Symptoms Of Underactive Thyroid In Dogs

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever had a pet dog that was diagnosed with an underactive thyroid?
    I took my dog to the vet today for boosters and they noticed she had a little patch of hair missing ftom her tail. She asked if Lucy chewed on that area and I have never seen her do that. So she asked if she could test her thyroid...with a blood test and it came back at the lowest end of the normal range. She said we would have to retest in 6 months and if it dips below that magic mark on the scale, she would have to go on meds, twice daily for a month. If you have experience with this, please tell me what you know. We love her dearly, but at the same time, she is a dog. What would an underactive thyroid mean for her? Just curious...please don't judge me about saying she is only a dog. She is overly loved in our home...I just don't want to throw money at the vet if I don't have to.

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism is a fairly common condition in dogs. The good news is that it's also fairly easy and pretty cheap to treat. Usually dogs go on thyroid medication (my vet uses thyrosin) often just one pill twice daily. Dogs that are treated (especially if they are caught early before symptoms are advanced) live very normal lives, usually they just urinate a little more because of the thyrosin. Dogs that are not treated are more prone to infections, obeisity, and dramatic (and sometimes dangerous) changes in temperament.

  2. QUESTION:
    At what point do you euthanize a dog like this?
    Please don't judge us. This is one of the hardest things we've ever had to think about... This dog has been my best friend since I was 4 years old. And just as important part of the family as any of us humans are...
    He's now an 11 year old dog. And within the last 6 months he has become fear aggressive towards my other 2 dogs. Which we've had for 3 years... It just randomly started happening for no reason. One of them would turn the corner and he would catch sight of them and start freaking out and growling. They tolerate it, they just sit there and listen to him growl, I calm him down, but then a few minutes later he starts up again. And even though we have trained our 2 dogs to ignore his growls, they obey for a while, but then they just get tired of the growling which they are perceiving as a challenge or threat and one of them will snap on him... They don't even look him in the eye anymore, and try to avoid rooms that he is in. My 3 year old dog will sit at the enterance of HIS own room if the old dog is in it, until someone tells him it is okay to enter, for fear of disturbing him because we have taught them the words "settle" and "leave" when around him, when we say "settle" they know to calm down and don't freak him out. And "leave" they will get up and walk away from him.
    We've taken him to the vet and he has no health issues, no poor eye sight, the only thing is he was a little overweight, which we cut back on his treats and started taking him on longer walks (so he lost 5 pounds)
    We try to keep him seperated from the other 2 dogs any time his nerves are bad. I will put him in my room and sit with him, gently pet him, and sing softly too him until he falls asleep. But when he wakes up he wants to go see the dogs. He will whine, so we let him out to go see them. Then he immediately starts growling out of fear. He freezes and is unable to move he is so scared. Just stands there bug eyed and terrified... We say "NO, ignore" to the dogs, and they do, for a long time, until he starts getting really loud and they've had enough of it.
    There's no reason for his fear aggression. If he wouldn't growl these 2 dogs would never snap at him. They're super friendly and docile. They all 3 used to get along like peas in a pod. Until one day his whole attitude changed for no reason.

    We all just feel really exhausted, we've looked into dog anxiety medications, tested a Benzodiazepine on him but he didn't react well to it. We're just at a loss of what to do.
    -- I want to stress that my old dog doesn't have a MEAN aggressive bone in his body, it's purely fear aggressive. --

    • ANSWER:
      Has your dog’s thyroid function been checked and if it has what was the result because perhaps it was a false negative.

      If the thyroid gland is not working properly and underactive weight gain is one of the symptoms as is irritability and aggression which is out of character for the dog.

      The reason I mentioned a false negative is that a borderline normal result could still mean the dog has not been diagnosed with and therefore treated for hypothyroidism, as some vets will not prescribe soloxine to normalise the thyroid if the result is not below the range of normal.

      I suggest you either have the dog tested or check the result with your local vet and if it is borderline normal discuss putting the dog on thyroid medication. If that is the underlying cause his behavior should change back to what it was before as his thyroid is managed by medication such as soloxine which is extremely effective and cheap.

  3. QUESTION:
    My lab has diabetes insipidus, what are the side effects of Desmopressin?
    He is only 6/12 and was diagnosed w/ diabetes insipidus last Ocotober and has been on Desmopressin the synthetic hormone in an eye drop form since Oct. He went from an active dog to a lifeless stuffed animal, he doesn't want to do anything he used to do. He is also on thyroid meds. He was just at the vet last month and all of his levels are normal. Does anyone know the side effects of desmopressin b.c. I think that is causing all of his terrible side effects. I just want my old dog back :(
    We have spent over ,000 on Koby and this disorder. We get him tested every three months. We do not have any children yet so he is like our son and we will do anything it takes to get him back to his normal self.

    • ANSWER:
      This is something I found when researching DI...

