Enlarged Thyroid And Weight Gain

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    If you had an enlarged thyroid gland, and it effected your weight gain, how much weight would you gain in one ?
    If someone had an enlarged thyroid gland, and it happened to effect your weight gain, how much weight would you gain in a day?

    I am just curious

    • ANSWER:
      I don't know about in a day how much one would gain. I do however have enlarged thyroid. and how I have managed it was buying "iodized" "red cross" salt. I cook my food etc with it and so far it hasn't bothered me in all these years. The reason I did this is because I overheard my mother say the doctor said to use iodized salt. My mother had her thyroid removed during the operation and they found cancer in and all around in there. By the way they didn't tell her they removed the thyroid. Prior to the operation she had protruding eyes. swollen under the brow area, and the protruding neck area. Taking a crazy guess I would say you might accumulate 8 lbs in a day. But its not really in a day, it may look or feel that way. Any way thyroid messes with your metabolism. Good luck

  2. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of a thyroid diorder in a child age 9?
    My daughter's tyroid seem enlarged and I was curious if she may have an underactive thyroid. She had gained weight in the last year.
    And what causes thyroid problems

    • ANSWER:
      o poor memory and concentration
      o tiredness & fatigue
      o depression
      o irritability
      o weight gain
      o muscle weakness and cramps
      o intolerance to cold weather
      o deteriorating or slowing growth rate
      o constipation
      o dry, coarse, itchy skin
      o brittle hair
      o a croaky, hoarse voice
      o slow reflexes
      o slow heart rate
      o delayed as well as precocious sexual development
      o high cholesterol levels
      o girls may suffer from increased menstrual flow

      NB: children and adolescents with under activity of the thyroid may have almost no symptoms or signs other than weight gain or slowing growth.

  3. QUESTION:
    What are the potential complications of a pronounced (enlarged) thyroid?
    A friend of mine was recently told by a doctor that she should get an ultrasound for a pronounced (or enlarged) thyroid. What are the potential health complications indicated by a pronounced thyroid?

    • ANSWER:
      well if its a thyroid in her thoart /neck.. then the health risks are ..
      tiredness
      rapid weight gain
      deficultly in losing weight
      using thyroids get treated threw medication prescribe by a doc! =)

  4. QUESTION:
    Why would my dad be gaining weight when he has swollen lymph nodes in 4 different areas?
    My dad has hurthle cell carcinoma(thyroid cancer). He has been gaining weight over the last few months. But he also has been having lymph nodes that have been swollen or enlarged. He has had no fever, night sweats, or weight loss. But he does have some of the symptoms of lymphoma. He also has fluid on the lungs, copd, a trach from the tumor, emphysema, lots of breathing problems... Thank you for your advice or any knowledge you have on these issues.

    • ANSWER:
      There are a couple reasons that your dad might be gaining weight. These two are the most common, but only his doctor can say for sure, so he should see him/her as soon as possible.

      First is fluid retention throughout the body caused by the same mechanism that causes the fluid to build up in the lungs. Are his legs swollen? When you push on the skin (firmly) does it leave a "pit" or depression behind? If so, then he may need to be on a diuretic (helps to remove excess fluid) and to restrict salt in his diet.

      The second reason is that his thyroid may be badly underactive from the destruction caused by the cancer or the treatment he has undergone. A simple blood test will show whether this is the case. Make sure that his doc tests for all three thyroid hormones: T3, T4, and TSH.

      In any case, he should get to the doctor as soon as possible.

  5. QUESTION:
    Can Hyperthyroidism turn into Hypothyroidism due to overdose of medicine?
    I was diagnosed with HYPERThyroidism a month ago. My doctor started treating me with neomercazole 10 mg twice a day. Before starting the treatment, my weight was 50 kg and it was constant. Now my weight is increasing rapidly. In one month, it has increased by 4 kg. It is very depressing.
    Now, I am trying very hard to get it back to 50. I am eating healthy food, I walk 5 km everyday. But it is not reducing.
    My thyroid glands are looking enlarged than earlier. Also, I have some symptoms of Hypothyroidism like dry skin, hair loss, weight gain of course, puffy face.
    So, can it be due to overdose of medicine?
    Sorry for my bad English.

    • ANSWER:
      Forget About Working Out

      If the word "exercise" inspires you to creative avoidance, then avoid it. Maybe the trick to enjoying a workout may be to never call it working out.

      "There's some truth to that," Grotto tells WebMD, and once you start your not-calling-it-exercise plan, Grotto says you'll discover "the way good health feels knocks down the roadblocks that were preventing you from exercising in the first place."

      So burn calories and invigorate muscles by beachcombing, riding bikes, grass skiing, making snow angels, hiking, washing the car, playing Frisbee, chasing the dog around the yard, After all, a rose by any other name

  6. QUESTION:
    What types of thyroid conditions can cause weight gain and hair loss?
    And is there anyway to check it without going to the doctor. I imagine there isn't, but I figure it doesn't hurt to ask.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, Witty. There are two primary kinds of thyroid disease relevant to weight gain and hair loss, hyperthyroidism, (overactive), and hypothyroidism, (underactive). Both conditions are mostly found in women and are a major cause of hair loss.

      Hyperthyroidism is a condition that overly produces thyroid hormone by an enlarged thyroid gland, which diffuses hair loss. The most common cause of hyperthyroidism is called Graves' disease, an autoimmune condition resulting in over producing thyroid hormone by an enlarged gland. Women between their twenties and thirties are mostly infected with hyperthyroidism.

      Hypothyroidism is a condition that doesn't produce enough thyroid hormone. The most common cause of hypothyroidism is called Hashimoto's disease, antibodies that attacks the thyroid causing destruction towards the thyroid hormone production.

      Some symptoms of hyperthyroidism are weight gain or loss, excessive perspiring, fatigue, leg swelling, emotional changes and oily skin.

      Symptoms of hypothyroidism include weight gain, depression, the swelling of eyelids, hands and feet, muscle aches and dry skin.

      Studies have shown that millions of Americans have been affected with a thyroid disease. Hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism are autoimmune thyroid diseases, and if you have one autoimmune disease you can easily increase the risk of attracting another autoimmune disease.

      It's nothing to fool around with, so I would bite the bullet and get checked out by a doctor.

  7. QUESTION:
    Why would a doctor make a teen girl get a thyroid ultrasound?? What thyroid conditions are there?
    Why would a doctor make a teen get a thyroid ultrasound? What thyroid conditions are there?
    The doctor believes that a 17 year old has a lump in her throat.
    What could show up in an ultrasound?
    What conditions result from thyroid problems?

    • ANSWER:
      The lump in the throat could be an enlarged thyroid gland. The ultrasound will see if that's the case. If a thyroid gland is enlarged, then it's probably not working right. It might be an autoimmune condition, where the immune system attacks the thyroid, so the thyroid has to work much harder to produce the correct amount of hormone. If that is the case, they you can take thyroid hormone orally, no problem.

      If one's thyroid gland is not producing enough, then you're hypothyroid, and likely will be tired, sluggish, gain weight, have weak nails, dry skin, limp hair.

      If one's thyroid gland is producing too much, then you're hyperthyroid, and likely will have heart palpitations and be nervous, and perhaps lose weight.

      Thyroid problems are very common, and very easy to fix.

  8. QUESTION:
    What are some major thyroid problem signs?
    I am young and curious if I have a thyroid problem what are some of the symptom's.

    • ANSWER:
      10. Muscle and Joint Pains, Carpal Tunnel/Tendonitis Problems.

      Aches and pains in your muscles and joints, weakness in the arms and a tendency to develop carpal tunnel in the arms/hands and tarsal tunnel in the legs, can all be symptoms of undiagnosed thyroid problems. (For more information)

      9. Neck Discomfort/Enlargement.

      A feeling of swelling in the neck, discomfort with turtlenecks or neckties, a hoarse voice or a visibly enlarged thyroid can all be symptoms of thyroid disease.

      To help find out if your thyroid may be enlarged, try a simple "Thyroid Neck Check" test at home.

      8. Hair/Skin Changes.

      Hair and skin are particularly vulnerable to thyroid conditions, and in particular, hair loss is frequently associated with thyroid problems. With hypothyroidism, hair frequently becomes brittle, coarse and dry, while breaking off and falling out easily. Skin can become coarse, thick, dry,and scaly. In hypothyroidism, there is often an unusual loss of hair in the outer edge of the eyebrow. With hyperthyroidism, severe hair loss can also occur, and skin can become fragile and thin.

      7. Bowel Problems.

      Severe or long-term constipation is frequently associated with hypothyroidism, while diarrhea or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is associated with hyperthyroidism.

      6. Menstrual Irregularities and Fertility Problems.

      Heavier, more frequent and more painful periods are frequently associated with hypothyroidism, and shorter, lighter or infrequent menstruation can be associated with hyperthyroidism. Infertility can also be associated with undiagnosed thyroid conditions. (For More Information)

      . Family History.
      If you have a family history of thyroid problems, you are at a higher risk of having a thyroid condition yourself. You may not always be aware of thyroid problems in your family, though, because among older people, it is often referred to as "gland trouble" or "goiter." So pay attention to any discussions of glandular conditions or goiter or weight gain due to "a glandular problem," as these may be indirect ways of referring to thyroid conditions.

      4. Cholesterol Issues

      High cholesterol, especially when it is not responsive to diet, exercise or cholesterol-lowering medication, can be a sign of undiagnosed hypothyroidism. Unusually low cholesterol levels may be a sign of hyperthyroidism.

      3. Depression and Anxiety.

      Depression or anxiety — including sudden onset of panic disorder — can be symptoms of thyroid disease. Hypothyroidism is most typically associated with depression, while hyperthyroidism is more commonly associated with anxiety or panic attacks. Depression that does not respond to antidepressants may also be a sign of an undiagnosed thyroid disorder. (For More Information)

      2. Weight Changes.

      You may be on a low-fat, low-calorie diet with a rigorous exercise program, but are failing to lose or gain any weight. Or you may have joined a diet program or support group, such as Weight Watchers, and you are the only one who isn't losing any weight. Difficulty losing weight can be a sign of hypothyroidism. You may be losing weight while eating the same amount of food as usual — or even losing while eating more than normal. Unexplained weight changes and issues can be signs of both hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. (For More Information)

      1. Fatigue.

      Feeling exhausted when you wake up, feeling as if 8 or 10 hours of sleep a night is insufficient or being unable to function all day without a nap can all be signs of thyroid problems. (With hyperthyroidism, you may also have nighttime insomnia that leaves you exhausted during the day.) (For More Information)

      If you have some of the above symptoms, your next steps should be to read Thyroid Disease 101, along with a visit to your doctor for a thorough thyroid evaluation.

  9. QUESTION:
    how much peanut butter should i eat at night to gain weight?
    when asking about weight gain, i always hear "eat lots of peanut butter before bed!" and i want to know how much i should eat? and at night, should i eat until i start to feel sick?

