causes a number of symptoms. Symptoms of low TSH are not always easily recognized, particularly in the elderly.
      Causes
      Low TSH levels usually occur because the thyroid is producing larger than normal amounts of T3 and T4. Symptoms associated with low TSH levels are caused by the increased levels of thyroid hormones. The excess thyroid hormone production increases the metabolic effects that come under the thyroid's control.
      Types
      Low TSH levels can occur because of disease in the pituitary or the thyroid. If damage affects the pituitary, it can't manufacture TSH, so levels drop. More often, damage occurs to the thyroid, and it produces too much T3 and T4. Low levels of TSH from pituitary disease causes fewer problems than low TSH related to thyroid disease. Graves' disease, the most common cause of hyperthyroidism, occurs when the thyroid increases in size and produces large amounts of thyroid hormones. The pituitary turns off TSH production when thyroid hormone levels rise.
      Symptoms
      Metabolic processes speed up when TSH levels fall due to thyroid damage. Symptoms include fast heart rate, weight loss, increased appetite, increased sensitivity to heat and rapid peristalsis, or movement of waste, through the intestine, which often causes diarrhea. Fatigue, weakness and difficulty sleeping often occur, along with increased anxiety, nervousness, restlessness and irritability. Eyes may bulge outward and double vision or blurred vision may occur.
      Treatment
      The symptoms of low TSH levels are treated by medications to lower levels of T3 and T4, which then allows the pituitary to begin producing TSH again to control thyroid hormone production. Radioactive iodine shrinks the thyroid gland, while anti-thyroid medications block the amount of thyroid hormones produced by the thyroid. Medications can take several months to work and may need to be continued permanently. Anti-thyroid medications can seriously damage the liver, MayoClinic.com warns. Surgical removal of part of the thyroid is recommended for people who don't respond well to or who can't take anti-thyroid drugs or iodine. Between 2 and 16 percent of people who have surgery experience a recurrence of symptoms, The Merck Manuals Online Medical Library states.
      Complications
      Symptoms of low TSH and hyperthyroidism can lead to serious complications. Heart complications such as atrial fibrillation, a quivering of the atria, the top chambers of the heart, rather than a coordinated beating can reduce blood flow through the heart. Congestive heart may occur if blood backs up in the heart and lungs. Thyrotoxic crisis, a severe exacerbation of untreated or uncontrolled hyperthyroidism, causes high fever, weakness, psychosis and coma followed by cardiovascular collapse and shock Death can occur as a result.

      Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/240167-symptoms-of-low-tsh-levels/#ixzz20xevuTA3
      good luck and God bless you

  32. QUESTION:
    what is the difference between the symptoms of PCOS and pituitary tumor?

    • ANSWER:
      Signs and symptoms
      Common symptoms of PCOS include

      Oligomenorrhea, amenorrhea - irregular, few, or absent menstrual periods; cycles that do occur may comprise heavy bleeding (heavy bleeding is also an early warning sign of endometrial cancer, for which women with PCOS are at higher risk)
      Infertility, generally resulting from chronic anovulation (lack of ovulation)
      Elevated serum (blood) levels of androgens (male hormones), specifically testosterone, androstenedione, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), causing hirsutism and occasionally masculinization
      Central obesity - "apple-shaped" obesity centered around the lower half of the torso
      Androgenic alopecia (male-pattern baldness)
      Acne, oily skin, seborrhea
      Acanthosis nigricans (dark patches of skin, tan to dark brown or black)
      Acrochordons (skin tags) - tiny flaps of skin
      Prolonged periods of PMS-like symptoms (bloating, mood swings, pelvic pain, backaches)
      Sleep apnea
      Mild symptoms of hyperandrogenism, such as acne or hyperseborrhea, are frequent in adolescent girls, and are often associated with irregular menstrual cycles. In most instances, these symptoms are transient and only reflect the immaturity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovary axis during the first years following menarche. [1]

      Signs are:

      Multiple cysts on the ovaries (one form of ovarian cyst). Sonographically they may look like a string of pearls.
      Enlarged ovaries, generally 1.5 to 3 times larger than normal, resulting from multiple cysts
      Thickened, smooth, pearl-white outer surface of ovary
      The ratio of LH (Luteinizing hormone) to FSH (Follicle stimulating hormone) is greater than 1:1, as tested on Day 3 of the menstrual cycle.
      High levels of testosterone.
      Low levels of sex hormone binding globulin.
      Hyperinsulinemia

      Signs and symptoms
      Pituitary tumors that produce hormones are called functioning tumors. Tumors that don't produce hormones are known as nonfunctioning pituitary tumors.

      Different types of functioning tumors can develop in your pituitary gland, each causing specific signs and symptoms:

      Adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing tumors. These pituitary tumors produce the hormone adrenocorticotropin, which stimulates your adrenal glands to make the hormone cortisol. When your adrenal glands produce too much cortisol, a condition called Cushing's syndrome occurs. Signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome may include weight gain around your midsection and upper back, exaggerated facial roundness, a characteristic hump on the upper part of your back, high blood pressure, muscle weakness and thinning of your skin.
      Growth hormone-producing tumors. These tumors produce excess growth hormone. The physical effects from excess growth hormone (acromegaly) may include coarsened facial features, enlarged hands and feet, high blood pressure and heart problems. Accelerated and excessive growth (gigantism) may occur in children.
      Prolactin-producing tumors. Overproduction of prolactin from a pituitary tumor (prolactinoma) can cause a decrease in normal levels of sex hormones — estrogen in women and testosterone in men. Excessive prolactin in the blood (hyperprolactinemia) can affect men and women differently.

      In women, prolactinoma may cause irregular menstrual periods (oligomenorrhea), lack of menstrual periods (amenorrhea) and milky discharge from the breasts (galactorrhea).

      In men, a prolactin-producing tumor may cause male hypogonadism, which may involve signs and symptoms such as enlarged breasts (gynecomastia), erectile dysfunction (ED) or impotence, infertility, decrease in body hair, and loss of interest in sexual activity.

      Thyroid-stimulating hormone-producing tumors. When a pituitary tumor overproduces thyroid-stimulating hormone, your thyroid gland makes too much of the hormone thyroxine. This is a rare cause of hyperthyroidism, or overactive thyroid disease. Hyperthyroidism can accelerate your body's metabolism, causing sudden weight loss, a rapid or irregular heartbeat, and nervousness or irritability.
      Functioning and nonfunctioning pituitary tumors may cause other signs and symptoms, including:

      Headache
      Vision changes, such as decreased peripheral vision or double vision
      Seizures
      Clear, watery nasal drainage
      Hair loss
      Cold intolerance
      Constipation
      Irritability
      Weakness
      Fatigue
      Nausea
      Vomiting
      Low blood pressure
      Unintended weight loss or gain

  33. QUESTION:
    if your Dr just tests your TSH level and it is normal, but not the others, can you still have hyperthyroidism.?
    i have all the symptoms, but the only test he did was a TSH level. what about the others like t3 t4 ect....