      Therapy is not mandatory for DI as long as the pet has unlimited access to water, and is kept in an environment where constant urination is not a problem. This usually applies to outdoor pets. Therapy with DDAVP can be administered intermittently, when severe thirst and excess urination is especially undesirable, for example, if guests are visiting. Unrestricted access to water is absolutely imperative.

      Follow-up

      Optimal treatment for a pet with diabetes insipidus requires both home and professional care, with follow up being critical. Administer prescribed medications and alert your veterinarian if you are experiencing problems treating your pet. Follow up includes:

      Periodic rechecks by your veterinarian, especially if the diabetes insipidus is suspected to be caused by a tumor affecting the part of the brain responsible for making ADH.

      Seek immediate veterinary care if any illness develops that causes vomiting or causes the pet to reduce his water intake, as there is a risk of life-threatening dehydration if water is withdrawn from pets with DI for even a few hours.

      Does your dog have unlimited access to plenty of fresh water? Did the vet do plenty of tests to rule out other illnesses which can also have the same symptoms of DI?

      The diagnostic tests recommended will help differentiate DI from these other conditions that can cause excessive thirst and urination:

      Diabetes mellitus (excessive sugar in the blood)

      Renal glycosuria (excessive sugar in the urine, but not diabetic)

      Chronic kidney failure

      Pyometra (infection of the uterus)

      Hypercalcemia, a condition of excessively high calcium levels in the blood

      Liver failure

      Hyperadrenocorticism, also called Cushing's disease, a condition of overactive adrenal glands

      Pyelonephritis, an infection of the kidneys

      Hypokalemia (low potassium levels in the blood)

      Hypoadrenocorticism, also called Addison's disease, a condition of underactive adrenal glands

      Hyperthyroidism (excessive thyroid activity)

      Acromegaly (excessive production of growth hormone)

      Psychogenic polydipsia (excessive drinking due to psychological reasons, such as a change in the pet's environment

      I'd definitely talk to the vet about other forms of treatment, such as:

      Treatment In-depth

      Desmopressin acetate (also called DDAVP) is a synthetic form of the hormone ADH. It is the standard therapy for central DI. It comes in two forms: injection and nasal drops. The nasal spray can be transferred to a sterile eye dropper bottle and applied to the eye if the dog won't tolerate nasal drops. One to four drops administered once or twice a day usually controls the clinical signs. (which you are currently using)

      Chlorpropamide may reduce urine output in some dogs, although results can be inconsistent. Severe forms of central DI often don't respond.

      Thiazide diuretics – while it may seem paradoxical to give a dog with DI a diuretic to increase urine output, the net result is usually a reduction in overall urine output.

      Salt restriction has a net effect of reducing urine output, and may be used sometimes as the sole therapy for central DI.

      Good luck.

  4. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know of any side effects for spaying your dog?
    I'm getting my puppy, Lily, spayed next week. I'm just wondering are there any side effects that could possibly happen?

    Also, I'm going to allow my puppy(once she gets the stitches out) to sleep in my bed(once she is house-broken). The problem is the side of my bed has wood, and I'm afraid that she'll chew up my wood. Is there anyway to stop/prevent this?

    Do you have any good puppy food recommendations?(She is a Border Collie/Beagle mix)

    Thank you!!!

    • ANSWER:
      These are the only few pros for neutering a ***** (both health and behavioural)
      1.lowered mammary cancer risk- only if they're spayed early (before 3rd heat)

      2.removal of pyrometra risk. Pyrometra is a serious and potential fatal womb infection suffered by the entire bitches. It is triggered by changes to the womb lining over successive heats

      3.removal of heat cycles

      4.removal of risk of pregnancy and pseudo-pregnancy symptoms (such as nesting behaviour, milk production, and toy hoarding/nurturing)

      Male neutering benefits and behavioural
      1.Prevention of testicular tumours

      2.prevention of later prostate problems

      3.decrease in inter male status (dominance aggression, urine marking, male roaming and mounting behaviour)

      Potential health downsides in neutering/spayi g in all dogs/
      1.invreased bone tumours and hip dysphasia in breeds who are more prone to these conditions, especially if they are neutered before 1 year of age

      2.increased risk of spleen and heart cancers, most commonly found in breeds such as German sheperds and retrievers

      3.increased risk of joint and ligament problems

      4.increased risk of incontinence/ urinary infections in middle aged to older spayed female dogs

      5.heightened risk of obesity

      6.some studies have now suggested a link between neutering/spaying and a higher risk later of developing hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid), symptoms include weigjt gain and lethargy

      7.decreased coat quality due to hormonal change

      Potential behavioural downsides due to spaying/neutering
      1.an increase in some types of aggression such as fear aggression, possessive and owner directed aggression and territorial aggression

      2.phobic, and anxiety-related, and obsessive behaviours are also all thought to be exacerbated by spaying and neutering in some dogs

      Hope this helps :)

      Add- People who are saying there a NO "cons" don't no much!! There's more cons than pros

      Here's a link I've just found that also has loads nore info-http://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/health/articles/spaying-female-dog.html

      For dog food I would recommend blue buffalo or James welbeloved.. Both good foods

      Clockwork_Knight's your supposed to be a "top contributer" looks like you just talk out you ass if you think there are no cons!! Looks like you no shit all about dogs..