    • ANSWER:
      If you wish to put on weight(have you got medical advice on whether you need to put on weight?) don't believe that you need to eat fats. There are good fats and bad fats (eg bad fat - fats in burgers etc as opposed to good fats - avocado, olive oil etc) and all an increase in bad fats will do is put you ate risk of bad cholesterol problems, resulting in heart disease etc. Yes there are two types of cholesterol - bad and good (hld and ldl) To gain weight it is carbohydrates you need. Pasta, bread, rice, potatoes etc. Weight gain is caused through eating more carbs than your body comsumes eg if you eat heaps of bread, pasta, patries etc and never exercise you will put on weight due to the fact that you are not burning up the carbs (the body's fuel source). I would increase your carbohydrate intake - however please still exercise for good health. You need to aim for more carbohydrate than you are burning. First and foremost though I would get yourself to a doctor to ensure you do not have any complications such as an enlarged thyroid etc which could be stopping you from putting on weight, and please still eat fruit and veg to keep your health stable. Also have at least 3 fish meals a week or take fish oil tablets as your body needs Omega 3's so it can function well. Good luck.

  10. QUESTION:
    What happens if I stop taking my thyroid medicine?
    I was born without a thyroid and I have to take pills every day for the rest of my life. What happens if I stop taking them for a month than began taking them again? I take synthroid, 100mcg. I haven't taken them in two weeks and I was just wondering what would happen.

    • ANSWER:
      Good job, Ashley, put your life on the line for a not cute experiment. And without checking if there would be harm to your self by doing this.
      I think I'll give your parents a yell, and tell on you.

      Below is a list of side effects of not taking your synthroid. The condition is called hypothyroidism, and that means your body does not have enough thyroid. In your case, you have no thyroid, so yo have not thyroid hormone in your body.
      Hey Ash, take a pic of yourself and post it when your hair falls out, you gain weight, and your face gets puffy and swollen. And hey, by the way, they don't mean a little swollen, they mean a lot. Bet you are going to look funny without eyebrows.

      HEY ASHLEY'S PARENTS! YOU RAISED A DOLT! SHE'S NOT TAKING HER MEDS! You might still recognize her, she is the one slumped in the corner over there, unable to move, that is hairless and swelled up like a toad.

      Symptoms list from Yahoo Health
      Early symptoms:

      •Being more sensitive to cold
      •Constipation
      •Depression
      •Fatigue or feeling slowed down
      •Heavier menstrual periods
      •Joint or muscle pain
      •Paleness or dry skin
      •Thin, brittle hair or fingernails
      •Weakness
      •Weight gain (unintentional)
      Late symptoms, if left untreated:

      •Decreased taste and smell
      •Hoarseness
      •Puffy face, hands, and feet
      •Slow speech
      •Thickening of the skin
      •Thinning of eyebrows
      •Enlarged thyroid gland (your doctor can check for this during an exam)
      •Changes in cholesterol
      •Slow heart rate
      •Infertility
      swollen thyroid gland

      PS, Ashley, I'm a nurse. Get yourself to wherever you keep the synthroid, and take one RIGHT NOW. There is just no excuse for treating your body so badly.
      Don't throw your health away. You might need it.

  11. QUESTION:
    My husband had blood work done and his TSH level came back as 24.67. How bad is that?
    He has symptoms like weight gain, forgetfullness, dry skin, thinning eyebrows and his neck is enlarged. Could this be thyroid cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      It's quite high (not massively high), consistent with an underactive thyroid - by far and away the most likely explanation. Thyroid cancer does not increase TSH like this. An increase in TSH is the body's way of shouting at the thyroid gland to work harder.

  12. QUESTION:
    What are the medical problems related to hyperactive thyroid? Does it affect organs , growth?
    Son has hyperactive thyroid just eager to find out what to expect. Hes 4 years old. He weighs 30 pounds he eats good ,and is very very active. Give him daily vitamins and always make sure he goes to bed with a fulle belly. But fighting a losing battle. Waiting on doctor to see him. Has flu rite now so cant run test but doctor is pretty sure thats what it is. What medications are available and what are the side effects? Will he gain too much weight afterwards ?

    • ANSWER:
      Common causes of hyperthyroidism are :
      * Grave's disease
      * Toxic multinodular goiter
      * Solitary toxic adenoma

      Also : * De Quervan's subacute thyroiditis.

      There are a few other conditions where hyperthyroidism can sometimes occur.

      Individuals with hyperthyroidism are hyperactive, restless, prefer cooler places, may feel excessively hot and have excessive sweating, palpitations, protruding eyeball, hot moist palms, may even have diarrhoea, weight loss and an increased appetite and can have a goiter (patients usually have several, if not all, of these features).

      But I don't know of hyperthyroidism increasing the person's susceptibility to infection, or delaying recovery from infection, as you seem to be worried in the case of your son.

      For treatment, the physician will perhaps start with methimazole (or carbimazole), and if it causes jaundice or increases vulnerability to infection, propylthiouracil (PTU). (Propranolol may have to be added if symptoms like palpitation, sweating are creating major trouble.)

      So this drug (carbimazole / methimazole / PTU) will be administered for about 8 - 12 weeks with regular assessment of hormone levels. When the hormone levels are back to normal, the drug may be continued at a lower maintenance dose for another 18 months if it is Grave's disease.

      If it is toxic multinodular goiter or solitary toxic adenoma, the physician may, after normalising the hormone levels, opt for radiotherapy. Radiotherapy can be given by external beam radiation, or by ingesting drugs containing radioactive iodine that will selectively exert its action on the thyroid gland.

      Surgery would be needed only if the patient has an enlarged thyroid gland which is compressing on the trachea or oesophagus, or is simply looking odd. Otherwise, drugs and radiation will suffice.

      Side-effects of treatment mainly involve too much suppression of the thyroid so that the patient becomes hypothyroid. In that case, the physician may prescribe hormone supplementation.

      Addressing your worries about your son gaining too much weight afterwards, I don't think that is a possibility (unless he unfortunately becomes hypothyroid due to treatment and then hormone supplementation is not given). So, there is not much for you to worry about his flu, or about gaining weight.

      But I didn't understand why you said "fighting a losing battle". Perhaps you could clarify.

      In any case, wish you be well.

  13. QUESTION:
    How long does it take hypothyroidism to develop?
    I have only jst started to gain weight a few month ago but I have had all other syptoms for about 3 years

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms
      Thyroid

      The signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism vary widely, depending on the severity of the hormone deficiency. But in general, any problems you do have tend to develop slowly, often over a number of years.
      At first, you may barely notice the symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue and sluggishness, or you may simply attribute them to getting older. But as your metabolism continues to slow, you may develop more obvious signs and symptoms. Hypothyroidism symptom may include:
      •Fatigue
      •Sluggishness
      •Increased sensitivity to cold
      •Constipation
      •Pale, dry skin
      •A puffy face
      •Hoarse voice
      •An elevated blood cholesterol level
      •Unexplained weight gain
      •Muscle aches, tenderness and stiffness
      •Pain, stiffness or swelling in your joints
      •Muscle weakness
      •Heavier than normal menstrual periods
      •Brittle fingernails and hair
      •Depression
      When hypothyroidism isn't treated, signs and symptoms can gradually become more severe. Constant stimulation of your thyroid to release more hormones may lead to an enlarged thyroid (goiter). In addition, you may become more forgetful, your thought processes may slow or you may feel depressed.
      Advanced hypothyroidism, known as myxedema, is rare, but when it occurs it can be life-threatening. Signs and symptoms include low blood pressure, decreased breathing, decreased body temperature, unresponsiveness and even coma. In extreme cases, myxedema can be fatal.
      Hypothyroidism in children and teens
      Although hypothyroidism most often affects middle-aged and older women, anyone can develop the condition, including infants and teenagers. Initially, babies born without a thyroid gland or with a gland that doesn't work properly may have few signs and symptoms. When newborns do have problems with hypothyroidism, they may include:
      •Yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice). In most cases, this occurs when a baby's liver can't metabolize a molecule called bilirubin, which normally forms when the body recycles old or damaged red blood cells.
      •Frequent choking.
      •A large, protruding tongue.
      •A puffy appearance to the face.
      As the disease progresses, infants are likely to have trouble feeding and may fail to grow and develop normally. They may also have:
      •Constipation
      •Poor muscle tone
      •Excessive sleepiness
      When hypothyroidism in infants isn't treated, even mild cases can lead to severe physical and mental retardation.
      In general, children and teens who develop hypothyroidism have the same signs and symptoms as adults do, but they may also experience:
      •Poor growth, resulting in short stature
      •Delayed development of permanent teeth
      •Delayed puberty
      •Poor mental development
      Check for Urself Ur symptoms with the above details.

  14. QUESTION:
    How do I get my cat to gain weight?
    He is about 10 years old and weighs around 7.5 pounds. He has always been super skinny!! He was the runt of his litter and near dear death at one point. Once I shaved him and he looked so skinny and like a ferret or something haha all my friends laughed at him and made fun of his weight. I feed him so much though! I give him dry food, plain lowfat yogurt, and a can of fancy feast everyday. How can I get him to gain weight?

    • ANSWER:
      I would take him to the vet for a complete check up to rule out any medical condition for his weight loss. Parasites, diabetes, thyroid and liver disease are what pops up in my mind first. Once your vet has examined your cat and ruled out any medical condition then I would suggest you feed a premium quality food like Nutro Natural Choice. My four cats eat Natural Choice and really like it. It's a higher protein, lower carb food that's all natural with no chicken by-products, ground corn or any artificial colors, flavors or preservatives. Your vet can also advice you of the best diet to feed your cat and also how much you should be feeding. Good luck and hope this helps.

      Feline weight loss should be an alarming symptom as it might signal different diseases or the existence of parasites. You cat may lose weight if he is under stress. In each of these cases, visit your vet and find out the cause of the weight loss.
      1. Parasites

      If your cat has parasites, he will lose weight as a consequence of his lack of appetite and vomiting. The most common parasites that cause weight loss are the tapeworm, giardia, heartworm and the hookworm. These are treatable and may be detected in your cat's feces or blood work. However, you need a precise diagnosis from your vet.
      2. Feline Leukemia Virus Disease Complex (FELV)

      The feline leukemia virus is a retrovirus from the same family of viruses as the FELV virus. The leukemia is a fatal disease. It is transmitted through saliva and other secretions.

      The cat will also display symptoms such as fever, depression, enlarged lymph nodes, discoloration of nose and tongue or breathing difficulty. A cat with leukemia has a weak immune system and will be susceptible to a lot of infections.
      3. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBC)

      The inflammatory bowel disease causes chronic vomiting and diarrhea and will lead to weight loss. The upper or lower intestines are affected by inflammatory cells.

      IBD may be treated with some dietary restriction and identifying the cause of the irritation.
      4. Liver Disease

      The liver helps keep the blood free from toxins and facilitates digestion. Liver disease may be caused by increased toxicity in the cat's body, hepatitis or cancer. Besides weight loss, the cat will vomit and have diarrhea. Your pet will have yellow eyes and mucous membranes, suffer from depression, have seizures and bad breath.
      5. Diabetes

      Diabetes is an endocrine disorder caused by the deficiency of insulin in the body. The insulin is needed to properly metabolize the sugars in the blood. Diabetes causes weight loss. You will also notice apathy, constant urination and thirst, vomiting and bad breath.

      Diabetes is not treatable but can be managed by the administration of insulin shots. Detecting the disease is critical.
      6. Kidney Disease

      Kidney failure may be fatal to a cat. If the kidney has lost more than 70% of its filtering function, the cat has kidney failure. The kidney failure is caused by infections, kidney tumors, cysts and kidney disease. Most of the kidney failures are not reversible. Wet diet will be prescribed and phosphorous binders will keep the condition under control.
      7. Stress Induced Weight Loss

      If a cat is under a lot of stress he will lack appetite. The causes of stress may be recent changes in the cat's life, such as moving or the presence of a new pet or person in the home. The stress may be handled through therapy or by reassuring your cat that he is still important to you, and creating a comfortable home in the new place.