    • ANSWER:
      TSH is a hormone that is actually secreted by the pituitary gland. Thyroid stimulating hormone, or TSH is secreted to make the thyroid work properly. If your TSH levels are high, it means that the pituitary gland is trying to get the thyroid to produce hormones. A high TSH indicates hypothyroidism or an under-active thyroid. Conversely, a low TSH means that the pituitary gland is trying to get the thyroid to slow down its production of hormones. This can indicate hyperthyroidism, or an overactive thyroid.
      Many primary care physicians only check TSH. It also can depend on your symptoms and severity of symptoms. If you have symptoms of hyperthyroidism, go see an endocrinologist, who is a specialist who specializes in the glands of the body, which includes the thyroid and pituitary gland. They can do more detailed tests to make sure your pituitary gland and thyroid are functioning properly.
      I have always had abnormal TSH levels when I was hyperthyroid and also when I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism.
      Good luck

  34. QUESTION:
    does IBS and a thyriod disorder have a something in common?
    after i had my daughter last year, my MD found a goiter and found that my thyroid levels were through the roof (but they refuse to do anything about it) and now my doctors think like i have IBS (but i havnt gotten tested cuz im nervous and scared) is there a link between the 2 of them..or is it just by chance i got them both at the same time?

    any ideas or advice??

    • ANSWER:
      Yes they do.....along w/ many other symptoms besides IBS. You have probably had the IBS a while from the thyroid disease that was starting to show itself.

      When you say levels through the roof, does that mean thyroid hormone or thyroid stimulating hormone ... If TSH is high that means thyroid hormone is low, and vice versa.

      Blessings

  35. QUESTION:
    How can I be tested for an overactive thyroid? What are the symptons?

    • ANSWER:
      If the doctor suspects thyroid problems, he will run a blood test to check for thyroid hormones called thyroxine, or T4 and a pituitary gland hormone, called Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, or TSH. The pituitary gland secretes this hormone to basically make the thyroid function. If the thyroid is not secreting enough hormones, then the pituitary gland will secrete more TSH. If the thyroid is overactive, there will be a lower amount of TSH in the blood.
      There are several symptoms to look for, and these include but are not limited to:
      weight loss despite increased appetite
      intolerance to heat
      high blood pressure, rapid pulse, palpitations(feeling like heart is pounding in the chest)
      shaking hands(doctor may have you stick your hands out and try to hold them steady)
      muscle cramps/weakness
      hair falls out easily, is often oily and straight
      nervousness, depression, anxiety, panic attacks in severe cases
      bulging eyes, sometimes angular shape to face
      fatigue, feeling like you can never rest enough, insomnia
      sore, enlarged thyroid gland in the neck, called a goiter

      High thyroid levels for extended periods can be dangerous and is bad for your heart. If you have several of these symptoms, a trip to the doctor's office is in order.

  36. QUESTION:
    Help! What are the causes and symptoms of hypersecretion and hyposecretion of insulin?

    • ANSWER:
      Hyposecretion of Anti-Diuretic Hormone - Diabetes insipidus

      Due to decreased production of anti-diuretic hormone in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Often associated with a head injury.

      Symptoms: Excessive diuresis and thirst (polyuria and polydipsia).

      Hyposecretion of Growth hormone - Pituitary dwarfism

      Due to decreased production of growth hormone from the somatotropic cells of the anterior pituitary. Generally due to a nonmalignant adenoma of the non-somatotropic tissue of the anterior pituitary.

      Symptoms:

      1. Pronounced hypoglycemia.

      2. In Lorain dwarfism:
      a. arrested sexual development
      b. stunted growth
      c. normal intelligence

      3. In Frolich's dwarfism:
      a. arrested sexual development
      b. stunted growth
      c. mental retardation

      Hypersecretion of growth hormone - Giantism and Acromegaly

      Pituitary giantism is due to overproduction of growth hormone during childhood. Usually caused by an adenoma of the somatotropic cells.

      Symptoms: Excessive growth, hyperglycemia, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis and high basal metabolic rate (BMR).

      Acromegaly excessive appositional growth of the skeleton resulting in thickening of the digits and facial features ("lantern jaw" and protruding brow ridges). Increase in height does not occur since at the time of the onset of acromegaly the epiphyseal plates have calcified. Except for growth in height, symptoms are the same as those for giantism.

      Hyposecretion of thymus or absence of gland

      DiGeorge syndrome occurs in children born without a thymus gland. As a result, there is a lack of thymosin production. Thymosin is needed to stimulate the differentiation of T lymphocytes.

      Symptoms:
      1. Little or no immune response.
      2. Inability to resist bacterial, viral or fungal infections.
      3. A lack of cancer cell surveillance.
      4. Inability to reject foreign tissues.

      Hyposecretion of thyroid hormone

      Myxedema occurs in the adult due to low thyroxine production. This can be produced by an adenoma of non-thyrotropic cells in the anterior pituitary, low iodine in the diet or autoimmune destruction of the thyroid (Hashimoto's thyroiditis).

      Symptoms:
      1. Low BMR and lower body temperature.
      2. Increased fat deposition and lethargy
      3. Low blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate
      4. Goiter due to low levels of iodine in blood.

      Cretinism is due to hypothyroidism in infants or children. In addition to the symptoms seen in myxedema, the patient exhibits stunted growth, mental deficiency and immature sexual development.

      Hypersecretion of thyroid hormone

      Overproduction of thyroid hormone can be due to adenoma of the thyrotropic cells of the anterior pituitary, a thyroid tumor or an autoimmune reaction to TSH receptors on thyrotropic cells (Graves' disease).

      Symptoms:

      1. High BMR and high body temperature with profuse sweating.
      2. Increased appetite with weight loss.
      3. Increased heart rate, blood pressure and respiratory rate.
      4. Muscular tremor and nervousness
      5. Cardiac arrhythmias.
      6. Toxic goiter and exophthalmia (Graves' disease).

      Hypersecretion of parathyroid hormone

      An excess of parathyroid hormone production is due to a tumor of the parathyroid gland.

      Symptoms:
      1. High blood calcium.
      2. Decalcification of bone which leads to fractures (osteitis fibrosa cystica).
      3. Cardiac arrhythmias.
      4. Tetany in skeletal muscles.

      Hyposecretion of parathyroid hormone

      The non-function of the parathyroid glands produces below normal levels of calcium in the blood.

      Symptoms:
      1. Spontaneous nerve depolarization causing muscular spasms, twitches and convulsions.
      2. Trousseau sign - Cuffing the arm leads to irreversible flexion of fingers.
      3. Chvostek sign - Tapping the facial nerve branches at the lower margin of the jaw produces contractions of facial muscles.

      Hyposecretion of insulin - Diabetes mellitus

      Due to a lack of insulin from nonfunctioning beta cells of the pancreatic islets. There are two primary forms of this disease:

      1. Type I or juvenile onset diabetes mellitus generally occurs in people younger than 20 years (insulin dependent diabetes). This is the consequence of an autoimmune destruction of islet beta cells.

      2. Type II or late onset diabetes mellitus usually occurs in people who are over the age of 40 and overweight. In many cases, diet and exercise can reverse symptoms.

      Symptoms:

      1. Hyperglycemia
      2. Polyuria, polydipsia and polyphagia.
      3. Ketoacidosis which can lead to diabetic coma and death.