  5. QUESTION:
    Has anyone's dog ever experienced thyroid problems?
    Canines, as well as people have a thyroid gland. When a dog's thyroid is underactive it is referred to as "Hypothyroidism."

    If you have been thru this with your pet, I am interested in knowing what sorts of symptoms your dog had and how the problem was resolved.

    • ANSWER:
      I had an Italian Greyhound with this.
      Bad coat/hair loss, eye problems, loss of energy..............a pill a day and the problem was taken care of.
      Relatively cheap and she lived another 8 years and passed with unrelated condition at age 15.

  6. QUESTION:
    why should i castrate my Jackrussell dog?
    iv two dogs. a bitch and a dog.both jackrussells. they had a litter together and she has since been neutered. he has still gotten his bits but iv been told he must be done. can someone explain to me why he must be done so i can sum up the pros and cons.kind regards

    • ANSWER:
      These are the only few pros for neutering a ***** (both health and behavioural)
      1.lowered mammary cancer risk- only if they're spayed early (before 3rd heat)

      2.removal of pyrometra risk. Pyrometra is a serious and potential fatal womb infection suffered by the entire bitches. It is triggered by changes to the womb lining over successive heats

      3.removal of heat cycles

      4.removal of risk of pregnancy and pseudo-pregnancy symptoms (such as nesting behaviour, milk production, and toy hoarding/nurturing)

      Male neutering benefits and behavioural
      1.Prevention of testicular tumours

      2.prevention of later prostate problems

      3.decrease in inter male status (dominance aggression, urine marking, male roaming and mounting behaviour)

      Potential health downsides in neutering/spayi g in all dogs/
      1.invreased bone tumours and hip dysphasia in breeds who are more prone to these conditions, especially if they are neutered before 1 year of age

      2.increased risk of spleen and heart cancers, most commonly found in breeds such as German sheperds and retrievers

      3.increased risk of joint and ligament problems

      4.increased risk of incontinence/ urinary infections in middle aged to older spayed female dogs

      5.heightened risk of obesity

      6.some studies have now suggested a link between neutering/spaying and a higher risk later of developing hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid), symptoms include weigjt gain and lethargy

      7.decreased coat quality due to hormonal change

      Potential behavioural downsides due to spaying/neutering
      1.an increase in some types of aggression such as fear aggression, possessive and owner directed aggression and territorial aggression

      2.phobic, and anxiety-related, and obsessive behaviours are also all thought to be exacerbated by spaying and neutering in some dogs

      I wouldn't bother tbh, because it costs enough as it it and if you have your dog spayed he's may have problems and you'll have to pay out even more money!!

      Hope this answers your question..

  7. QUESTION:
    My cat has what looks like dandruff on his skin,any idea what that could be?

    • ANSWER:
      Dandruff

      Dandruff: A health cat healthy have a soft skin free from scabs and dandruff. If dandruff is present, it is a possible sign of fleas, tapeworm, allergic dermatitis, or some other ailment. Consult a vet.

      Dogs and cats don't wear blue blazers or black scarves, so dandruff doesn't show up as much as it does on people. But they get it just as often, usually for the same reason: Their skin is a little drier than it should be, and it is flaking off fast enough to become visible in their coats, says Peter S. Sakas, D.V.M., a veterinarian in private practice in Niles, Illinois.

      Some pets have dry skin simply because that is how nature made them. Vets call this condition dry seborrhea. "The itching can drive your pet crazy," says Robert Rizzitano, D.V.M., a veterinarian in private practice in Los Angeles. Dry skin and dandruff are much more common in the winter, he adds, because indoor heat removes large amounts of moisture from the air. Frequent bathing can also lead to dry skin.

      Dandruff itself isn't a problem, but the dry skin that causes it may be. Pets with dry skin get very itchy. Since dogs and cats don't know when to stop scratching, they may dig in so hard that they will scratch themselves raw, getting skin infections in the process. Allergies, parasites, or infections of any kind can also be a cause of flaky skin.

      Dry skin and dandruff may be a sign that something is wrong in the diet. Dogs and cats need certain nutrients, especially fatty acids, to keep their skin healthy. Most pet foods contain plenty of fatty acids. But some dogs and cats either don't get enough fatty acids or they need more than the usual amounts. This can disturb the skin's normal balance, leading to dry skin and dandruff, Dr. Sakas says.

      A tiny parasite known as walking dandruff can cause large white flakes to appear on the neck and back. It can cause Fur loss as well. All pets can get walking dandruff, but it is most common in puppies.