      Excessive weight loss can cause feline anemia. Detecting the cause of weight loss is important for your cat's health, as some of these diseases are fatal.

  15. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know all the signs of a thyroid problem?
    Hypothyroidism runs high in my family. Probably effects 7 out of 10.
    About two years ago I experienced some problems and was tested for thyroid by a metobolic endocrinologist. Tests showed normal thyroid activity but I am still having issues. What are all the signs and should I go for a second test?

    • ANSWER:
      You don't need to have all of these symptoms in order to have a thyroid problem, but here are some of the most common signs that you might have a thyroid condition.

      10. Muscle and Joint Pains, Carpal/Tendonitis Problems.
      Aches and pains in muscles and joints, and a tendency to develop carpal tunnel in the arms/hands, and tarsal tunnel in the legs, can all be symptoms of undiagnosed thyroid problems, most typically hypothyroidism.

      9. Neck Discomfort/Enlargement.
      A feeling of swelling in the neck, discomfort with turtlenecks or neckties, a hoarse voice, or a visibly enlarged thyroid can all be symptoms of thyroid disease. To find out if the thyroid is enlarged, you take a simple test at home. Hold a mirror so that you can see the area of your neck just below the Adam's apple and right above the collarbone. Tip your head back, while keeping this view of your neck and thyroid area in your mirror. Take a drink of water and swallow. As you swallow, look at your neck. Watch carefully for any bulges, enlargement, protrusions, or unusual appearances in this area when you swallow, and if you see anything unusual, see your doctor right away.

      8. Hair / Skin Changes.
      Hair and skin are particularly vulnerable to thyroid conditions. With hypothyroidism, hair frequently becomes coarse and dry, breaking, brittle, and falls out easily. Skin can become coarse, thick, dry, scaly. In hypothyroidism, there is often an unusual loss of hair in the outer edge of the eyebrow. With hyperthyroidism, severe hair loss can also occur, and skin can become fragile and think.

      7. Bowel Problems.
      Severe or long-term constipation is frequently associated with hypothyroidism, while diarrhea or irritable bowel syndrome is associated with hyperthyroidism.

      6. Menstrual Irregularities and Fertility Problems.
      Heavier, more frequent, more painful periods are frequently associated with hypothyroidism, and shorter, lighter, or infrequent menstruation can be associated with hyperthyroidism. Infertility can also be associated with undiagnosed thyroid conditions.

      5. Family History.
      A family history of thyroid problems puts you at higher risk of having a thyroid condition yourself. But you may not always be aware of thyroid problems in your family, as among older people, they are often referred to as "gland trouble" or "goiter." So pay attention to any discussions of glandular conditions or goiter or weight gain due to "glandular trouble" as these may be referring to thyroid conditions.

      4. Fatigue.
      Feeling exhausted when you wake up, feeling as if 8 or 10 hours of sleep a night is insufficient, or being unable to function a full day without a nap can all be signs of both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. (With hyperthyroidism, you may have nighttime insomnia that leaves you exhausted during the day.)

      3. Depression and Anxiety.
      Depression or anxiety -- including sudden onset of panic disorder -- can be symptoms of thyroid disease. Hypothyroidism is most typically associated with depression, while hyperthyroidism is more commonly associated with anxiety or panic attacks. Depression that does not respond to anti-depressants may also be a sign of an undiagnosed thyroid disorder.

      2. Weight Changes.
      You may be gaining weight but eating and working out the same as always, or you're losing weight, and eating the same amount of food as usual -- or even eating more than normal. Weight changes -- up or down -- can be signs of both hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism.

      1. Difficulty Losing Weight.
      You may be on a low-fat, low-calorie diet with rigorous exercise program, but are failing to lose any weight, or even gaining. Or you may have joined a diet program, or support group like Weight Watchers, and you're following it to the letter, and are the only one who isn't losing any weight. Difficulty losing weight can be a sign of hypothyroidism.

  16. QUESTION:
    How to treat and what is Hyperthyroidism?
    .I was wondering what can happen if I don't get this treated? I've had it for a long time. It runs in my family.
    My conditions are that I never gain weight, I eat all the time, my heart beats faster when I'm sitting down. I'm also underweight.
    Are there anyone out there that has this treated or have this? What can I do to get it treated?
    Also what is it?
    Thanks for all you answers.

    • ANSWER:
      Definition

      Hyperthyroidism is a condition caused by an overactive thyroid gland. The gland makes too much T4 and T3 hormones. Hormones are substances that affect and control many important functions in the body.

      Alternative Names
      Thyrotoxicosis; Overactive thyroid

      Causes, incidence, and risk factors

      The thyroid gland is located in the neck. It produces several hormones which control the way that every cell in the body uses energy (metabolism). The thyroid is part of the endocrine system.

      Hyperthyroidism or thyrotoxicosis occurs when the thyroid releases too many of its hormones over a short (acute) or long (chronic) period of time. Many diseases and conditions can cause this problem, including:

      Graves disease
      Non-cancerous growths of the thyroid gland or pituitary gland
      Tumors of the testes or ovaries
      Inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the thyroid due to viral infections or other causes
      Ingestion (taking in through the mouth, such as in eating) of large amounts of thyroid hormone
      Ingestion of excessive iodineGraves disease accounts for 85% of all cases of hyperthyroidism.

      Related topics:

      Painless (silent thyroiditis
      Factitious hyperthyroidism
      Hypothyroidism
      Graves disease

      Symptoms

      Weight loss
      Increased appetite
      Nervousness
      Restlessness
      Heat intolerance
      Increased sweating
      Fatigue
      Frequent bowel movements
      Menstrual irregularities in women
      Goiter (visibly enlarged thyroid) may be present
      Additional symptoms that may be associated with this disease:
      Weakness
      Sleeping difficulty
      Clammy skin
      Skin blushing or flushing
      Bounding pulse
      Nausea and vomiting
      Lack of menstruation
      Itching - overall
      Heartbeat sensations
      Hand tremor
      Hair loss
      Diarrhea
      Breast development in men
      High blood pressure
      Protruding eyes (exophthalmos)

      Signs and tests

      Physical examination may reveal thyroid enlargement or goiter. Vital signs (temperature, pulse, rate of breathing, blood pressure) show increased heart rate. Systolic blood pressure (the first number in a blood pressure reading) may be high.

      Laboratory tests that evaluate thyroid function:

      Serum TSH is usually low
      T3 and free T4 are usually high
      This disease may also alter the results of the following tests:
      Vitamin B-12
      TSI
      Triglycerides
      RT3U
      Radioactive iodine uptake
      Glucose test
      Cholesterol test
      Antithyroglobulin antibody

      Treatment

      Treatment varies depending on the cause of the condition and the severity of symptoms. Hyperthyroidism is usually treated with antithyroid medications, radioactive iodine (which destroys the thyroid and stops the excess production of hormones), or surgery to remove the thyroid.

      If the thyroid must be removed with radiation or surgery, replacement thyroid hormones must be taken for the rest of the person's life.

      Beta-blockers like propranolol are used to treat some of the symptoms including rapid heart rate, sweating, and anxiety until the hyperthyroidism can be controlled.

      Expectations (prognosis)

      Hyperthyroidism caused by Graves disease is usually progressive and has many associated complications, some of which are severe and affect quality of life.

      These include complications caused by treatment such as use of radioactive iodine, surgery, and medications to replace thyroid hormones. However, hyperthyroidism is generally treatable and rarely fatal.

      Complications

      Heart-related complications include rapid heart rate, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation.

      Thyroid crisis or storm is an acute worsening of the symptoms of hyperthyroidism that may occur with infection or stress. Fever, decreased mental alertness, and abdominal pain may occur, and immediate hospitalization is needed.

      Hyperthyroidism increases the risk for osteoporosis.
      There may be complications related to surgery, including visible scarring of the neck, hoarseness due to nerve damage to the voice box, and a low calcium level because of damage to the parathyroid glands.

      Complications may be related to replacement of thyroid hormones. If too little hormone is given, symptoms of under-active thyroid can occur including fatigue, increased cholesterol levels, mild weight gain, depression, and slowing of mental and physical activity. If too much hormone is given, the symptoms of hyperthyroidism will come back.

      Calling your health care provider

      Call your health care provider if you have symptoms which could be caused by excessive thyroid hormone production. If the symptoms are associated with a rapid, irregular heartbeat, dizziness, or change in consciousness, go to the emergency room or call the local emergency number (such as 911).

      Call your health care provider if treatment for hyperthyroidism induces symptoms of under-active thyroid, including mental and physical sluggishness, weight gain, and depression.

      Prevention

      There are no general prevention measures to prevent hyperthyroidism.

  17. QUESTION:
    What is the fastest way to loose weight?
    Fastest way to loose weight? Fastest way to loose my gut? Fastest way to gain muscle?

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Treatment for Shedding Excessive Fat and Weight /Obesity (Without any side effects or complications of any kind) :-

      Tongue thickly white coated; patient feels exhausted in warm water Antim Crud 200X, 6 hourly

      With unusual tallness in children; chilly patient Silicea 30X or 30, 4 hourly

      When the tongue is constantly whitish coated; with liver disorders Kali Mur 30X or 6X, 4 hourly

      Fat, flabby and chilly patients. Profuse sweat on hand; worse at night, by exertion;easily fatigued; feet are cold and damp; craving for eggs; sensitive to cold and damp climate Calcarea Carb 200X or 1M, 4 hourly

      Especially for fatty women approaching menopause; sensitive to cold weather; liver and spleen enlarged Calcarea Ars 200X, 6 hourly

      Obese patient who suffers from constipation; flatulence; goitre or thyroid enlargements Fucus Ves, Q(Mother Tincture). 4 hourly,10 -20 drops

      Intercurrent remedy; specially when obesity is due to thyroid disturbances Thyroidinum 200X or 1M, weekly (3 Doses)

      Obese, chilly, constipated patients, specially in women when there is a history of delayed menstruation; prone to skin ailments; feels cold; easily chilled and easily overheated Graphites 200 or 1M weekly (6 Doses)

      For fatty women; feels completely exhausted; (whether they do anything or not) Lac-def.200 weekly (6)

      To reduce weight (flesh and fat); to make the muscles hard and firm Calotropis 30 or 200, 6 hourly

      To absorb abnormal tissues; new growths and fat Phytolacca Berry Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly,10 drops Now its available in tablets form too very easily available in India and Pakistan manufactured by Dr.Willmar Schwabe Pharmacy, Germany

      Obese patient with weak heart; sensitive to cold; aversion to water; habits of uncleanliness; prone to colds Ammon-Carb.200, 6 hourly.

      No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.

      Take Care and God Bless !

  18. QUESTION:
    Do you have a thyroid disease? What symptoms you suffered the most?
    I agree with all the symptoms mention below because I had experience most of it. HYPOTHYROIDISM symptoms I suffered the most -depression, brittle nails, poor concentration, cold (I'm shaking due to cold winds.),

    Symptoms of hypothyroidism usually appear slowly over months or years. Symptoms and signs may include:

    Coarse and thinning hair.
    Dry skin.
    Brittle nails.
    A yellowish tint to the skin.
    Slow body movements.
    Cold skin.
    Inability to tolerate cold.
    Feeling tired, sluggish, or weak.
    Memory problems, depression, or problems concentrating.
    Constipation.
    Heavy or irregular menstrual periods that may last longer than 5 to 7 days.