      Hypersecretion of insulin - hyperinsulinism

      A tumor of the islet beta cells will cause an overproduction of insulin. This will produce a pronounced hypoglycemia. There is a very low incidence of this condition.

      Symptoms:

      1. Anxiety and sweating.
      2. Body tremors
      3. Elevated body temperature
      4. Disorientation
      4. The pat

  37. QUESTION:
    What is the normal thyroid level? and the normal TSH level?
    I am hypo-thyroid (under active thyroid) and have been since age 12. (Hashimotos disease)
    I just got my lab results today and my
    TSH is 5.05
    and Thyroid is 1.18

    I am taking synthroid 137mg everyday.
    *am I still not getting enough medication?
    and if not - how far off am I??
    (and is this why I'm having trouble losing weight????)

    I see my doctor tomorrow .. thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      These are "normal" lab values in conventionl units used in the US. Keep in mind that each medical facility may vary slightly.
      Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) 0.35-6.0 mcU/ml
      Total thyroxine by RIA (T4) 4-11 mcg/dl
      Free T4 0.8-2.0 ng/dl
      You will need to find out if the thyroid level is total T4 or free T4 to determine if it is within the normal range. If this is the total T4 you may want to speak to your doctor about adjusting the dose of Synthroid. Remember that labs should be taken 4-6 weeks following a change in dose. As for the weight loss, being under dosed can lead to a lower metabolism making it harder to lose weight as well as cause you to feel tired, forgetful, have dry/coarse skin and nails, etc. Let your doctor know if you have any of the other symptoms associated with hypothyroidism.

  38. QUESTION:
    Macronutrient Breakdown for a Soy-Free Vegetarian Diet?
    Curious as to what the "standard" macronutrient breakdown should be for a vegetarian. Considering that a soy-free diet would involve a lot more legumes, beans and whole grains, the amount of carbs in a vegetarian diet is naturally higher. What should the ratios be to be healthy and lower the risks associated with high carb diets?

    • ANSWER:
      It's very good to hear that the vegetarian community is beginning to take notice to the negative health effects of soy.

      Here are a couple of facts for you:
      Myth: Soy estrogens (isoflavones) are good for you.
      Truth: Soy isoflavones are phyto-endocrine disrupters. At dietary levels, they can prevent ovulation and stimulate the growth of cancer cells. Eating as little as 30 grams (about 4 tablespoons) of soy per day can result in hypothyroidism with symptoms of lethargy, constipation, weight gain and fatigue.

      Myth: Soy foods are safe and beneficial for women to use in their postmenopausal years.
      Truth: Soy foods can stimulate the growth of estrogen-dependent tumors and cause thyroid problems. Low thyroid function is associated with difficulties in menopause.

      Consumption of unfermented soy products is probably not such a good idea. Unfermented soy contains high levels of a number of compounds that can: block the absorption of calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc; stunt growth; and alter hormone levels, disrupting menstruation, lowering testosterone, increasing the risk of breast cancer, and causing thyroid and prostate complications. Unfermented soy includes things like soy milk, soy burgers, soy hot dogs, and tofu.

      Sorry....sounds like your dad is correct!

      Here's the link that provides lots of info about soy:
      http://www.frot.co.nz/dietnet/basics/soy.htm

  39. QUESTION:
    Anyone know anything on hyperactive thyroids?
    I may have a hyperavtive thyroid... not sure yet... I've been to the doctor I have to go back to get the blood work and stuff... If I do have it, what will happen if I don't take the medicine... The reason the doctor suggested that I may have it is because I've lost 12lbs in the past year causing me to weigh 92lbs at 5'5".... I eat a lot and always have but I've been between 90 and 100lbs since I was little (currently 16)... It'll be a couple weeks before I go to get test run and stuff... until then I want to know as much as possible about hyperactive thyroids... what are the main treatments... what happens if it's not treated... what causes it... will it ever go away.... anything that you can tell me would be GREAT... thanks in advance...

    • ANSWER:
      Hyperthyroidism (or "overactive thyroid gland") is the clinical syndrome caused by an excess of circulating free thyroxine (T4) or free triiodothyronine (T3), or both.

      [edit] Signs and symptoms
      Major clinical features in humans are weight loss (often accompanied by a ravenous appetite), Intolerance to heat, fatigue, weakness, hyperactivity, irritability, apathy, depression, polyuria, and sweating. Additionally, patients may present with a variety of symptoms such as palpitations and arrhythmias (notably atrial fibrillation), dyspnea, loss of libido, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. In the elderly, these classical symptoms may not be present and they may present only with fatigue and weight loss leading to apathetic hyperthyroidism

      Neurological manifestations are tremor, chorea, myopathy, and periodic paralysis. Stroke of cardioembolic origin due to coexisting atrial fibrillation may be mentioned as one of the most serious complications of hyperthyroidism.

      As to other autoimmune disorders related with thyrotoxicosis, an association between thyroid disease and myasthenia gravis has been well recognised. The thyroid disease, in this condition, is often an autoimmune one and approximately 5% of patients with myasthenia gravis also have hyperthyroidism. Myasthenia gravis rarely improves after thyroid treatment and relation between two entities is yet unknown. Some very rare neurological manifestations that are reported to be dubiously associated with thyrotoxicosis are pseudotumor cerebri, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and a Guillain-Barré-like syndrome.

      Minor ocular signs, which may be present in any type of hyperthyroidism, are eyelid retraction ("stare") and lid-lag. These "fear-like" eye-signs result from thyroid hormone's exacerbation of the action of norepinephrine. In hyperthyroid stare (Dalrymple sign) the eyelids are retracted upward more than normal (the normal position is at the superior corneoscleral limbus, where the "white" of the eye begins at the upper border of the iris). In lid-lag (von Graefe's sign), when the patient tracks an object downward with their eyes, the eyelid fails to follow the downward moving iris, and the same type of upper globe exposure which is seen with lid retraction occurs, temporarily. These signs disappear with treatment of the hyperthyroidism, or treatment by certain anti-adrenergic drugs.

      Neither of these ocular signs should be confused with exopthalmos (protrusion of the eyeball) which occurs in one thyroid-related disease (Grave's disease), but which is not caused by the hyperthyroid state in that disease, and is unrelated to it. Exopthalmos when present may exacerbate these signs, however.

      [edit] Diagnosis
      A diagnosis is suspected through blood tests, by measuring the level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in the blood. A low TSH indicates increased production of T4 and/or T3. Measuring specific antibodies, such as anti-TSH-receptor antibodies in Graves' disease, may contribute to the diagnosis. In all patients with hyperthyroxinemia, scintigraphy is required in order to distinguish true hyperthyroidism from thyroiditis.

      Treatment
      The major and generally accepted modalities for treatment of hyperthyroidism in humans are:

      [edit] Surgery
      Surgery (to remove the whole thyroid or a part of it) is not extensively used because most common forms of hyperthyroidism are quite effectively treated by the radioactive iodine method. However, some Graves' disease patients who cannot tolerate medicines for one reason or another or patients who refuse radioiodine opt for surgical intervention. Also, some surgeons believe that radioiodine treatment is unsafe in patients with unusually large gland, or those whose eyes have begun to bulge from their sockets, claiming that the massive dose of iodine needed will only exacerbate the patient's symptoms. The procedure is quite safe - some surgeons even perform partial thyroidectomies on an out-patient basis.