      It doesn't happen often, but dandruff may be a sign that the thyroid gland is underactive and producing too little hormone, a condition called hypothyroidism. Other symptoms of thyroid disease include Weight gain, thinning fur, and a loss of energy.

      See Your Vet If...

      * Your pet is gaining weight or is lethargic
      * She is losing fur in places
      * She is scratching a lot or developing skin sores
      * Your pet spends a lot of time indoors in the winter
      * Your pet is shedding or scratching more than usual
      * He has scales, bald patches, or a rash
      * He has severe dandruff or dry skin
      * His fur is greasy or smelly even after baths
      * Your pet has broken out in hives and is having trouble breathing
      * He has a bad sunburn
      * There has been a significant change in skin color, or the skin seems loose
      * There is a lump or swelling beneath his skin
      * Your pet has a sore on the skin that won't heal
      * The skin of the lips, abdomen, or rectal area is yellow
      * There are red or purple dots or splotches on his skin

      That being said, my cats get dry flaky skin sometimes, and since they don't have an infection or anything, I use Nova Pearls spray to help moisten their skin and it works pretty well.
      Good luck!!

  8. QUESTION:
    What's causing my joint and muscle stiffness/ache? ?
    My old health problem has re-surfaced since I've been around my flat-mates new dog. Are these symptoms of an allergy? I feel that my joints are inflamed for some reason. Is it diet..or food allergy. Please help. Been to doc before...he did not offer any useful cause or advice.

    • ANSWER:
      Allergies are possible.. but It could be a thyroid condition. You did not say if you were male/female but they are more common in women (and fairly common in general) I have hypothyroidism -which is an under-active thyroid (am 22 years old) and some days I feel like I am 90. Symptoms for hypothyroidism include stiff muscles and joints (amoing other things). Check out web MD for more info and to see if any of your other symptoms match up. It's a simple blood test the doctor can do, and if you end up having a underactive thyroid it's as simple as taking a pill everyday to feel better. Good luck!!

  9. QUESTION:
    underactive thyroid?
    I was just wondering if anyone out there has an underactive thyroid? How long have you had it and how do you feel physically? How did you feel when you where first diagnosed? Explain symptoms please. Any advice for me as to feeling better.
    I have an underactive thyroid and have had it for 5 years. Got it after I had my daughter and stopped breast feeding. I am on medicine and get blood work done regularly. Still feel kind of sick alot. Have had multiple tests on evrything else including my brain. Just wondering if anyone else out there has problems with it.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had hypo thyroids for 13 yrs..I have been on synthroid for yrs and not to lie to you I have never felt they way I used to..I wake up tired and sometimes so depressed that I can't handle life ..I have gained a lot of weight but still not as much as a lot of others.I have no self confidence no more and I have alot of fears and anxiety.Going to walk the dog is hard now..Making supper for family is hard..I stay sick and get sick easy..It's like I no longer have a immune system..I have mood swings like I have bi polar and severe menstrual problems.Sometime I don't even have a period at all for months and then I have one that last a week and then off for a week and starts over again..I really don't eat alot and still gain weight and it is very difficult for me to loose weight even when I follow a doctors plan..My blood pressure is low and really that is only the one good thing about this disorder..I am cold all the time and in the summer I can't take the heat at all.I don't sun burn but sweat like a hog...I hope you find something to help you and if you do let me know Please..Thanks and Good Luck....

  10. QUESTION:
    5 week puppy staff/pit scared to go outside?
    it shiver help

    • ANSWER:
      get it a warm house and make it a soft cozy bed for your dog Your new puppy shivers for many of the same reasons that humans do. He may be cold--shivering is the body's way of warming itself. Or, your puppy may be suffering from nervousness or a fever. Less commonly, your new puppy's shivering or trembling may be a symptom of a more serious illness or disease, such as anemia or hypothyroidism.

      Cold
      1. Puppies are susceptible to cold. A newborn puppy depends on her mother to keep her warm because she cannot regulate her body temperatures until she is more than 3 weeks old. Puppies need a draft-free room where the temperature is between 70 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit. A carrier lined with towels or blankets can also provide warmth.
      Nervousness
      2. Some puppies tremble because they are frightened by new people or circumstances. Socializing your puppy and getting him accustomed to new situations gradually can help allay nervous shivering.
      Breed
      3. Some breeds, especially smaller ones, are more high-strung, and those puppies will tend to tremble more. There's little you can do to prevent that type of shivering and generally it is not harmful to your puppy. In addition, certain breeds, such as Chihuahuas and Italian greyhounds, cannot withstand the cold as well as heavy-coated breeds like huskies or Samoyeds. These puppies may need a dog sweater or other cold-weather wear.
      Illness
      4. Several illnesses can cause your puppy to tremble. They include lupus (an immune system problem), hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid), calcium deficiency, fever, and epilepsy. Neurological problems can also cause shivering. A vet will perform tests to diagnose these illnesses.
      Hypoglycemia
      5. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is a concern for toy breeds. At first, your puppy will appear listless, then begin to shiver or tremble. As the condition progresses, the puppy can become comatose. The condition can be fatal if not treated promptly. Treatment includes administering supplements such as Nutri-Cal and keeping the puppy warm.
      Warning
      6. Contact your veterinarian if your puppy's shivering is persistent or severe and if she seems to be shivering for no apparent reason.