    An enlarged thyroid gland (goiter).
    Modest weight gain, often 10 lb (4.5 kg) or less.
    Swelling of the arms, hands, legs, and feet, and facial puffiness, particularly around the eyes.
    Hoarseness.
    Muscle aches and cramps.
    In general, how bad your symptoms are depends on your age, how long you have had hypothyroidism, and the seriousness of the condition. The symptoms may be so mild and happen so slowly that they go unnoticed for years. The older you are, the more likely you are to notice symptoms.

    Mild (subclinical) hypothyroidism often causes no symptoms or vague symptoms that may be attributed to aging, such as memory problems, dry skin, and fatigue.

    source: http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/hypothyroidism-symptoms

    • ANSWER:
      my hypothyroidism symptoms:
      hair falls out more than normal, but grows back so fast, its not thinning
      usually always colder than normal
      dry skin on legs and arms
      tired more than normal, can be lazy too
      hard to lose weight
      some weight gain, but started losing cuz I eat healthy now
      irregular periods
      heart palpitations
      mood swings, not always depressed
      Im 48 yrs old and was diagnosed in '99
      i take 50mcg of levoxyl for the rest of my life
      i have blood test done twice a year

  19. QUESTION:
    Are there any women who suffer from hypothyroidism? How bad is your condition?
    I've had this problem and been under doctors care taking synthroid since 2000. My thyroid gland has went down a great deal over the years. The only problem I'm having is my hair is coming out by the handfuls and I read it was for being on synthroid for to long and my doctor didn't think it was from the medicine. I had a 6 month checkup Friday and I told her how bad it was falling out so she sent me for blood work to check my levels again and she said something about changing my medicine. If she don't change me to a different medicine I'm going to another doctor. I'm trying to find women who's having the same problem. What type of medicine are you taking and how long have you been using it? If anyone can relate let me know about your condition.

    • ANSWER:
      The symptoms of hypothyroidism occur throughout the body. In adults, they usually develop slowly and are often mistaken for part of the aging process. Symptoms in adults may include:

      Coarse and thinning hair.
      Brittle nails.
      Dry skin.
      A yellowish tint to the skin.
      Slow body movements and speech.
      Inability to tolerate cold.
      Feeling tired, sluggish, or weak.
      Memory problems, depression, or difficulty concentrating.
      Constipation.
      Heavy or irregular menstrual periods that may last longer than 5 to 7 days.

      Other, less common symptoms may include an enlarged thyroid gland (goiter), modest weight gain, a hoarse voice, muscle aches and cramps, a puffy face, and swelling of the arms, hands, legs, and feet

  20. QUESTION:
    What causes an enlarged thyroid and how to avoid it?
    What are the symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      The thyroid gland can be enlarged for the following reasons:
      1) Enlargement due to iodine deficiency. Rare in developed nations. The gland gets bigger to try and compensate for decreased thyroid hormone production due to nutritional deficiency of iodine.
      2) Enlarged because it is inflamed. Can happen with both underactive and overactive thyroid, so the symptoms would vary. With overactive thyroid such as in Graves Disease, there would be fast heart rate, weight loss, feeling hot all the time. With underactive thyroid, there would be fatigue, feeling cold, gaining weight.
      3) Enlarged due to benign nodules. Called a multinodular goitre, this is usually without symptoms. Ultrasound can confirm the diagnosis and also ensure that none of the nodules look like they need biopsy.
      4) Enlargement due to a cyst or multiple cysts. Can be drained by the physician, but would be prudent to look with ultrasound and perhaps biopsy.
      5) Enlarged due to cancerous growth. Rather rare, but your physician can decide whether the thyroid needs a biopsy.

  21. QUESTION:
    What is a thyroid disease ?Can it be cured permanently or one is required to take medication life long?
    Is it a disease or a distubed gland condition which needs one time treatement or life long treatment? Can it be corrected for once and for ever with the modern day medicines? If not treated out of ignorance then what are the extreme harmful effects of the disease? Can any medical professional guide me about this disease as to help me approach the doctor to be guided properly to overcome the problem?

    • ANSWER:
      I know a few people with thyroid problems and it does require you to take a drug called "synthroid" for the rest of your life. It really isn't a big deal at all, hopefully you have an over-active thyroid in which case you won't have to worry about the side effect of weight gain as you do with an under active one. Your primary care doctor should be able to feel if your thyroid is enlarged at the base of your neck, he may or may not refer you to a specialist, depends on your doctor, some primary care doctors can treat the condition. It's really nothing life threatening and shouldn't really effect much except possible weight gain or loss, being very tired all the time and other minor problems. Good luck and call your doctor, again, it's not much to worry about :)

  22. QUESTION:
    How do people get an overactive thyroid?
    Are they born with it? Or is it a later trait? How can you get rid of it? What are symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      You are not born with it. My mum had it but had her thyroid taken out because of it.
      Symptoms:
      Difficulty concentrating
      Fatigue
      Frequent bowel movements
      Goiter (visibly enlarged thyroid gland) or thyroid nodules
      Heat intolerance
      Increased appetite
      Increased sweating
      Irregular menstrual periods in women
      Nervousness
      Restlessness
      Weight loss (rarely, weight gain)
      Other symptoms that can occur with this disease:
      Breast development in men
      Clammy skin
      Diarrhea
      Hair loss
      Hand tremor
      High blood pressure
      Itching - overall
      Lack of menstrual periods in women
      Nausea and vomiting
      Pounding, rapid, or irregular pulse
      Protruding eyes (exophthalmos)
      Rapid, forceful, or irregular heartbeat (palpitations)
      Skin blushing or flushing
      Sleeping difficulty
      Weakness
      You can't get rid of it but just get your thyroid taken out.
      My friend has it and her sister but you can't tell on her because she is usually large necked but her sister is really skinny.
      Do you have it? Good luck xxxx

  23. QUESTION:
    What's the best alternative for Synthroid for Hypothryoidism?
    I've been hearing a lot of Thyrolar as a safer alternative for Synthroid. I've been having a lot of problems with hair falling out while using Synthroid and I'm only 20 years old. It's bad enough I have a thyroid issue, I don't need to be bald this early in my life. Has anyone else with Hypoactive Thyroidism found a better solution for treatment? What has worked best for you?

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Medicines works very well in both Hypothyroidism and Hyperthyroidism, below you will find the symptoms and the head remedies used in Homeopathy to treat Thyroid Disorders please read carefully and I would suggest you consult a good Homeopathic physician in your locality.

      Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the body lacks sufficient thyroid hormone. Since the main purpose of thyroid hormone is to "run the body's metabolism", it is understandable that people with this condition will have symptoms associated with a slow metabolism.

      Hypothyroidism - CAUSE
      There are two fairly common causes of hypothyroidism. The first is a result of previous (or currently ongoing) inflammation of the thyroid gland which leaves a large percentage of the cells of the thyroid damaged (or dead) and incapable of producing sufficient hormone. The most common cause of thyroid gland failure is called autoimmune thyroiditis (also called Hashimoto's thyroiditis), a form of thyroid inflammation caused by the patient's own immune system. The second major cause is the broad category of "medical treatments". As noted on a number of our other pages, the treatment of many thyroid conditions warrants surgical removal of a portion or all of the thyroid gland. If the total mass of thyroid producing cells left within the body are not enough to meet the needs of the body, the patient will develop hypothyroidism.

      Hypothyroidism - SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
      Fatigue
      Weakness
      Weight gain or increased difficulty losing weight
      Coarse, dry hair
      Dry, rough pale skin
      Hair loss
      Cold intolerance (can't tolerate the cold like those around you)
      Muscle cramps and frequent muscle aches
      Constipation
      Depression
      Irritability
      Memory loss
      Abnormal menstrual cycles
      Decreased libido

      Hypothyroidism - HOMEOPATHIC TREATMENT & Medicines
      Homeopathy offers good prognosis to cases of hypothyroidism. Medicines like Calcare phos, Calcarea carb, Lapis alb, Iodium, Thyroidinum, Spongia, Lycopus, Calcarea iod etc are often found indicated in cases of hypothyroidism.
      ______________________________________

      Hyperthyroidism is due to an excess amount of free thyroid hormone. There is a generalized increase in metabolic rate, with an increase in oxygen use.

      Hyperthyroidism - SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
      The symptoms of hyperthyroidism include heat intolerance, nervousness, increased irritability, palpitations, weight loss with the same or increased food intake, and increased frequency of defecation. Women may have a decreased frequency of menses. Physical findings may include hyperkinesis, warm moist skin, a prominent stare and lid lag. The neurological exam may show a fine tremor and a fast return phase for the deep tendon reflexes. The cardiac exam reveals signs associated with a high cardiac output, including tachycardia, although atrial fibrillation is also common, a prominent S4, and flow murmurs. The thyroid gland may be diffusely enlarged, nodular, or even normal in size. Signs and symptoms may range from very mild to severe. Laboratory tests almost always show a low TSH and a high T3. The total and free T4 are also usually increased.

      Hyperthyroidism - HOMEOPATHIC TREATMENT & Medicines
      Homeopathy offers good prognosis to cases of hyperthyroidism. Medicines like Calcare phos, Calcarea carb, Lapis alb, Iodium, Thyroidinum, Spongia, Lycopus, Calcarea iod etc are often found indicated in cases of hyperthyroidism.

      Best of Health to you.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  24. QUESTION:
    What is a thyroid disease ?Can it be cured permanently or one is required to take medication life long?
    Is it a disease or a distubed gland condition which needs one time treatement or life long treatment? Can it be corrected for once and for ever with the modern day medicines? If not treated out of ignorance then what are the extreme harmful effects of the disease? Can any medical professional guide me about this disease as to help me approach the doctor to be guided properly to overcome the problem?

    • ANSWER:
      I know a few people with thyroid problems and it does require you to take a drug called "synthroid" for the rest of your life. It really isn't a big deal at all, hopefully you have an over-active thyroid in which case you won't have to worry about the side effect of weight gain as you do with an under active one. Your primary care doctor should be able to feel if your thyroid is enlarged at the base of your neck, he may or may not refer you to a specialist, depends on your doctor, some primary care doctors can treat the condition. It's really nothing life threatening and shouldn't really effect much except possible weight gain or loss, being very tired all the time and other minor problems. Good luck and call your doctor, again, it's not much to worry about :)

  25. QUESTION:
    Enlarged Thyroid and Afraid Of Weight Gain?
    I just got the test results back and i evidentally have an enlarged thyroid.
    I don't know what the doctor is going to do, as i don't have an appointment yet.
    I also have a stomach condition called gastroparesis which can make you lose
    weight. I'm extremely self consious about my body due to years of being made fun
    of and now i've stayed at 5ft. 6in. and 140lbs. I do not want to gain back any weight.
    What should i do?

    • ANSWER:
      Taking your BBT will show whether your thyroid is OK. See references below.

  26. QUESTION:
    How many Cytomel (T3) pills am I supposed to take?
    I've bought Cytomel pills in order to lean down fast for a weight class in Jiu-jitsu tournament. But when I got it, it didn't have any instructions or anything just pills in a sealed locked bag. Does anybody have an idea of many I should take

    • ANSWER:
      IMPORTANT WARNING:
      Thyroid hormone should not be used to treat obesity in patients with normal thyroid function. Liothyronine is ineffective for weight reduction in normal thyroid patients and may cause serious or life-threatening toxicity, especially when taken with amphetamines. Talk to your doctor about the potential risks associated with this medication.