      Radioiodine
      In Radioiodine (treatment) therapy, radioactive iodine is given orally (either by pill or liquid) on a one-time basis to destroy the function of a hyperactive gland. The iodine given for ablative treatment is different from the iodine used in a scan. Radioactive iodine is given after a routine iodine scan, and uptake of the iodine is determined to confirm hyperthyroidism. The radioactive iodine is picked up by the active cells in the thyroid and destroys them. Since iodine is only picked up by thyroid cells, the destruction is local, and there are no widespread side effects with this therapy. Radioactive iodine ablation has been safely used for over 50 years, and the only major reasons for not using it are pregnancy and breast-feeding.

      Often, due to the difficulty of picking the correct dose, the treatment results in an opposite condition - hypothyroidism. However, that is usually easily treated by the administration of levothyroxine, which is a pure synthetic form of T4.

  40. QUESTION:
    my daughter has hypothyroid .i want to consult the best doctor because she is facing severe problem?
    can this be cured.please help me

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism cannot be cured but treated. It has many causes. It happens due to a deficiency in production of Thyroxine(T4) and tri-iodothyronine (T3). Thyroid stimulating hormone(TSH) will be high in the blood stream. It is secreted by the pitiutary glands when T4 and T3 levels are low in blood.But the thyroid gland does not respond to this hormone and so doesnt't respond as it should. The symptoms like fatigue,low tolerance to cold and others -you mustbe noticing already.So since you must have also done the Thyroid functioning test there is no need for me to say anything further.Just consult a good endocrinologist.They will know best since they have super specialised in this.Good luck and the best for your daughter.

  41. QUESTION:
    What is Thyroid Disease and how do I know I have one?

    Thanks Randall.

    • ANSWER:
      Answer should not be taken as a substitute for a medical diagnosis. If you think you have a thyroid problem, you should see a doctor immediately.

      Well, there are 2 main types of thyroid disease. These are Hypothyroidism where the thyroid doesn't produce enough thyroxine (thyroid stimulating hormone) or hyperthyroidism where there is too much produced.

      HYPERTHYROIDISM

      In hyperthyroidism, the thyroid gland hypertrophies or over developes where a diffuse goiter (big swelling lump that is obvious in the throat) and an overproduction of thyroid hormones occur. Hyperthyroidism is more common in females.

      Now, a goiter can be just a simple goiter due to a lack of iodine in the diet; however, this should not be the case unless you do not eat salt whatsoever. If you have a goiter, you should see a doctor immediately to have tests ran.

      HYPOTHYROIDISM SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS

      With hypothyroidism or low production of thyroxine in the blood, you will have decreased activity levels, lethargy, sleepiness all the time, reduced mental alertness, dry skin and hair, decreased sweating, cold intolerance (very sensitive to cold weather), bradycardia (low heart rate), constipation, weight gain, edema (swelling), puffy eyelids, bloated face, and poor circulation.

      HYPERTHYROIDISM SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS

      With this you will have signs and symptoms of restlessness, irritability, nervousness, tremors, moist skin, increased sweating, heat intolerance, tachycardia (increased heart rate), palpitations, diarrhea, weight loss, increased appetite, polydipsia (extreme thirst), and loss or thinning of hair. You tend to lose weight despite the increased food consumption and eating habits. In addition, if you contract graves disease, you can acquire exopthalmos or bulging eyes.

      This is just basic advice and knowledge I have about the disease. You should contact the doctor if you think you have a thyroid condition. Some of the tests you might have done are blood tests and thyroid scans to test T3, T4, and TSH levels.

      Hope this information helps. Have a great day!

  42. QUESTION:
    What does a tsh reading of 1.45 mean on a blood test?
    i have hypothryoidism or hyperthyroidism and if it is hyperthyroidism why did i gain weight?

    • ANSWER:
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Here's How:
      Find out your thyroid test results from your doctor's office.
      If you can, get a hard copy printout for your own review and home medical files.
      If "normal" or "reference" ranges are not indicated on the lab results, ask your doctor's office to tell you what these ranges are.
      Note the level of your Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH). At most labs in the U.S., up until late 2002, the normal range is from around 0.5 to 5.5. That range changed to .3 to 3 as of early 2003.
      If the TSH level is below normal, your doctor may determine that you are hyperthyroid (overactive thyroid.)
      If the TSH level is above normal, your doctor may determine that you are hypothyroid (underactive thyroid.)
      If your doctor ran a test called Total T4 or Total Thyroxine, normal range is approximately 4.5 to 12.5. If you had a low reading, and a high TSH, your doctor might consider that indicative of hypothyroidism.
      If your doctor ran a test called Total T4 or Total Thyroxine, normal range is approximately 4.5 to 12.5. If you had a low reading, and a low TSH, your doctor might look into a pituitary problem.
      If your doctor ran a test called Free T4, or Free Thyroxine, normal range is approximately 0.7 to 2.0. If your result was less than 0.7, your doctor might consider that indicative of hypothyroidism.
      If your doctor ran a test called Total T3, normal range is approximately 80 to 220. If your result was less than 80, your doctor might consider that indicative of hypothyroidism.
      If your doctor ran a test called Free T3, normal range is approximately 2.3 to 4.2. If your result was less than 2.3, your doctor might consider that indicative of hypothyroidism.
      If your test results come back "normal" but you have many of the symptoms or risk factors for thyroid disease, make sure you ask for an antibodies test. Some doctors believe in treating thyroid symptoms in the presence of elevated antibodies and normal TSH levels.
      If your test results come back "normal" but you have many of the symptoms or risk factors for thyroid disease, consider going to a reputable holistic M.D. or alternative physician for further interpretation and diagnosis.

      Tips:
      Laboratory reference ranges and normal ranges can differ from lab to lab. Always go by your lab's reference range and your doctor's diagnosis

  43. QUESTION:
    I have major hot flashes, Can anyone give some advice on natural herbal remidies?
    Help! I have tryed so many things and nothing seems to help. I dont want the prescription stuff.
    Thanks in advance
    I want to thank all of you for all of this wonderful information. I will continue to read and follow some of this advice.Many Thanks to all.

    • ANSWER:
      Try the Natural Cure. If you are through Menopause.

      Symptoms: During the menopause, the entire chain of endocrine glands is disturbed, particularly the gonads, thyroid and pituitary. In a really healthy woman, the menopausal change takes place without any unpleasant symptoms. The only sign that the "change" taking place is the cessation of menstrual flow. There are, however, many women who do not enjoy good health due to dietetic errors and a faulty style of living. In these cases, the menopausal change often leads to all kinds of distressing physical, emotional, and nervous symptoms and manifestations. Hot flashes, night sweats, nervous tension, menstrual disturbances, insomnia, diminished interest in sex, irritability, and depression are the typical symptoms of menopause. Other symptoms are chilly feelings, fatigue, palpitation, dizziness, headaches and numbness. Not every women will get these severe reactions. The severity or otherwise of the symptoms depend on a variety of factors such as general health, previous surgery and radiation. Menopause and its problems are usually over when menstruation stops.