      Read more: Why Does a New Puppy Shiver? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5081367_new-puppy-shiver.html#ixzz10NjBjIB8

  11. QUESTION:
    dog skin problems?
    my springer spaniel went to the groomer last week and the groomer noticed some bumps on her back and legs. the groomer popped the cysts and said some stuff came out like when you pop a pimple. the holes that are left are big enough to stick a pencil in, it is gross. my dog is acting fine but I went ahead and made a vet appt but they cant see her for another week and a half. anyone experience anything like this?? she is 8 years old and has always been in good health except for an occasional ear infection. thanks for your help.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, Please ask your vet to check your dog's thyroid function - preferably with a full thyroid panel. Skin problems and ear infections are both classic clinical symptoms for Hypothyroidism. The lesions could be due to an underactive thyroid gland, or due to environmental allergies like grasses or insect bites. However, allergies have got an underlying cause, and more often than not this underlying cause is malfunctioning thyroids.

  12. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroid. Its very long since Ive had fever.why ?
    I am taking Thyroxin 150mcg daily. whenever there is a infection, I feel tired, body pains, headache and all that EXCEPT that I DONT run HIGH TEMPERATURE. Like everybody else, after taking in proper drugs, I feel alright after a couple of days.
    During my chilhood when I have fever, I used to run high body temperature up to 104F. After the age of 28 or 29,there is no high body temperature. Even when I go to a doctor, he does not believe that Iam running fever and that i need medication and treatment.
    I am a generally healthy person. whats wrong with me?

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism is the disease state in humans and animals caused by insufficient production of thyroid hormone by the thyroid gland. There are several distinct causes for chronic hypothyroidism in human beings, the most common being Hashimoto's thyroiditis (an autoimmune disease) and radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism. Historically, iodine deficiency was the most common cause of hypothyroidism world-wide. The disease may also be caused by a lack of thyroid gland or a deficiency of hormones from either the hypothalamus or the pituitary.

      Secondary hypothyroidism occurs if the pituitary gland does not create enough thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) to induce the thyroid gland to create a sufficient quantity of thyroxine. Although not every case of secondary hypothyroidism has a clear-cut cause, it is usually caused when the pituitary is damaged by a tumor, radiation, or surgery so that it is no longer able to instruct the thyroid to make enough hormone.

      Tertiary hypothyroidism, also called hypothalamic-pituitary-axis hypothyroidism, results when the hypothalamus fails to instruct the pituitary to produce sufficient TSH.

      Hypothyroidism can also result from sporadic inheritance, sometimes autosomal recessive. It is a relatively common disease in purebred domestic dogs as well, and can have a hereditary basis in dogs.

      It is claimed by some in the water fluoridation controversy that hypothyroidism is related to fluoride.

      The severity of hypothyroidism varies widely. Some have few overt symptoms, others with moderate symptoms can be mistaken for having other diseases and states. Advanced hypothyroidism may cause severe complications including cardiovasular and psychiatric myxedema.

      Thyroxine, or 3:5,3':5' tetra­iodothyronine (often abbreviated as T4) is the major hormone secreted by the follicular cells of the thyroid gland.

      T4 is transported in blood, with 99.95% of the secreted T4 being protein bound, principally to thyroxine ­binding globulin (TBG) and to a lesser extent to thyroxine binding pre­albumin (TBPA) and albumin.

      T4 is involved in controlling the rate of metabolic processes in the body and influencing physical development.

      Note: Thyroxine is a prohormone and a reservoir for the active thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3), T4 being converted as required in the tissues by deiodinases.

      This medicine is primarily indicated for the treatment of hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid gland), where thyroxine is used as replacement therapy in people having a lower thyroid function than normal. Treatment is usually long term as it is replacing thyroid hormone the body is not producing. The dosage is usually adjusted according to response and blood test results.

      Patients with heart disease (angina) should start the medication cautiously on a low dose and build up as needed under medical supervision.

      Other cautions to be aware of include:

      Adrenal insufficiency

      Breastfeeding

      Thyrotoxic crisis ('thyroid storm')

      Elderly - slowly on a low dose and build up if needed.

      Diabetics (raises sugar levels)

      Side effects:

      Dose related:

      chest pain (also an increase in heartbeat)

      muscle cramps

      stomach upset

      weight loss

      restlessness and insomnia

      headache

      sweating and hot flushes

      Side effects usually reside after a dose reduction is made by your doctor.