      Liothyronine, a thyroid hormone, is used to treat hypothyroidism, a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone. Without this hormone, the body cannot function properly, resulting in poor growth, slow speech, lack of energy, weight gain, hair loss, dry thick skin, and increased sensitivity to cold. When taken correctly, liothyronine reverses these symptoms. Liothyronine is also used to treat goiter (enlarged thyroid gland) and to test for hyperthyroidism (a condition where the thyroid gland produces too much thyroid hormone).
      Liothyronine comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It usually is taken as a single dose before breakfast every day. To control the symptoms of hypothyroidism you probably will need to take this medicine for the rest of your life. It may take about 2 weeks before you notice any change in your symptoms. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take liothyronine exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.
      Continue to take liothyronine even if you feel well. Do not stop taking liothyronine without talking to your doctor.

  27. QUESTION:
    Have hypothyroidism and havent taken meds in over a year and symptoms are getting worse, should i be worried?
    I am 20 yrs old and was diagnosed with hypothyroidism at 16. I haven't taken meds in over a year gut did take some for a few days bout 2 weeks ago. For the past 2 weeks I've been having neck pains and I felt my neck and my thyroid is slightly enlarge. I also have been sleeping bout ten to twelve he's a night but every day I feel like I barely slept. Is the hypothyrodism anything to worry about or is this prob nothing?

    • ANSWER:
      I became hypothyroid at age 14 as a result of cancer treatments. During the treatment they put me on a steroid and I gained A LOT of weight, which I think heavily contributed to the hypothyroidism. I'm at a normal weight now and I need almost no medication at this time. Before I was put on meds, it was severely interrupting my ability to cope with daily life. I couldn't sleep, but once I fell asleep sometimes needed 15-20 hours of sleep. It also caused me to gain more weight, which I've thankfully lost now. Basically in order for crucial parts of your body to function properly, your thyroid needs to be working. It won't kill you if you don't take the medication, but it will continue to make you more and more miserable. Maybe your health insurance can't cover your thyroid medication. In that case, there are some natural methods that have been proven to boost thyroid function. There should be a holistic health practitioner working at your local health food store who can discuss this with you. However, if you can afford the medication please take it. It is just thyroid hormone, it will not harm your body in any way. I promise. And I usually am against most prescription drugs, but thioridazine and synthroid have no long term adverse side effects reported as far as I know.

  28. QUESTION:
    Is there any connection with a slightly enlarged thyroid and a head cold?
    I noticed this week for the first time that my lower neck was slightly swollen (where my neck meets my collar bone). Soon after I developed a sore throat and symptoms of a head cold. Just wondering if these two things might be connected. I plan on seeing a doctor if the swelling continues in what I assume to be my thyroid gland (uniform swelling, very slight).
    Actually, the thyroid is in front of and on the sides of the trachea. And, the swelling is in my lower front neck, not my lymph nodes or tonsils...

    • ANSWER:
      Yes there could be a connection. If you neck area is enlarged then it is very possible that you have an enlarged thyroid, or goiter. Often, a goiter is associated with thyroiditis which can not only cause your thyroid hormones to fluctuate, but cause a fever as well. The "cold like" symptoms can be an inflammatory response to the inflamed thyroid. If you are having other thyroid symptoms such as difficulty swallowing, tenderness in neck, increased/decreased energy, insomnia, heart palpitations, dry hair and skin, increased arthritic pains, or weight gain or loss...then it is very possible that there is a thyroid issue and you should see your doc. Hope this helps.

  29. QUESTION:
    If I get my thyroid removed how much weight would I gain?
    My doctor says that my thyroid may be too big and I have to get an ultrasound for it today. She said if it's too big they'll most likely remove it and my mom said I'll gain weight if they do. I do NOT want to gain any weight but I was wondering how much weight is typically gained after ones thyroid is removed? Thanks/:

    • ANSWER:
      You need a second opinion because even if the thyroid is enlarged you should not get it removed unless your having issues with it being enlarged or if there is possible cancer.

      At all costs you want to avoid having it removed. Thyroid is a very important organ.

      The first thing your doctor should do is find out WHY your thyroid is enlarged do you have an autoimmune disease like Hashimoto or graves a simple blood test can tell this, do you have nodules an ultrasound can tell that OR do you have an iodine deficincy? Low Iodine can cause thyroid to grow large and even develop nodules IF this is the case taking SMALL amounts of iodine should help BUT if you have an Auto immune disease Iodine is bad for it! THEN your doctor should give thyroid hormones and bring TSH on the low end of normal range (normal range is .3-3.0) in most cases this keeps thyroid from getting any larger and sometimes even shrinks they thyroid. If it comes down to you needing it removed for more reasons than just it being large you will need to be on hormone replacements the rest of your life in order for your body to function. Try at all cases to keep your thyroid!!!!!

  30. QUESTION:
    How long would it take me 2 lose 80 pounds?
    I'm 5' 7" and 240 pounds, but actually in decent shape. I'm in college and have been going 2 the gym 4 days a week for the past month and have been eating pretty healthy. I need 2 lose 80 pounds 2 get at 25 Bmi which is border line normal/over weight.

    • ANSWER:
      About 2 to 3 months to shed 80 pounds.

      Homeopathic Remedies for Obesity - Corpulence and Fatness (Without any side effects or Complications):-

      OBESITY (Corpulence) along with:-

      Tongue thickly white coated; patient feels exhausted in warm water Antim Crud 200, 6 hourly

      With unusual tallness in children; chilly patient Silicea 30X or 30, 4 hourly

      When the tongue is constantly whitish coated; with liver disorders Kali Mur 30 or 6X, 4 hourly

      Fat, flabby and chilly patients. Profuse sweat on hand; worse at night, by exertion; easily fatigued; feet are cold and damp; craving for eggs; sensitive to cold and damp climate Calcarea Carb 200, 4 hourly

      Especially for fatty women approaching menopause; sensitive to cold weather; liver and spleen enlarged Calcarea Ars 200, 6 hourly

      Obese patient who suffers from constipation; flatulence; goiter or thyroid enlargements Fucus Ves Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 10 -20 drops in a sip of warm water

      Intercurrent remedy; specially when obesity is due to thyroid disturbances Thyroidinum 200 or 1M, once weekly (3 Doses)

      Obese, chilly, constipated patients, specially in women when there is a history of delayed menstruation; prone to skin ailments; feels cold; easily chilled and easily overheated Graphites 200 or 1M, once weekly (6 Doses)

      For fatty women; feels completely exhausted; (whether they do anything or not) Lac Def 200 weekly (6 Doses)

      To reduce weight (flesh and fat); to make the muscles hard and firm Calotropis 30 or 200, 6 hourly

      To absorb abnormal tissues; new growths and fat Phytolacca berry Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly,10 drops in a sip of warm water. (Also available in tablet form)

      Obese patient with weak heart; sensitive to cold; aversion to water; habits of uncleanliness; prone to colds Ammon Carb 200, 6 hourly

      FATNESS along with:-

      With excessive appetite; obesity after abdominal operation; craving for eggs; chilly patient Calcarea Carb 200 or 1M, once weekly (6 Doses)

      If Calcarea Carb fails; specific for persons suffering from goiter Fucus Ves Q (Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 20 - 30 drops in a sip of warm water.

      Accompanied with unhealthy skin. Obesity during menopause; stools constipated Graphites 200, 6 hourly

      In shy and emotional weepy individuals; loss of thirst; feels better in open air Pulsatilla 200, 6 hourly.

      When due to malfunctioning of thyroid gland Thyroidinum 200 or 1M, once fortnightly (6 Doses)

      To reduce fats from the body (also available in tablet form) Phytolacca berry Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 10 - 15 drops in a sip of warm water. Starts showing results in about 30 to 45 days but you have to be patient and once you get rid of excessive fat using it you do not gain it back cause you are cured .

      Obesity with flesh decreases, muscles become harder and firmer Calotropis 30 or 200 6 hourly

      Fatness; more around buttocks and thighs Ammonium Mur 200, 6 hourly

      Fatness; due to gastric complaints; constipations; tongue thickly whitish coated as if white washed Antim Crud 200, 6 hourly.

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge. Curing without any side effects or Complications that’s the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine. Homeopathic remedies are available over the counter on most health and herb stores in USA and EU or you can buy them online from a number of authentic sites.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  31. QUESTION:
    how to figure out if i have an enlarged thyroid?
    i am 22 years old and i am 120lbs. and i have been this size since i was 17 i wanted to go to the military so i went to get my exam done and they said that i have an enlarged thyroid, i have not ever gained weight or lost any. could this doctor be lying to me?

    • ANSWER:
      go to an Ear, Nose and Throat specialist.. they deal with Thyroid issues

  32. QUESTION:
    What's the difference between the diseases myxedema and cretinism?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Hannah.

      MYXEDEMA

      Myxedema coma is a loss of brain function as a result of severe, longstanding low level of thyroid hormone in the blood (hypothyroidism). Myxedema coma is considered a life-threatening complication of hypothyroidism and represents the far more serious side of the spectrum of thyroid disease.

      WHO IS AFFECTED BY MYXEDEMA COMA

      Myxedema coma is not common, but tends to be seen more frequently in elderly patients and in women. There is an increased incidence in the winter months, which is likely secondary to the extremes in temperature. Myxedema coma can actually result in death. Fortunately, the condition is rare.

      SYMPTOMS OF HYPOTHYROIDISM

      Before a patient develops myxedema coma, features of hypothyroidism are usually present and may have gone unsuspected for a long period of time.

      These symptoms include:
      • fatigue,
      • lethargy,
      • mental impairment,
      • depression,
      • cold intolerance,
      • hoarseness,
      • dry skin,
      • weight gain,
      • change in menstrual cycles,
      • constipation, and
      • headaches.

      CRETINISM

      Cretinism is a medical condition caused by an untreated congenital thyroid hormone deficiency. This result of hypothyroidism leads to mildly to extremely stunted growth, both mentally and physically.

      Cretinism may be said to be either endemic, genetic or sporadic. A main cause, especially in endemic cases, is iodine deficiency, which may be traced back to the diet. Along with cretinism, an iodine deficiency may lead to goiter, which is an enlarged thyroid gland.

      SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF CRETINISM

      • Abdomen which sticks out
      • Delayed bone maturation
      • Delayed puberty
      • Infertility
      • Neurological impairment
      • Ovulation interference
      • Poor growth (height)
      • Thickened skin

      Take Care. Regards.

  33. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of underactive and over active thyroid?

    • ANSWER:
      Early symptoms of hypothyroidism:--
      * Hard stools or constipation
      * Increased sensitivity to cold
      * Fatigue or feeling slowed down
      * Heavier menstrual periods
      * Joint or muscle pain
      * Paleness or dry skin
      * Sadness or depression
      * Thin, brittle hair or fingernails
      * Weakness
      * Weight gain without trying
      Late symptoms, if left untreated:--
      * Decreased taste and smell
      * Hoarseness
      * Puffy face, hands, and feet
      * Slow speech
      * Thickening of the skin
      * Thinning of eyebrows

      Symptoms of hyperthyroidism:--
      * Difficulty concentrating
      * Fatigue
      * Frequent bowel movements
      * Goiter (visibly enlarged thyroid gland) or thyroid nodules
      * Heat intolerance
      * Increased appetite
      * Increased sweating
      * Irregular menstrual periods in women
      * Nervousness
      * Restlessness
      * Weight loss (rarely, weight gain)
      Other symptoms that can occur with this disease:--
      * Breast development in men
      * Clammy skin
      * Diarrhea
      * Hair loss
      * Hand tremor
      * High blood pressure
      * Itching - overall
      * Lack of menstrual periods in women
      * Nausea and vomiting
      * Pounding, rapid, or irregular pulse
      * Protruding eyes (exophthalmos)
      * Rapid, forceful, or irregular heartbeat (palpitations)
      * Skin blushing or flushing
      * Sleeping difficulty
      * Weakness

  34. QUESTION:
    Does this sound like hypothyroidism to you?
    I have had these symptoms for a while.
    tired
    cold
    numb hands when I sleep
    These are more recent...
    weight gain
    hair loss
    exhaustion

    Anyone? I know I need a dr. but I have no ins to go right now.