      Causes: The annoying symptoms associated with menopause arise from the fact that the ovaries are no longer producing their normal amount of estrogen, the dominant female hormone. Anything which interferes with the normal functioning of the ovaries may also bring about these symptoms. The same strange feelings may occur if the ovaries are removed by surgery because of disease. This can also result from heavy X-ray therapy or the use of radiation. A lack of normal hormone balance may also result in a severe backache. This is caused by thinning of the bones arising from the low level of estrogen in the bloodstream. Unless properly treated, this may eventually lead to a collapse of one or more of the vertebrae.

      Treatment: Although menopause cannot be avoided, it can be postponed for as long as 10 to 15 years and it can be made a smooth affair when it comes, with a proper nutritional programme, special supplements and the right mental attitude. When a woman is affected by the menopausal change to any marked extent, it is a sure sign that her body is in a toxic condition and in need of a thorough cleansing. For this purpose, she should undergo a course of natural health building treatment. Diet is of utmost importance in such a scheme of treatment. In fact the problems at menopause are often much more severe than that at puberty largely because the diet has been deficient for many years prior to its onset, in many nutrients such as protein, calcium, magnesium, vitamins D, E, and pantothenic acid. The diet should be made up from three basic food groups, namely (i) seeds, nuts, and grains (ii) vegetables and (iii) fruits. The emphasis should be on vitamin E-rich raw and sprouted seeds and nuts, unpasteurised high quality milk and homemade cottage cheese and an abundance of raw, organically grown fruits and vegetables. Plenty of freshly made juices of fruits and vegetables in season should also be included in this diet.

      All processed, refined and denatured foods, such as white sugar, white flour and all articles made with them, should be completely eliminated. Take special supplements such as vitamins C, B6 and pantothenic acid, which have a specific property of stimulating the body’s own production of estrogen or enhancing the effect of the existing estrogen. During menopause, the lack of ovarian hormones can result in a severe calcium deficiency. For this reason, a larger than usual intake of calcium may help greatly. Vitamins D and F are also essential for assimilation of calcium. Any woman having difficulty at this time should supplement her daily diet with 1,000 units of natural vitamin D, 5000 milligrams of magnesium and two grams of calcium daily, which can be supplied by one quart of milk. During the menopause, the need for vitamin E soars 10 to 50 times over that previously required. Hot flashes, night sweats, and other symptoms of menopause often disappear when 50 to 100 units of vitamin E are taken daily. The symptoms recur quickly if the vitamin is discontinued.

      Of late, it has become popular to take estrogen to prevent or postpone menopausal symptoms. Although hormone therapy is apparently successful and will, in many cases, help the patient to feel and act younger, it cannot be recommended in all cases because of its carcinogenic effect. If, however, estrogen therapy is undertaken, it should never be administered at the same time as vitamin E therapy. Ingestion of estrogen and vitamin E should be separated by several hours. Beet juice has been found very useful in menopausal disorders. It should be taken in small quantities of 60 to 90 ml at a time thrice a day. It has proved much more permanently helpful than the degenerative effects of drugs or synthetic hormones. Carrot seeds have also been found valuable in menopausal tension. A teaspoonful of the seeds should be boiled in a glassful of cow’s milk for about 10 minutes and taken daily as a medicine in this condition.

      Plenty of outdoor exercise, such as walking, jogging, swimming, horse riding, or cycling, is imperative to postpone menopause. Other helpful measures in this direction are avoiding mental and emotional stress and worries, especially worry about growing old, sufficient sleep, and relaxation and following all general rules of maintaining a high level of health. The healthier a woman is, the fewer menopausal symptoms she will experience.

      The menopause can be made a pleasant affair by building bodily health and a sane mental outlook. From puberty to menopause, a woman has been somewhat of a slave to her female glands. At specified intervals she was inconvenienced by her menstrual periods. She bore children, enduring the pain and discomfort of pregnancy. Menopause relieves her of this bondage to her femininity. She can now experience some of the happiest days of a woman’s life. A whole new life is given to her, if she is wise enough to prepare for it and accept it as such.

      Hope this helps, Good Luck.

  44. QUESTION:
    Is there really a cure for baldness?
    With all the technology today, have they found a cure for baldness that actually works, or is it just wish-wash babbling to get our money?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Juliette

      Here are some ideas to help solve hair loss.

      Cause
      Hair loss can occur due to low thyroid functioning, poor digestion, parasites, nutrient deficiencies such as iron or biotin, hormonal problems, aging, trauma, post-pregnancy, skin disease, diabetes, chemotherapy, and stress. All of these factors must be considered and ruled out to be sure hair loss is not part of a more serious, underlying condition.

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Natural Cures

      Aromatherapy: For temporary or severe hair loss, massage lavender, rosemary, thyme, or sage essential oils directly onto the scalp.

      Ayurveda: The Ayurvedic herbs ashwagandha and amla can help stimulate hair growth in cases that are not due to genetic predisposition.

      Diet: Eat an organic, whole foods diet high in potato (with skins intact), green and red peppers, sprouts, and unpeeled cucumbers. Such foods are high in silica, which gives strength to hair and nails. Foods high in iron, such as some lean meats and raisins, are also important. Sea vegetables such as kelp are also good for the hair and support proper thyroid function. Be sure to check for and eliminate any foods to which you may be allergic or sensitive.

      Herbs: Massage the scalp nightly with an oil made of one part rosemary oil and two parts almond oil.

      Homeopathy: Sepia, Arnica, and Acidum nit. are useful homeopathic remedies.

      Juice Therapy: Drink the combined juice of carrot, beet, spinach, nettle, and alfalfa, adding a bit of onion.

      Lifestyle: Circulation to the scalp is important and can help prevent hair loss. Increase exercise, scalp massage, and try lying on a slant board for 15 minutes a day.

      Nutritional Supplementation: The following supplements are essential for healthy hair growth: flaxseed oil, biotin, niacin, vitamin B complex, folic acid, vitamin B5, PABA (para-aminobenzoic acid), silica, iron, trace minerals, and zinc. Free form amino acids, especially cysteine, can also be helpful, as can kelp tablets, desiccated liver, and thyroid glandulars.

      Although elevated levels of copper can lead to brittle hair and split ends, low copper levels can also result in hair loss, and should therefore also be considered.

      Topical Treatment: Rub castor oil into the scalp for ten minutes, then apply a hot damp towel for 30 minutes, and then cover your head with a plastic shower cap and keep in place overnight. The next morning, wash out your hair. Do this for two nights, then, repeat this using extra virgin olive oil for two nights, then use wheat germ oil for two nights. Rest one night and repeat seven-day cycle.

      Apple cider vinegar used as a hair rinse can also help stimulate hair growth.