      Thyroxine increases the effect of warfarin, tricyclic antidepressants and amiodarone.

      Oral contraceptives, anticonvulsants, cholestyramine and rifampicin may reduce efficacy.

  13. QUESTION:
    Why do I feel like this? Please read?
    I think I'm depressed. I feel like I'm going to go crazy sometimes, and my brain just overloads and I feel I'm just going to explode out of it or something. Its really hard to describe. Why do i get this. I can't cry. I get so sad to the point of suicidal, but I can't cry no matter how much I feel like it. But a few days ago, I got so mad at something that I completely broke down and cried. But I wasn't sad at all, it was pure anger. Even when people tell me to 'go kill myself' or that 'nobody likes me' it still isn't enough to make me cry. like it upsets me, but i dont know, i sort of brush it off somehow, its really weird. And my friends dog died and I felt bad for it, but I was having a laughing fit and it went on for hours. She thought i was crazy. But I seriously couldn't stop. It was so bad. I don't even know what emotion I'm feeling most of the time. Although I'm sure I'm not happy. I get angry at people all the time for really stupid things, to the point I would stab them.

    • ANSWER:
      Omega 3 fatty acids from fish oil can help with depression. See the links:
      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100621111238.htm
      http://www.health.com/health/condition-article/0,,20188472,00.html

      Depression can come from underactive thyroid or hypothyroidism.
      You should see your doctor and ask for the following blood tests: TSH, FT4, FT3 and most importantly anti-thyroid antibodies.
      Only they can reveal if you have a problem with your thyroid, like Hashimoto's thyroiditis.
      Normal TSH is 0.3-3. (Some doctors still use the out-dated reference range of 0.5-5.5)
      Some doctors are very misinformed and not knowledgeable about thyroid conditions.

      See the symptoms below:
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hypothyroidism/ds00353/dsection=symptoms
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hashimotos-disease/DS00567/DSECTION=symptoms
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com

  14. QUESTION:
    will our westie need to be "done"?
    first of all we have no intentions of breeding him, and we have no other dog.. so does it really have to be done?.. please no hate i was just wondering

    • ANSWER:
      These are the only few pros for neutering a ***** (both health and behavioural)
      1.lowered mammary cancer risk- only if they're spayed early (before 3rd heat)

      2.removal of pyrometra risk. Pyrometra is a serious and potential fatal womb infection suffered by the entire bitches. It is triggered by changes to the womb lining over successive heats

      3.removal of heat cycles

      4.removal of risk of pregnancy and pseudo-pregnancy symptoms (such as nesting behaviour, milk production, and toy hoarding/nurturing)

      Male neutering benefits and behavioural
      1.Prevention of testicular tumours

      2.prevention of later prostate problems

      3.decrease in inter male status (dominance aggression, urine marking, male roaming and mounting behaviour)

      Potential health downsides in neutering/spayi g in all dogs/
      1.invreased bone tumours and hip dysphasia in breeds who are more prone to these conditions, especially if they are neutered before 1 year of age

      2.increased risk of spleen and heart cancers, most commonly found in breeds such as German sheperds and retrievers

      3.increased risk of joint and ligament problems

      4.increased risk of incontinence/ urinary infections in middle aged to older spayed female dogs

      5.heightened risk of obesity

      6.some studies have now suggested a link between neutering/spaying and a higher risk later of developing hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid), symptoms include weigjt gain and lethargy

      7.decreased coat quality due to hormonal change

      Potential behavioural downsides due to spaying/neutering
      1.an increase in some types of aggression such as fear aggression, possessive and owner directed aggression and territorial aggression

      2.phobic, and anxiety-related, and obsessive behaviours are also all thought to be exacerbated by spaying and neutering in some dogs

      I was debating whether to get my westie done but when I read this in "my dog" magazine i thought theres no point really..
      Hope this helps :)

  15. QUESTION:
    Is the Treatment of hyperactive thyroid in dogs expensive?
    My dog fits all the symptoms and i'm going to take him to a vets to get him check but i would like to know if there are any vets reading this (in the UK) what is the price of the medication per year... i hear the dog has to take a tablet each day?
    To clarify it is Underactive! The vet has taken bloods and the result was our dogs count was under the normal range, she then charged us an extra £25 to have more tests done on the blood to confirm it. She said in this regard anything under 3 is good. Our dog was 1.5. She now intents for us to take a break for 6 weeks and come back to have the tests all over again.... all this while our dog is not on treatment

    At this point we feel ripped off as we've paid over £100 in total for 2 blood tests and a general checkup with the vet and all we've been told is to come back in 6 weeks to have the tests done again (another £100 down the drain

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism is one of the health conditions known to affect my breed the Dobermann and fairly common.