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of Thyroid :
      The signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism vary widely, depending on the severity of the hormone deficiency. But in general, any problems you do have tend to develop slowly, often over a number of years.
      At first, you may barely notice the symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue and sluggishness, or you may simply attribute them to getting older. But as your metabolism continues to slow, you may develop more obvious signs and symptoms. Hypothyroidism symptom may include:
      •Fatigue ,Sluggishness, Increased sensitivity to cold, Constipation, Pale, dry skin,
      •A puffy face, Hoarse voice, An elevated blood cholesterol level, Unexplained weight gain, Muscle aches, tenderness and stiffness, Pain, stiffness or swelling in your joints, Muscle weakness, Heavier than normal menstrual periods, Brittle fingernails and hair, Depression, Blow Hot & Cold.
      When hypothyroidism isn't treated, signs and symptoms can gradually become more severe. Constant stimulation of your thyroid to release more hormones may lead to an enlarged thyroid (goiter). In addition, you may become more forgetful, your thought processes may slow or you may feel depressed.
      Advanced hypothyroidism, known as myxedema, is rare, but when it occurs it can be life-threatening. Signs and symptoms include low blood pressure, decreased breathing, decreased body temperature, unresponsiveness and even coma. In extreme cases, myxedema can be fatal.
      Hypothyroidism in children and teens
      Although hypothyroidism most often affects middle-aged and older women, anyone can develop the condition, including infants and teenagers. Initially, babies born without a thyroid gland or with a gland that doesn't work properly may have few signs and symptoms. When newborns do have problems with hypothyroidism, they may include:
      •Yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice). In most cases, this occurs when a baby's liver can't metabolize a molecule called bilirubin, which normally forms when the body recycles old or damaged red blood cells.
      •Frequent choking.
      •A large, protruding tongue.
      •A puffy appearance to the face.
      As the disease progresses, infants are likely to have trouble feeding and may fail to grow and develop normally. They may also have:
      •Constipation
      •Poor muscle tone
      •Excessive sleepiness
      When hypothyroidism in infants isn't treated, even mild cases can lead to severe physical and mental retardation.
      In general, children and teens who develop hypothyroidism have the same signs and symptoms as adults do, but they may also experience:
      •Poor growth, resulting in short stature
      •Delayed development of permanent teeth
      •Delayed puberty
      •Poor mental development.
      U may go in for TSH, T3, T4 tests and based upon results, U may approach Yahoo answers for remedies under Acupressure techniques & natural remedies.

  35. QUESTION:
    Am I going through hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism?
    My doctor told me a couple of months of ago that it seems I may be heading to hyperthryoidism. I haven't take any medications until 5 days ago, I expect I may be going through hyperthryoidism. I am on tapazole and taking 5 miligrams, yet the symptons can recurring. My thyroid feels warm, I've been tired kinda, and can't really concentrate. So am I in hypo or hyper? If so, when will the symptoms stop since I just started taking tapazole.

    • ANSWER:
      Tapazole is used to treat hyperthyroidism.
      Symptoms of Hyperthyroid can include:
      Weight loss
      Fast heart beat
      Feeling too hot
      Sweating heavily
      Feeling nervous or jittery
      Feeling anxious
      Having trouble seeing
      Having trouble sleeping
      Shortness of breath
      Muscle weakness
      Frequent bowel movements
      Swollen legs, ankles, or feet

      It is possible to be hyper and then switch to hypo, so make sure you continue to have your TSH measured frequently by your doctor, especially if you are not feeling well.
      Symptoms of hypothyroidism include:
      (These could be signs that you are not getting enough levothyroxine that your body needs.)

      Swollen hands
      Cold hands
      Brittle nails
      Weight gain or trouble losing weight
      Constipation
      Irregular or heavy menstrual periods
      Infertility
      Hoarse or raspy voice
      Slower speech
      Slow heart beat
      Enlarged thyroid gland (front of neck)
      High cholesterol level
      Hair loss from your head
      Hair loss from your eyebrows
      Puffy face
      Feeling very tired
      Feeling depressed
      Having trouble concentrating
      Slower thinking
      Having trouble remembering things
      Paler skin than usual
      Yellow skin
      Very dry skin
      Feeling cold all over
      Muscle and/or joint pain
      Slower reflexes

  36. QUESTION:
    What does an enlarged Thyroid mean?
    I went to a walk-in clinic on saturday because I was suffering from some veritgo, and the Dr. felt my neck and told me that my thyroid is enlarged. I went for a blood test and I have a appointment tomorrow for an ultrasound.

    Does this mean I have thyroid cancer or something?

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid nodules are very common. A nodule is a swelling or lump, which can be a solid or liquid filled cyst or mass. Most are benign, but a small percentage can be cancerous. So you should always have a nodule evaluated by your physician as soon as you notice it.

      Symptoms of a nodule can be varied. Some people have hyperthyroidism symptoms -- such as palpitations, insomnia, weight loss, anxiety, and tremors -- and others have hypothyroidism symptoms -- weight gain, fatigue, depression. Some will cycle back and forth between hyperthyroid and hypothyroid symptoms. Some people mainly have difficulty swallowing, a feeling of fullness, pain or pressure in the neck, a hoarse voice, or neck tenderness. And finally, many people have nodules wiht no obvious symptoms related to thyroid dysfunction at all.

      If you have a thyroid nodule, don't be very worried that it is cancerous. Only 5% of nodules are cancerous, and most forms of thyroid cancers are highly treatable and curable. im sure you be fine. god bless hope i helped.

  37. QUESTION:
    What types of side effects have you had from Geodon?
    I just started on this medication after trying others but, the side effects I read about really scare me. I would like to hear the pros and cons from others who have taken it. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Most important fact about this drug:
      In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon.

      Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon.

      More common side effects may include:
      Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, indigestion, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, weakness

      Other side effects may include:
      Abdominal pain, abnormal body movements, abnormal ejaculation, abnormal secretion of milk, abnormal walk, abnormally low cholesterol, agitation, amnesia, anemia, bleeding gums, bleeding in the eye, blood clots, blood disorders, blood in urine, body spasms, breast development in males, bruising or purple spots, cataracts, chest pain, chills, clogged bowels, confusion, conjunctivitis (pinkeye), coordination problems, decreased blood flow to the heart, delirium, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, difficulty with orgasm, double vision, dry eyes, enlarged heart, eyelid inflammation, female sexual problems, fever, flank pain, flu-like symptoms, fungal infections, gout, hair loss, heavy menstruation, heavy uterine or vaginal bleeding, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, hives, hostility, impotence, increased reflexes, increased sensitivity to touch or sound, inflammation of the cornea, inflammation of the heart, involuntary or jerky movements, irregular heartbeat, liver problems, lockjaw, loss of appetite, loss of menstruation, low blood sugar, low blood pressure, low body temperature, lymph disorders, male sexual problems, muscle disorders, muscle pain, muscle weakness, nighttime urination, nosebleed, pneumonia, prickling or tingling sensation, rapid heartbeat, rectal bleeding, rigid muscle movement, ringing in ears, rolling of the eyeballs, sensitivity to sunlight, skin problems, slow heartbeat, slowed movement, speech problems, stroke, sudden drop in blood pressure upon standing up, swelling in the arms and legs, swelling in the face, swollen lymph nodes, swollen tongue, tarry stools, tendon inflammation, thirst, throat spasms, thyroid disorders, tremor, twitching, uncontrolled eye movement, urination decrease or increase, vaginal bleeding, vein inflammation, vertigo, vision disorders, vomiting, vomiting or spitting blood, yellowed skin and eyes, weight gain, white spots in the mouth.

      Special warnings about this medication:
      Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon.

      Particularly during the first few days of therapy, Geodon can cause low blood pressure, with accompanying dizziness, fainting, and rapid heartbeat. Tell your doctor if you experience any of these side effects. To minimize such problems, your doctor will increase your dose gradually. If you are prone to low blood pressure, take blood pressure medicine, become dehydrated, or have heart disease or poor circulation in the brain, use Geodon with caution.

      Geodon may cause drowsiness and can impair your judgment, thinking, and motor skills. Use caution while driving and don't operate potentially dangerous machinery until you know how this drug affects you.

      Geodon poses a very slight risk of seizures, especially if you are over age 65, have a history of seizures, or have Alzheimer's disease.

      Drugs such as Geodon sometimes cause a condition called Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome. Symptoms include high fever, muscle rigidity, irregular pulse or blood pressure, rapid heartbeat, excessive perspiration, and changes in heart rhythm. If these symptoms appear, tell your doctor immediately. You'll need to stop taking Geodon while the condition is under treatment.

      There also is the risk of developing tardive dyskinesia, a condition marked by slow, rhythmical, involuntary movements. This problem is more likely to occur in mature adults, especially older women. When it does, use of Geodon is usually stopped.

      Geodon can suppress the cough reflex; you may have trouble clearing your airway. Some people taking Geodon also develop a rash. Tell your doctor when this happens. If the rash doesn't clear up with treatment, you may have to discontinue the drug.

      Other antipsychotic medications have been known to interfere with the body's temperature-regulating mechanism, causing the body to overheat. Although this problem has not occurred with Geodon, caution is still advisable. Avoid exposure to extreme heat, strenuous exercise, and dehydration. There also is a remote chance that this medication may cause abnormal, prolonged and painful erections.

      Remember that you must never combine Geodon with any drug that prolongs the part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval (see "Most important fact about this drug"). Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you have any doubts about a drug you're taking.

      If Geodon is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Geodon with the following:
      Carbamazepine (Tegretol)
      Certain blood pressure medications
      Drugs that boost the effects of dopamine such as Mirapex, Parlodel, Permax, and Requip
      Drugs that affect the brain and nervous system, such as sedatives, tranquilizers, and antidepressants
      Ketoconazole (Nizoral)
      Levodopa (Larodopa, Sinemet)

  38. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of being undermedicated for hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms and signs may include:

      Coarse and thinning hair.
      Dry skin.
      Brittle nails.
      A yellowish tint to the skin.
      Slow body movements.
      Cold skin.
      Inability to tolerate cold.
      Feeling tired, sluggish, or weak.
      Memory problems, depression, or difficulty concentrating.
      Constipation.
      Heavy or irregular menstrual periods that may last longer than 5 to 7 days.
      Other, less common symptoms may include:

      An enlarged thyroid gland (goiter).
      Modest weight gain, often 10 lb (4.5 kg) or less.
      Swelling of the arms, hands, legs, and feet, and facial puffiness, particularly around the eyes.
      Hoarseness.
      Muscle aches and cramps.