      Alternative Professional Care
      If your symptoms persist despite the above measures, seek the help of a qualified health professional. The following professional care therapies have all been shown to be useful for treating of hair loss: Acupuncture, Magnetic Field Therapy, Natural Hormone Replacement Therapy, Naturopathic Medicine, and Traditional Chinese Medicine

      Best of health to you

      Cheers

  45. QUESTION:
    Hi, can i know how tyroid can effect our body? is immune system become stronger?? and effect our body?
    My doctor already tested my blood and found that my Free Thyroxine (FT4 ) is lower 0.50pg/ml (normal are 0.71-1.85,by then my Thyroid stimulating Hormone(hTSH) is higher than normal level, which is 7.24mU/L (normal are 0.47-4.64). How to become like this.
    pls help to answer,appreciate to receive you all reply soon.

    • ANSWER:
      Many doctors interested in environmental illnesses have found that their patients often have borderline levels of T4 and/or T3 thyroid hormones. They also frequently find that environmental illness sufferers have a low body temperature (normal is 98.7F), which can also indicate low thyroid function, even when hormone levels appear to be normal.
      The thyroid is a small endocrine gland located in the front of the neck. It plays an important role in regulating the bodies metabolic rate, and therefore, energy production. The T3 hormone is the active thyroid hormone, it stimulates every cell in the body to use more oxygen and tells tissues to produce proteins.
      Fatigue, exhaustion, feeling run down, sluggish, lethargic
      Depression, restlessness, moods swings, feelings of sadness, feelings of worthlessness
      Loss of interest in normal daily activities
      Poor concentration, poor memory
      Aches and pains
      Frequent infections
      Slow pulse and/or low blood pressure
      Dizziness, vertigo, and/or light-headedness with or without headaches
      From this list of symptoms it is easy to see the correlation with those of environmental illnesses. This coupled with the findings of borderline hormone levels and low body temperature has led many physicians to try patients on thyroid hormone treatments with a good degree of success. Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum's treatment protocol for chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia includes thyroid treatment and his protocol has been subjected to controlled clinical trials in which its effectiveness was verified.
      In environmental illnesses there are a number of factors that are suspected of causing problems with thyroid function. The main theories of what is happening in environmental illnesses, particularly chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, include some kind of dysfunction of the nervous, immune and endocrine systems. Many doctors believe that the pituitary gland is malfunctioning, which in turn would lead to disrupted thyroid function, as the pituitary is the gland that stimulates the production of hormones from the thyroid by releasing Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH). Another possible problem could be with conversion of T4 to T3. Environmental illness sufferers commonly have nutritional deficiencies to some degree or another (termed functional deficiencies if the level is at the low end of the normal range) which could interfere with many processes within the body. The conversion from T4 to the active for, T3, uses an enzyme that is dependent upon zinc and selenium, two minerals that are commonly low in environmental illnesses, especially if there is a big gut dysbiosis element. Finally, again on the subject of gut dysbiosis, we know that yeast such as candida produce acetaldehyde, a very toxic chemical. If the body is chronically exposed to this chemical it can accumulate in body tissues and prevent T3 getting into the cells. This could be one explanation as to why thyroid blood tests come back normal when someone has hypothyroid symptoms and a low body temperature. The body would not know anything was wrong and would maintain blood levels of thyroid hormones as normal but the patient would experience hypothyroid symptoms.

  46. QUESTION:
    I have,gained 70lbs in a year and lately I have sugar in my urine. Is this a sign for diebetes?

    • ANSWER:
      Hormone changes can also cause unintentional weight gain. This may be due to:
      * Cushing syndrome
      In Cushing's syndrome, the level of corticosteroids is excessive, usually from overproduction by the adrenal glands.
      Cushing's syndrome usually results from a tumor that causes the adrenal glands to produce excessive corticosteroids.
      People with Cushing's syndrome usually develop excessive fat throughout the torso and have a large, round face.
      Doctors measure the level of cortisol to detect Cushing's syndrome.
      Surgery or radiation therapy is often needed to remove a tumor.
      * Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid, or low thyroid)
      Hypothyroidism is underactivity of the thyroid gland that leads to inadequate production of thyroid hormones and a slowing of vital body functions.
      Facial expressions become dull, the voice is hoarse, speech is slow, eyelids droop, and the eyes and face become puffy.
      Usually only one blood test is needed to confirm the diagnosis.
      People with hypothyroidism need to take thyroid hormone for the rest of their life.
      * Polycystic ovary syndrome
      Polycystic ovary syndrome involves disruption of the menstrual cycle and a tendency to have high levels of male hormones (androgens).
      Women are typically obese and have irregular or no menstrual periods, and in some, the voice deepens, breast size decreases, and acne and excess body hair develop.
      Doctors often base the diagnosis on symptoms, but blood tests to measure hormone levels and ultrasonography may also be done.
      Exercise, weight loss, and estrogen plus a progestin or a progestin alone may help reduce symptoms (including excess body hair) and normalize hormone levels.
      If women wish to become pregnant, losing weight and taking clomiphene
      , sometimes with metformin
      , may stimulate release of an egg.
      * Menopause
      Consult an Endocrinologist.

  47. QUESTION:
    Can cause breastfeeding any problems in a child who's been breastfed by a mother suffering from hypotyreosis?

    • ANSWER:
      Is this similar to hypothyroidism? If so, this may be helpful:

      Per Medications and Mothers' Milk (Hale 2002, p. 690-691), "Thyroid stimulating hormone (Thyrotriopin, TSH) is known to be secreted into breastmilk. TSH is extremely elevated in hypothyroid mothers and could presumably cause a hyperthyroid condition in the breastfeeding infant." However, Hale goes on to cite a study which found only low levels of TSH in the breastmilk of a mom with high TSH levels, "suggesting that human breastmilk does not contain excessive amounts of TSH in the presence of severe maternal hypothyroidism, and that breastfeeding is permissible in hypothyroid mothers."

      Untreated low thyroid levels in mom may result in a decrease in milk supply and sometimes poor weight gain in baby (due to low milk supply). Per Breastfeeding and Human Lactation (Riordan & Auerbach 1999, p. 543-544), "If replacement therapy of thyroid extract... is adequate, the relief of the symptoms and an increase in the milk supply can be quite dramatic."

  48. QUESTION:
    Why do you think the thyroid gland enlarges in response to a deficiency of iodine in the diet?

    • ANSWER:
      Understanding Thyroid Problems -- Treatment

      WebMD Medical Reference

      The Basics | Symptoms | Detection & Treatment

      How Do I Know If I Have Them?

      A doctor can diagnose hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism by testing the levels of thyroid hormones in your blood. Doctors measure hormones secreted by the thyroid itself, as well as thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), a chemical released by the pituitary gland that triggers hormone production in the thyroid.

      When you are hypothyroid, higher quantities of TSH are circulating in your blood as your body attempts to foster increased production of thyroid hormones. The reverse is true with hyperthyroidism, in which TSH levels are below normal and circulating thyroid-hormone levels are high.

      To determine the cause of hyperthyroidism, doctors often use radioactive iodide uptake tests, which track the amount of iodide absorbed by the thyroid gland. Iodide, obtained from the foods we eat, is a key ingredient in the manufacture of thyroid hormone, so the amount of iodide the thyroid absorbs is a reliable indicator of how much hormone the gland is producing. For this test, you must swallow a small amount of radioactive iodide in liquid or capsule form. After a predetermined wait, the doctor places an instrument over your neck to measure how much of the radioactive iodide has gathered in your thyroid.