      There are broadly speaking two types, overactive (a dog is thin not lean and weight unresponsive to an increase in amount of food or underactive (despite reducing food and regular exercise the dog continues to gain weight and may show uncharacteristic aggression)

      To diagnose the condition a dog has a thyroid function test (blood samples taken) at the local veterinary practice and then depending on the result prescribed the appropriate dose of mediation to normalize the thyroid function (my b*tch has Soloxine at 0.5mg two tablets daily and has been active, with nice lean muscling for years).

      The cost depends on where you purchase the medication from. I order Soloxine from Viovet because it is considerably less expensive and then ask my local veterinary practice for a prescription, which is sent to Viovet as they quite rightly do not dispatch prescribed veterinary medication without it.

  16. QUESTION:
    Help... I have a tyroid issue which has led to weight issues : -(?
    I was always fit and had a nice body...even thin! I had an overactive thyroid which doctor could not help without a procedure of reversing it to underactive which led to a large weight gain. Now I maintain my weight, but have a hard time losing...REALLY hard time without diet pills which are not safe....What to do? I know, I know diet & exercise, but any paticular plans that truely work? By the way I am EXTREMELY active 2 kids, 2 dogs, full time server in fast casual dining....so laziness is not an issue. Any help would be SOOOOOOO appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      According to the Thyroid Foundation of America, the answer is…YES!

      It is estimated that tens of millions of women have a “borderline” thyroid malfunction and most don’t even know it. This problem appears to be particularly prominent with women in perimenopause and menopause (ages 35 to 55).

      EstroThin™ is a comprehensive nutricieutical grade liquid extract specifically formulated to address weight gain symptoms caused by reduced thyroid function and menopausal disorders. EstroThin™ includes thyroid specific active ingredients that help:

      Control appetite
      Increase metabolic rate and number of calories burned
      Eliminate diet failure caused by a lack of thyroid-specific nutritional support
      Relieve other thyroid symptoms such as fatigue and mood swings

  17. QUESTION:
    BIG over weight problem with my dog?
    OK. so my dog is over weight by like about 10 pounds and it is starting to get impossible for her to loose it. I have not been giving her treats i have been cutting back on her food 1/4 and i have been playing with her in the house but it is not working!! It is like 5 below outside and it is way too icy and cold for my dog to be out their. My dog is 3 in a half years old and she is a Pembrokie Welsh Corgi. I am also starting to get worried because now she is limping. I think she is limping because she cant carry herself. I already asked my vet what i should do and i have been doing it but that dose not work!! I think she is gaining weight instead of loosing it! Their are pills to help drugs loose weight but i don't want to put her on any crazy drugs that might make her sick. Thank you so much for anyone who answers.

    • ANSWER:
      If you have been feeding your dog nothing but its daily measured ration of food, preferably split into at least two meals, & you know that no-one has been slipping your dog any extra food because it always looks hungry or sorry for itself, then the next step would be to rule out an underlying medical reason for the weight gain.

      A possible health condition is an underactive thyroid, as a common symptom is weight gain, which an owner cannot reduce by diet & exercise. This condition is common in my breed, the Dobermann, & following a thyroid function test she was prescribed Soloxine tablets & her progress is being closely monitored by my local vet.

      My b*tch is now steadily losing weight at a healthy rate & her comfort & mobility noticeably improved.

      If your b*tch is limping that is also something your local vet should check as it may possibly be a hip or joint problem.

  18. QUESTION:
    my older dog has a skin and hair loss problem.?
    ok it is actually my brothers dog that is visisting right now and he is about 10 yr old he is a mutt he has sharpe chow and lab that i know of in him. he has dry flaky skin and his hair falls out very easily and alot. i just gave him a bath with apple cider vineger but it stinks. is there anything else i can do to help this poor fellow. and before anyone starts saying u should take him to vet or be responsible and take him to a vet he goes to vet in regular basis in st louis but they dont tell us what to do or whats cousing it they have ran tests like blood and a skin scrap but he still has hir loss from tail up is back to the back of the head. any ideas or info will be greatly appreciated thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Because you say he is older, I would suspect that his thyroid is underactive. You are describing classic symptoms. A blood test would be needed to confirm it, but it's usually easily treatable with an inexpensive daily pill. You would want to check for this because an underactive thyroid affects every system in his body. Obviously that does not help you today though.

      You can try adding fish oil to his food to give him more Omega 3's and Omega 6's for now, but again it's not a quick fix. I'd think it would take weeks to notice the difference.

      Lay off the bathing--it will only dry his skin out further.

      Brewer's Yeast tablets also can help with skin and coat issues.