  39. QUESTION:
    Question about Thyroid levels and medicine for it?
    My T4 levels on my Thyroid test showed that they were really low, the doctor is putting me on medicine that I will be starting tonight, how long does it take before I start feeling better?

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism is thyroid hormone deficiency. It is diagnosed by clinical features such as a typical facies, hoarse slow speech, and dry skin and by low levels of thyroid hormones. Management includes treatment of the cause and administration of thyroxine.
      Normal Results of T4 test:-
      A typical normal range is 4.5 to 11.2 micrograms per deciliter (mcg/dL).
      Lower-than-normal levels of T4 may indicate:
      * Hypothyroidism (including Hashimoto's disease and several other disorders involving an underactive thyroid)
      * Illness
      * Malnutrition or fasting
      * Use of certain medications
      Levothyroxine, a thyroid hormone, is used to treat hypothyroidism, a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone. Without this hormone, the body cannot function properly, resulting in poor growth, slow speech, lack of energy, weight gain, hair loss, dry thick skin, and increased sensitivity to cold. When taken correctly, levothyroxine reverses these symptoms. Levothyroxine is also used to treat congenital hypothyroidism (cretinism) and goiter (enlarged thyroid gland).
      Levothyroxine controls hypothyroidism, but does not cure it. It may take several weeks before you notice a change in your symptoms. Continue to take levothyroxine even if you feel well. Do not stop taking levothyroxine without talking to your doctor.

  40. QUESTION:
    Liver count doubled in 2 years,body pains,nauseaous,pain in joints,stomach pain,can't sleep. What can be wrong?
    I'm 36 years old woman. My liver count doubled in the last 2 years. They've done all kinds of blood tests. I gained about 40 kg in less than 2 years. I have headaches, stomach pains, feel nauseous have pains all over my body and don't sleep very well. What can I do?

    • ANSWER:
      I would suggest that you be referred to a gastroenterologist or hepatologist.
      If this weight gain is fluid building up inside your abdominal area, they could remove this fluid by a procedure known as paracentesis. In liver disease, the liver isn't able to make a protein efficiently, known as Albumin...which would normally hold the fluid inside a person vessels, but it now leaks out and collects there. There is also a condition, known as Encephalopathy, where the body isn't able to convert a protein by product, known as ammonia, into urea for the body to dispose of...it stays in the blood and goes pass the blood brain barrier and into the brain. It can cause a patient to become easily confused, disoriented, and also have sleep pattern changes. Patients who have liver disease, depending on the cause, can feel extremely tired and have flu like symptoms. If they are placed on steriods to help with inflammation in the body, they can very easily develop osteopenia.

      You don't mention any other testing besides blood work. If you have a ultrasound or Ct scan, it would show if your liver is enlarged in size which is caused by the liver cells becoming damaged and the immune system of the body responding to this.

      There are many causes of liver cell damage...see if any of these may apply to you: alcohol consumption, medication toxification, chemical exposure, viral infections like Hepatitis A-B-C, biliary obstruction/malformation/infection, hereditary disease, metabolic disorders, parasite infections, cardiac/vascular problems, fatty liver disease, mushroom poisoning, tumors/growths/cysts/cancer and other things.

      There are different blood tests, the doctors do, to see if there might be a liver problem. The liver enzymes would show if the cells maybe damaged, the liver function tests would show if the cells are able to do all the functions, the liver as a whole does, to keep the body well. The liver viral tests would show if there is a virus that is using your liver cells to replicate itself and others, also. However, in some patients, a liver problem doesn't show up on the blood tests, even though they are far advanced in the disease (they don't know why this takes place, but it does).

      I truly believe I would get a second opinion in your case. Sometimes what one doctor may miss, another would see right away. However, it is best to be seen by one of the professionals, that I mentioned above, as they are more advanced in the knowledge than a primary care physician may be.

      This is just a suggestion...without your medical background and seeing tests...we cannot possibly know what may be happening. I'm going on, you saying that your liver counts have doubled. I hope this is of some help to you. I would also suggest that your thyroid function be checked, also.

      The very best test to check the liver, is a liver biopsy...cause they are looking directly at the liver tissue, not just films of it.

      Best wishes to you...I hope they find out what is happening and can treat you soon.

  41. QUESTION:
    How to stop being so tired on Metformin?
    I've been taking 1500mg of metformin 2x a day for 4 months and for quite a while now I feel completely EXHAUSTED. I can barely focus anymore at work and I go to bed around 9:30pm, wake up around 6am, and still have to nap for about four hours when I get home. I also feel awful and either nauseated or have a headache all the time, its gotten so bad I don't really enjoy life and I consider suicide. I'm pretty sure its because of the medication. What can I do to help? I don't want to get off because my PCOS was getting very out of control

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, you should talk to your doctor about how you're feeling. Also, taking Metformin has been known to contribute to B12 deficiencies in individuals. You are taking a rather large dosage of Metformin, and I wonder if the two might be connected?

      If your vitamin B12 deficiency is mild, you may not have symptoms or you may not notice them. Some people may think they are just the result of growing older. As the anemia gets worse, you may:

      Feel weak, tired, and lightheaded.
      Have pale skin.
      Have a sore, red tongue or bleeding gums.
      Feel sick to your stomach and lose weight.
      Have diarrhea or constipation.

      Also, women with PCOS are often at higher risk to develop thyroid problems. Have you been tested for this?

      Hypothyroidism - thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone

      Hard stools or constipation
      Increased sensitivity to cold
      Fatigue or feeling slowed down
      Heavier menstrual periods
      Joint or muscle pain
      Paleness or dry skin
      Sadness or depression
      Thin, brittle hair or fingernails
      Weakness
      Weight gain without trying

      Hyperthyroidism - thyroid gland makes too much thyroid hormone

      Difficulty concentrating
      Fatigue
      Frequent bowel movements
      Goiter (visibly enlarged thyroid gland) or thyroid nodules
      Heat intolerance
      Increased appetite
      Increased sweating
      Irregular menstrual periods in women
      Nervousness
      Restlessness
      Weight loss (rarely, weight gain)

  42. QUESTION:
    What does it mean for a cat to hav a high thiroid level?
    My mom took our cat 2 the vet the other day and they said she has a high thiroid level. i hav no idea wat this means and i really wanna no!! is my cat gonna die?? or is it just i minor thing?? PLZ HELP

    • ANSWER:
      It means that her thyroid gland which is located in here throat is enlarged and overactive. Meaning it is manufacturing too much thyroid hormone,

      The thyroid hormone is the hormone that runs your metabolism it tells the body how fast food is used in your digestion it tells your heart how fast to beat, it tells the body how fast to breath and how high your temperature is. It really has an effect on almost all bodily functions. Too much thyroid will speed all the bodily functions.

      The good news is you can get medication that will lower the thyroid levels and bring her back to normal range.

      If she has lost weight she will gain it back, her heart she begin to beat slower and all her other functions will return to a more normal range.

  43. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of parkinsons, graves , lupus and addison disease?
    Can these illnesses start suddenly or gradually over many years while the person does not feel any symptoms

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      These disease can take years to be recognized as the symptoms can develop slowly in Lupus, Addison's and Parkinson's disease. Grave's disease can be preceded by a traumatic event. As you can see, there are many common symptoms so differential diagnoses become problematic.

      * Autoimmune diseases *
      Lupus
      Joint pain or swelling
      Muscle Pain
      Fever with no knnown cause
      Red Rashes especially the "butterfly rask: in bose and cheeks
      Sun sensitivity - skin leisions with sun exposure
      Mouth sores
      Hair loss
      Renaud's phenomenon
      Sjortness of breath
      Chest pain
      Dry eyes
      Easy bruising
      Weight loss or weight gain
      Anxiety/depression
      Memory loss

      Graves' Disease
      Fatigue
      Depression Anxiousness, Mood Fluctuations
      Restlessness/anxiousness
      Unusually fast pulse
      Irregular heartbeat
      High blood pressure
      Sudden weight loss
      Irregular menses
      Decreased fertility
      Recurrent miscarriage
      Diarrhea
      Nausea and vomiting
      Heart palpitations
      Insomnia
      Trembling hands - Tremor
      Heat intolerance
      Light Sensitivity
      Muscle weakness
      Enlarged thyroid gland
      Bulging, reddened eyes - blurred vision or double vision
      Elevated fever/higher body temp

      Addison's disease
      (adrenocortical hypofunction, insufficiency) note (Grave's disease is a risk factor)
      Changes in blood pressure (low) and/or heart rate
      Diarrhea
      Skin darkening or patchy skin color or Paleness
      Muscle weakness - Fatigue
      Loss of appetite'Mouth leisions (inside of cheek)
      Nausea and vomiting
      Salt craving
      Slow movement
      Weight loss
      Irregular or absent menses
      Hypoglycemia

      * Neurodegenerative disease *
      Parkinson's disease
      Slow movement (bradykinesia/akinesia)
      Tremors
      Sleep disorders (including insomnia)
      Tremors (begin as resting tremor) (sensation of internal tremor)
      Postural instability - stooped posture, shuffling gait, balance issues
      Freezing gait
      Rigidity/Stiffness- frozen shoulder
      Vision problems - blurred vision
      Depression./Apathy
      Weight loss
      Constipation
      'Skin changes - oily/dry
      Loss of sense of smell
      Loss of cognitive skills
      Swallowing problems
      Speech/voice problems (soft voice)
      Micrographia
      Leg drag, loss of arm swing
      Pain
      ED
      Urinary issues
      Loss of automatic movements - facial mask
      Loss of cognitive skills
      Dementia

  44. QUESTION:
    How do you know if you have water retention?
    and how do you get rid of it...or what do you do about it.

    When you poke me, or squeeze my skin or anything, i go from lite brown to yellow, and someone said i had water retention... is there any other way of knowing? What exactly is water retention?

    • ANSWER:
      , Water retention is also known by its more medical term, edema. This is a condition that results when water leaks into the body tissues from the blood. In normal circumstances, the fluid is drained from the body tissues through the lymphatic system – a network of tubes throughout the body that removes waste and extraneous material, and empties it back into the bloodstream.

      However, when fluid is not removed by the lymph system properly, it is retained in the body tissues where it causes swelling (edema). Water retention is most common in the feet and legs, but it can occur in the hands, arms, abdominal cavity (ascites) and around the lungs (known as pulmonary edema).

      Types of Water RetentionThere are two main categories of water retention, generalized edema and localized edema. Generalized edema refers to swelling that occurs throughout the body while localized edema refers to the swelling in specific parts of the body.

      Close

      Diagnosing Water Retention
      The diagnosis of water retention is determined by a physical examination, the symptoms presented as well as medical history. Various tests such as blood tests, urine tests, liver and kidney function tests, chest x-ray or an electrocardiogram (ECG) may also be performed to determine the cause.

      If water retention is a symptom of a serious underlying disorder, the disorder must be treated first.

      Symptoms of Water RetentionThe signs and symptoms of water retention include swelling of the skin that causes it to become shiny and stretched. Hands, ankles and feet are most commonly affected and the joints may feel stiff and ache. A bloated or enlarged abdomen, breathing difficulties and decreased flexibility of the joints (ankles, wrists and fingers) may also occur.

      In addition, there may also be sudden or rapid weight gain and skin indentations when the skin is pressed. Symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, redness or heat in a swollen edematous area should receive immediate medical care.