      If the results of this test suggest that the gland is collecting excessive amounts of iodide, the doctor may then conduct a radioactive iodide uptake scan. In this test, the doctor uses a special film to create a picture that shows the exact location of the radioactive iodide in your thyroid gland. The scan will reveal, for example, if the iodide is collecting in adenomas, indicating that the nodules are responsible for the excess hormone. If the scan shows that the iodide is spread equally throughout the tissue, the whole thyroid is involved in the excess production.

      Some doctors believe that blood tests may not be sensitive enough to detect milder forms of hypothyroidism. Instead, they advocate monitoring your body's basal (resting) temperature. To track your basal temperature accurately, you must closely follow certain guidelines: Shake the thermometer below 95° F at night and place it where you can reach it without getting out of bed. The following morning, before you get out of bed, take your temperature via your armpit for 10 minutes while staying as still as possible. Keep records of your temperature for at least three days. (Women should do this during the first two weeks of the menstrual cycle, as their basal temperature may rise during the latter half.) Normal basal body temperatures fall between 97.4° F and 97.8° F. If your basal temperature is consistently low, you could be mildly hypothyroid.

      If you have one or more adenomas, your doctor will want to keep careful records of when they were first found and how they develop, since not all adenomas produce excess thyroid hormone. In fact, most of these nodules are not malignant, especially if they remain the same size over long intervals. (Cancerous tissue, by contrast, will undergo noticeable growth.) Nodules that appear suddenly are typically fluid-filled cysts and are often benign. They can be evaluated with a noninvasive ultrasound exam. If blood tests indicate that the nodules are producing excess thyroid hormone, and if you have other symptoms, your doctor will treat you for hyperthyroidism.

      In any case, you should receive periodic checkups if you have a nodule on your thyroid gland, since you may become hyperthyroid in the future. If your blood tests show elevated hormone levels, your doctor may recommend other tests, including radioactive iodide uptake tests and scans that indicate whether the nodules are "hot" or "cold." Hot nodules, or those that are actively trapping iodide and producing too much thyroid hormone, are rarely cancerous. But cold nodules -- those showing low iodide concentrations -- indicate a possible malignancy and need to be investigated further.

      One type of thyroid cancer can be diagnosed through a simple blood test that measures levels of a hormone involved in bone formation. In most cases, however, doctors check for thyroid cancer by performing an aspiration, or biopsy, which involves drawing cells from the suspect nodule with a fine needle to determine if the tissue is malignant.

      What Are the Treatments?

      For thyroid disorders stemming from the over- or underproduction of thyroid hormones, both conventional and alternative treatments offer varied methods to restore hormone levels to their proper balance. Conventional treatments rely mainly on drugs and surgery. Alternative treatments attempt to relieve some of the discomfort associated with thyroid problems, or to improve the function of the thyroid gland through a variety of approaches ranging from diet supplements and herbal remedies to lifestyle changes and special exercises. You should always receive a professional evaluation for any thyroid disorder; most of these conditions require a course of treatment beyond the scope of home care alone.

      Conventional Medicine
      Treating hyperthyroidism requires suppressing the manufacture of thyroid hormone, while hypothyroidism demands hormone replacement. Conventional medicine offers extremely effective techniques for lowering, eliminating, or supplementing hormone production. Before deciding which treatment is best for you, your doctor will make an evaluation based on your particular thyroid condition as well as your age, general health, and medical history.

      Thyroid hormone production can be suppressed or halted completely with a radioactive iodide treatment, antithyroid medication, or surgery. If your doctor decides that radioactive treatment is best, you will be asked to swallow a tablet or liquid containing radioactive iodide in amounts large enough to damage the cells of your thyroid gland and limit or destroy their ability to produce hormones. Occasionally, more than one treatment is needed to restore normal hormone production, and many patients actually develop hypothyroidism as a result of this procedure. This is the most common therapy for hyperthyroidism in the United States.

      If you start using antithyroid medications such as propylthiouracil or methimazole, which are usually administered in tablet form, your hyperthyroid symptoms should begin to disappear in about six to eight weeks, as hormones already in your system run out and the medication starts to impair the thyroid's hormone production. However, you will need to continue taking the medication for about a year. After that time, you will also need to receive periodic medical exams to make sure that the condition has not returned.

      Surgery is often recommended for people under 45 when their hyperthyroidism is due to toxic adenomas, since these nodules tend to be resistant to radioactive iodide. Once the tissue is removed surgically, hormone levels typically return to normal within a few weeks.

      Although subacute thyroiditis can bring on temporary hyperthyroidism, this condition usually does not require medical treatment. Any pain associated with the inflamed thyroid can generally be relieved with acetaminophen or aspirin. If over-the-counter drugs don't help, a doctor may prescribe prednisone or dexamethasone -- powerful anti-inflammatory drugs -- for a short period of time. Since both of these drugs may encourage the development of stomach ulcers and the loss of bone mass, however, ask your doctor if you should also be taking calcium supplements.

      Hypothyroidism calls for a lifelong regimen of thyroid replacement. No surgical techniques or conventional drugs can increase the thyroid's hormone production once it slows down. Although hormones from animal extracts are available, doctors generally prescribe synthetic forms of thyroid hormone, such as levothyroxine. Side effects are rare, but some people experience nervousness or chest pain while taking these drugs; usually, adjusting the levels of medication will alleviate any unpleasant effects. However, if you are also taking tricyclic antidepressants, estrogens, the blood thinning drug warfarin, the heart drug digitalis, or if you have diabetes, make sure that you and your doctor discuss any possible interactions or other complications. If you take calcium supplements, it is also recommended to take it 4 hours apart from levothyroxine, as calcium inhibits its absorption.

      Thyroid cancer is usually treated by surgically removing either the cancerous tissue or the whole thyroid gland, a procedure known as a thyroidectomy. If the cancer has spread beyond the thyroid, any other affected tissue, such as the lymph glands in the neck, will also be removed.

      Alternative Medicine
      Thyroid problems are usually easily corrected with conventional medicine. Consult your endocrinologist about complementing your conventional treatment with alternative therapies, which aim to cleanse the system, restore immune function, and balance hormone production and release.

      Naturopathy and TCM
      A naturopath may treat your thyroid condition with homeopathic mixtures, herbs, preparations based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), and acupuncture.

      TCM considers thyroid disease to result from emotional distress and frustration. These block the life force energy (qi) in the liver and spleen; herbs and acupuncture release the qi. Acupuncture can reduce palpitations, irritability and insomnia.

      Naturopaths are authorized to treat thyroid disease in some states; in others it is illegal. Check with your doctor or local health authority to see if your state allows naturopathic interventions.

      Body Work and Nutrition
      Chiropractors and osteopaths use spinal manipulation to treat thyroid disorders by reducing muscle tension and improving blood circulation.

      A diet rich in protein, calcium, magnesium, and iodine supports thyroid function. You want to be sure you are receiving enough of all the B vitamins, vitamin A, vitamin C and selenium.

      Avoid these products if you suffer from thyroid disease:

      * The herb ephedra, found in herbal formulas, and its extracts ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, found in over-the-counter cold remedies, which can cause nervousness, insomnia, headache and high blood pressure.
      * Alkaloids, including substances such as caffeine, morphine, and quinine, which increase blood pressure and heart rate.

      Medically reviewed by Tracy Shuman, MD, August 2005.

      SOURCES: American Academy of Family Physicians. The American Thyroid Association. EndocrineWeb.com, The Norman Endocrine Surgery Clinic. Community Health Care Medicial Library. Johns Hopkins University. US Food and Drug Administration Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. Mary Shoman, patient Advocate - About.com. T WebMD

  49. QUESTION:
    Which of the following represents a correct cause-and-effect sequence?
    A) Cirrhosis of the liver--> excessive alcohol consumption
    B) low thyroxin levels --> increase in TSH secretion
    C) symptoms of disease --> exposure to pathogens
    D) dilation of blood vessels in skin --> overheating of the body

    • ANSWER:
      The correct answer is B.
      Thyroxine is a hormone made by the thyroid.
      TSH stands for Thyroid stimulating hormone and is
      made the the pituitary gland in the brain.
      When the thyroid hormone, thyroxine, goes lower in
      the blood, the pituitary gland make more TSH to
      stimulate the thyroid to make more.

  50. QUESTION:
    Why Do We Have Body Odor?
    just curious?

    Why and what purpose does it serve?

    Do older people have body odor too like young people?

    • ANSWER:
      Your skin has two types of sweat glands: eccrine glands and apocrine glands. Eccrine glands occur over most of your body and open directly onto the surface of your skin. Apocrine glands develop in areas abundant in hair follicles, such as on your scalp, armpits and groin.

      You have between 2 million and 5 million eccrine sweat glands. When your body temperature rises, your autonomic nervous system stimulates these glands to secrete fluid onto the surface of your skin, where it cools your body as it evaporates. This fluid (perspiration) is composed mainly of water and salt (sodium chloride) and contains trace amounts of other electrolytes — substances that help regulate the balance of fluids in your body — as well as substances such as urea.

      Apocrine glands, on the other hand, secrete a fatty sweat directly into the tubule of the gland. When you're under emotional stress, the wall of the tubule contracts and the sweat is pushed to the surface of your skin where bacteria begin breaking it down. Most often, it's the bacterial breakdown of apocrine sweat that causes an odor.

      A number of factors can affect how much you sweat as well as your sweat's smell. Certain foods, drugs or medical conditions can cause excessive sweating, whereas drugs or conditions may interfere with your ability to perspire normally.

      Excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis)
      Some people sweat more than others for no apparent reason. But some factors may make you sweat heavily. These include:

      Heredity. Some people inherit a tendency to sweat excessively, especially on their palms and the soles of their feet.
      Certain foods and beverages. Drinking hot beverages and those that contain caffeine or alcohol can make you sweat. Eating spicy foods can, too.
      Certain drugs. Drugs that can cause excessive sweating include some antipsychotic medications used to treat mental disorders, morphine and excess doses of the thyroid hormone thyroxine. Analgesics, such as aspirin and acetaminophen (Tylenol), also increase sweating.
      Menopause. Women going through menopause may experience hot flashes — a rise in temperature accompanied by sweating and a feeling of intense heat — due to a drop in estrogen levels. Some menopausal women may also be awakened at night by soaking sweats followed by chills.
      Low levels of male hormones. Men with low levels of the male hormone testosterone or a condition known as hypogonadism — caused by reduced functioning of the testicles — also can have hot flashes.
      Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). This occurs when the level of sugar in your blood drops below a certain level. It's most common in people with diabetes who take insulin or oral medications that enhance the action of insulin. Early signs and symptoms include sweating, shakiness, weakness, hunger, dizziness and nausea. Some people may develop low blood sugar after eating, especially if they've had stomach or intestinal surgery. In rare cases, your body may produce too much of the pancreatic hormone insulin, leading to low blood sugar.
      Fevers. Fever occurs when your temperature rises above its normal range. You may have a fever with many types of bacterial and viral infections. When your body temperature finally begins to return to normal, known as "breaking of the fever," you may sweat profusely, which is your body's way of dissipating the excess heat. Shaking chills after the fever are your body's attempt to raise its core temperature. Repeated episodes of fever followed by sweating and chills may indicate a serious infection or other illness.
      Overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism). Sometimes the thyroid gland produces excess amounts of the hormone thyroxine. This can cause a number of signs and symptoms, including weight loss, a rapid or irregular heartbeat, nervousness and increased sensitivity to heat. It may also cause you to perspire much more than normal.
      Heart attack. This occurs when a loss of blood supply damages or destroys part of your heart muscle. The signs and symptoms of a heart attack include pressure; fullness or squeezing pain in your chest that lasts for a few minutes or pain that extends beyond your chest to your shoulder, arm or back; shortness of breath; and intense sweating. If you experience these symptoms, get immediate medical care. Every minute counts during a heart attack.
      Tuberculosis. In 2002, this chronic bacterial infection of the lungs affected more than 15,000 people in the United States. When left untreated, tuberculosis can be fatal. Among its signs and symptoms are a cough, fever and night sweats.
      Malaria. Malaria affects millions of people worldwide. The disease occurs primarily in tropical and subtropical countries, but just over 1,000 new cases are reported each year in the United States, primarily among people returning from other parts of the world. The signs and symptoms are related to the life cycle of the parasite that causes malaria, and may begin anywhere from eight days to one year after you've been infected. Initially, you may have chills, headache, vomiting and nausea, but as your body temperature falls, you begin to sweat profusely. The cycle may recur every 48 to 72 hours.
      Certain types of cancer. Leukemia and lymphoma can produce unusual sweating patterns.

      Bathe daily. Regular bathing helps keep the number of bacteria on your skin in check.
      Dry your feet thoroughly after you bathe. Microorganisms thrive in the damp spaces between your toes. Use OTC foot powders to help absorb sweat.
      Choose shoes and socks made of natural materials. Shoes made of natural materials, such as leather, can help prevent sweaty feet by allowing your feet to breathe.
      Rotate your shoes. Shoes won't completely dry overnight, so try not to wear the same pair two days in a row if you have trouble with sweaty feet.
      Wear the right socks. Cotton and wool socks help keep your feet dry because they absorb moisture. When you're active, moisture-wicking athletic socks are a good choice.
      Change your socks often. Change socks or hose once or twice a day, drying your feet thoroughly each time. Women may try pantyhose with cotton soles.
      Air your feet. Go barefoot when you can, or at least slip out of your shoes now and then.
      Choose natural-fiber clothing. Wear natural fabrics, such as cotton, wool and silk, which allow your skin to breathe. When you exercise, you might prefer high-tech fabrics that wick moisture away from your skin.
      Apply antiperspirants nightly. At bedtime, apply antiperspirants to sweaty palms or soles of the feet. Try perfume-free antiperspirants.
      Try relaxation techniques. Consider relaxation techniques such as yoga, meditation or biofeedback. These can help you learn to control the stress that triggers perspiration.
      Change your diet. If foods or beverages cause you to sweat more than usual or your perspiration to smell, consider eliminating caffeinated drinks from your diet as well as foods with strong odors, such as garlic and onions.

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