      Close

      What Causes Water Retention?
      Causes of body water retention depend on a wide range of factors including a high salt intake, as a reaction to hot weather, gravity, nutritional deficiencies, burns as well as sunburn and as a side effect of certain drugs. Pregnancy, oral contraceptives such as the pill, the menstrual cycle and menopause are also known causes of body water retention.

      This condition may also be symptomatic of other serious diseases such as heart failure, liver disease, arthritis, allergic reactions, thyroid disease such as hypothyroidism, chronic lung diseases, malignant lymphoedema or kidney disease.

      Help for Water Retention
      Treatment involves rectifying the underlying causes of body water retention . A low dose of diuretic (water pill) may be prescribed to reduce swelling. In more severe cases of water retention, where the blood vessels are blocked or damaged, surgery may be required.

      Natural Remedies for Water RetentionNatural and holistic treatments provide gentle water retention remedies.Use herbs such as Uva ursi, Horse chestnut and Buchu for their excellent diuretic properties. Taraxacum officinale (Dandelion) and Olea europea help to balance blood pressure, assist liver and gall bladder functioning and improve circulation.

      Water retention remedies that use herbal and homeopathic remedies are safe and effective and not as harsh as prescription diuretics.

      Close

      More Information on Water Retention
      Tips for Preventing and Treating Water RetentionWater retention remedies such as eating a well balanced diet and reducing your intake of salt will make a marked difference.
      Drink plenty of water so that the body is well hydrated.
      Exercise regularly, especially by walking, to help pump fluids back into the circulatory system.
      Limit your intake of dehydrating drinks such as coffee, tea and alcohol.
      Increase your intake of vitamin B supplements which are known to be beneficial for water retention.
      Wear support stockings or elastic sleeves to help push fluids back into your circulatory system and help circulation.
      Remember to elevate the affected area when sitting or lying down.
      If you are overweight or suffer with obesity, try to take the appropriate steps to lose weight and slim down to a healthier weight in a safe and natural manner.

  45. QUESTION:
    Do I have a problem with my weight?
    I am like 5'2 and 95 pounds. I eat alot (usually unhealthy food) and I don't really exercise that much. But, I can't gain weight. Is there something wrong with me that I can't gain weight? Do you have any suggestions for how I could gain weight?

    • ANSWER:
      I had the same problem, doctor tested me for thyroid disease.

      Have your doctor to test your thyroid.
      Thyroid disease is pretty high amongst women.
      If you are prone to losing weight despite all of the eating, it could mean that you are HYPERTHYROID as opposed to the opposite condition of (hypothyroid) gaining weight despite efforts of cutting calories.

      common signs:

      * Weight loss
      * Rapid heartbeat, irregular heartbeat or pounding of the heart
      * Nervousness, anxiety or irritability
      * Tremors (fine trembling of the hands and fingers)
      * Changes in menstrual patterns (usually lighter flow, less frequent periods)
      * Increased sensitivity to heat, increased perspiration
      * Changes in bowel patterns
      * An enlarged thyroid gland (goiter) – swelling at the base of the neck
      * Fatigue, muscle weakness
      * Difficulty sleeping

  46. QUESTION:
    Should I be worried about elevated liver enzyams?
    I went and got lab work from my doctor today and she said my liver enzyams were slighty elevated and while it's not real high I should keep a watch on it. I am morbidly obese but I do not drink, smoke, or do drugs. The blood work was just regualr labs so why are my enzyams elevated now...they were fine during my two pregnancies. I do take synthroid and prozax daily and I am also low in vitamin D. I am really worried. Is it normal or do they just sometime elevate?

    • ANSWER:
      Even though the tests done: ALT, AST, GGT, ALP are elevated
      and are known as the liver enzymes....only the ALT is most
      specific to the liver itself because it is made mostly by the liver
      cells...the others are found in other areas of the body.

      No one blood testing is 100% accurate. Many things can
      affect the results of these tests:
      An intramuscular injection, muscle injury, consuming alcohol,
      exercising before the test was done.

      If you are taking synthyroid that means thyroid problems.
      The thyroid hormone is what controls our metabolism and
      the liver is the organ that does the most metabolizing.

      In pregnancy, it is normal for a rise in the ALP enzyme.
      So, it really depends on what enzymes are raised and
      by how much.

      Other things that can cause an elevations of these
      enzymes outside of a liver problem is gallbladder,
      pancreas, heart, bones, kidney, and other problems.

      So, how does the doctor decide if this is a true liver problem...
      by doing other blood testing and film testing. He will do
      the liver function tests and the liver viral blood testing.
      He may look at the liver/biliary area to see if the liver
      has enlarged in size, has fat developing inside the liver,
      if the gallbladder is full of stones or if a stone is found
      in the bile ducts and how well the bile is flowing through
      it, and more.

      I will tell you that Fatty liver disease can occur:
      is someone consumes alcohol, certain kinds of
      medication (like steriods), has high cholesterol/triglyceride
      levels, diabetes, insulin resistance, weight gain,
      fast weight loss, and others. It can develop in some
      patients in the third trimester of pregnancy.

      There is about 5% fat inside the liver. However,
      as more fat develops in the liver, it can lead to where
      the liver cells can become damaged. When this
      happens the immune system of the body will respond
      to this and cause inflammation to develop inside
      the liver and takes on a spongy appearance.
      It is then no longer Simple fatty liver disease,
      it is Steatohepatitis.
      http://www.medicinenet.com/fatty_liver/article.htm
      Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fatty_liver

      If the real cause can be found and if it can be
      stopped, then the liver cells may heal and the problem
      could be reversed. However, once the liver cells
      die off and form scar tissue in the liver...then there
      is less chance of recovery.

      There is really no way to be sure why your enzymes
      have become slightly elevated on here. All we can
      tell you is to do things to help yourself until you get
      a final diagnosis from the tests results your doctor
      has done.
      1) No consumption of alcohol
      2) Only take medications prescribed by or approved
      by your doctor.
      3) Don't exercise before having this blood testing done
      and try to have the blood taken close to the same time
      each time they draw blood.
      4) Try to stay as healthy as you can:
      *avoid open salad/food bars that people can cough or
      sneeze into
      *wash hands often and use germ cleaner in between
      *clean door handles, shopping cart handles, bathroom
      fixtures, etc with disinfectant cloths
      *when coming into contact with someone who is sick,
      has been sick, or who you know has been around others
      who are sick...try to stand back from them...preferably
      outdoors in open air or tell them you will talk to them
      later. It is good to wash after being around groups
      of people.

      I hope this has been of some help to you. Best wishes

  47. QUESTION:
    If I can feel my thyroid a bit enlarged is this an overactive or underactive thyroid?
    I have been having trouble getting in to see a doctor a the last couple of weeks my thyroid seems to be enlarged. I have had restricitve sensation on my throat. In the last 24hrs I think I can feel the actual gland just above my breastbone. It makes me gag if I press on it lightly ie like to wash myself there etc.
    Is this sympton of overactive or underactive thyroid if it is thyroid at all.
    Are there any foods that will make this worse or any foods that may help. I have changed my diet recently also.
    I live in a very isolated area with very minimal transport. I will endeavour to try to find a way to get in too see a doctor again tomorrow, Monday however I was wondering if anyone could tell me anything in the meantime.
    Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      Enlarged thryoid can mean under or overactive thyroid. If you are gaining weight, feeling sluggish, or feel cold often, it is probably underactive. If you feel anxious, sweaty, or have been losing weight, it may be overactive. Underactive thyroid slows metabolism down, overactive speeds it up. Either way, you need to consult a doctor for a definite diagnosis.

  48. QUESTION:
    Do birth control pills or any other pills at all really enlarge your breats?
    I heard that BC pills makes women breats bigger, is it true. Or did anyone who used or ate anything at all found side effects of bigger breasts?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, some birth controls have been known to increase the bust size, but at a cost of possible health issues and it's certainly not a reason to take certain BCP's just to increase your breast size.

      Any birth control with anti-androgenic properties and high oestrogen content such as Diane35 and possibly Yasmin (which are also know to treat acne and other androgenic disorders) have been known to increase bust size.

      What is actually happening, is that oestrogen is becoming the dominent hormones and this is known to increase the growth of breast ttissues. Howver, oestrogen dominence can lead to all kinds of problems including the following:

      Increase in allergies
      Breast tenderness, mastitis and fibrocystic breasts
      Breast cancer, cervical cancer, endometrial cancer
      Cervical dysphasia
      Auto-immune disease
      Early onset of annovulatory cycles
      Polycystic ovaries
      Uterine fibroids
      Infertility due to luteal phase failure
      Sperm counts are down over 50%
      Depression, anxiety and panic attacks
      Mood swings, agitation, irritability
      PMS, Chronic fatigue
      Craving for sweets
      Hypoglycaemia
      Memory loss and foggy thinking, loss of concentration
      Decreased libido
      Early onset of menstruation, irregular periods
      Premenopausal bone loss
      Osteoporosis
      Thyroid problems, sluggish metabolism
      Weight gain and water retention
      High blood pressure
      Increased risk of blood clots and strokes
      Migraine headaches
      Gall bladder disease
      Zinc/copper imbalance
      Magnesium deficiency

      As you can see, the risks really outweight any possible benefits. HTH : )

  49. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of Hypoactive thyroid and Hyperactive thyroid? What is the treatment for both?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of hypothyroidism: Fatigue, decreased heart rate, progressive hearing loss, weight gain, problems with memory and concentration, depression, goiter (enlarged thyroid gland), muscle pain or weakness, loss of interest in sex, numb, tingling hands, dry skin, swollen eyelids, dryness, loss, or premature graying of hair, extreme sensitivity to cold, constipation, irregular menstrual periods, hoarse voice.

      Symptoms of hyperthyroidism: Weight loss with increased appetite, shortness of breath and fatigue, intolerance to heat, heart palpitations, increased frequency of bowel movements, weak muscles, tremors, anxiety, and difficulty sleeping. Women may also notice decreased menstrual flow and irregular menstrual cycles.

  50. QUESTION:
    Do you have to have a Thyroid problem to have PCOS?
    i had a test done to check my thyroid and it came back fine, but yet i still have long cycles.I only had four periods last year .Please help .
    Also how does the doctor find out you have pcos? Because I`ve had alot of ultrasounds done and only one came back as a possible pcos.But the two after that one came back fine.

    • ANSWER:
      No, you don't have to have a thyroid problem to have PCOS, though many women with one will have the other. Women with PCOS tend to have a mother or sister with PCOS. Researchers also think insulin could be linked to PCOS. Insulin is a hormone that controls the change of sugar, starches, and other food into energy for the body to use or store. For many women with PCOS, their bodies have problems using insulin so that too much insulin is in the body. Excess insulin appears to increase production of androgen. This hormone is made in fat cells, the ovaries, and the adrenal gland. Levels of androgen that are higher than normal can lead to acne, excessive hair growth, weight gain, and problems with ovulation. There is no single test to diagnose PCOS. Your doctor will take a medical history, perform a physical exam, and possibly take some tests to rule out other causes of your symptoms. The doctor will want to measure your blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and waist size. He'll want to check for areas of increased hair growth, so try to allow the natural hair growth for a few days before the visit. You might have a pelvic exam to see if your ovaries are enlarged or swollen by the increased number of small cysts. A vaginal ultrasound also might be used to examine the ovaries for cysts and check out the endometrium (the lining of the uterus). The uterine lining may become thicker if your periods are not regular. You also might have blood taken to check your hormone levels (including insulin) and to measure glucose (sugar) levels.

enlarged thyroid and weight gain