  19. QUESTION:
    A little bit weird.... but our dog... ?
    PoPo, stands for Poor Pitiful Orphan.... is, I think an American Bulldog,
    or maybe Pit and American, we are not sure, he was a rescue... anyway, the dog loves fire.... No fear of it what so ever... let me give some back ground...When we got him, he was half starved and it was winter time , and this was all at the deer camp mind you.... so, anyway, he would get as close to the camp fire as he could, and even be so close we would have to watch him carefuly and pull him back to keep him from getting burnt.... He is now 1 1/2 or so in age and LOVES to sleep in front of a heater, and I mean IN FRONT, like right next to it almost hugging it !!! He is an inside dog for many reasons.... 1. we love him dearly.. 2. he has a breathing problem 3. we love him 4. seems to not handle the cold or summer heat, which makes the heater thing very strange !!!!! does any one else have a dog like this or knows of one or knows what I should do ? leave it alone or what ? go in peace...... God bless

    • ANSWER:
      Probably, this is just a personal preference on the part of your dog.

      Sometimes, aversion to cold can be metabolic... usually, an underactive thyroid gland. Other symptoms of this are excessive shedding, overweight (or maintaining weight on very little food), low energy level. If your dog has a couple or more of these symptoms, you might want to have a thyroid test run. If he is hypothyroid, he will be prescribed inexpensive medication that he will need to take twice a day for life... not a biggie!

  20. QUESTION:
    Possible thyroid problem?
    starting when i was 14 and going through puberty i began to gain weight. My activity level was pretty high and i had daily exercise. I was an eventer (equestrian riding) and worked at a local farm. I went swimming, etc. still i gained weight. Now I am 30 years old, still battling with my weight issues. It seems to have gotten worse. i had the norplant inserted in 1999 and removed in 2007. I have one child (born in 99) and have had trouble conceiving since having the norplant.i have tried just about every diet out there. Right now i'm on a raw food diet, only fruits and veggies and i drink ONLY water. I still ride horses daily for at least 1 hour. i clean the stalls, load hay, move grain, work in the yard, AND i walk at least 2 miles per day with my dog. I had lost 3 pounds in a month and then gained 5, lost 4 pounds, gained 3, just recently i went back up to my old weight. so basically NONE lost in a month. Before this I was on a different diet, gained 2 pounds. Before that i even tried the atkins diet, gained weight. Tried Nutrisystem and gained weight. If i don't gain it i stay the same weight, but i cannot lose it. I am 5'4" and need to lose at least 80 pounds to be where i need to be. I'm not looking for a quick fix, but somethings' gotta give. I am out of ideas here! Do you think it could be my thyroid?? i have other symptoms that do match thyroid disorder, but i was tested once and it came back normal. is it hard to get diagnosed with hypothyroid?

    • ANSWER:
      It should be impossible to gain weight while doing Atkins program properly. With thyroid problems, it is possible to not lose weight on Atkins program though. I have major thyroid issues & lost lots of weight at first with Atkins program but then didn't lose weight for years til I started thyroid hormones & have lost 30# a year for the past 2 years with what I thought were maintenance level carbs.

      A slow metabolism will cause weight gain. I would suggest doing the barnes basal temperature at home. Do it at 5a.m. is when temperature is at it's very lowest for 10 days. (make sure you've been asleep at least 4 hours prior to testing) Thyroid lab tests do not catch many cases of thyroid problems (although finding a doctor who won't rely solely on lab tests is a problem) D.O.'s have more training than M.D.'s - I would suggest locating a D.O.

      Carbs trigger insulin (the fat storage hormone) & the blood stream can not release fat unless the body is clear of insulin. If you don't eat enough calories & the body shuts down the metabolism.

      Dr.Barnes suggested someone with thyroid problems should never go below 30g carbs or 1500 calories. I would highly suggest you limit carbs to 9g. per hour to control insulin. This will balance hormones & allow your body to function properly. You may need supplemental thyroid hormones - do not take synthetic only natural hormones (armour brand etc.) Research iodine supplementation also. Educate yourself, do not totally depend on doctors for your health care.

      "barnes basal temperature test" -

      Dr. Barnes recommended that you measure your left underarm temperature for ten days in a row first thing in the morning before doing anything else at all (going to the toilet etc). Movement and activity of any kind raises body temperature and invalidates the results. The thermometer should be shaken down at night before going to sleep to avoid having to do so in the morning (unless of course it is a digital thermometer). Menstruating women should start this ten-day period on the third day of their cycle. Many health care practioners who recommend the test now suggest a longer time period but Dr. Barnes felt 10 days was enough for an accurate assessment of thyroid function.

      The underarm temperature is actually lower than that measured under the tongue so 36.6-36.8C is considered normal in the BBTT. Anything below 36.6C (97.88F) is considered an indicator of possible underactive thyroid function

  21. QUESTION:
    Does my dog have pyometra?
    My vet told me when i went 2 weeks ago that my Jack Russell was pregnant. I then went again yesterday as she is now 8 weeks pregnant (or so we thought) because she does not look much bigger at all. She has only put on 200grams in the last 2 weeks. He palpated her and said that she is not pregnant and that he couldn't feel what he had felt last time. I asked why she has a swollen belly and he said the next thing to suspect is pyometra. She does not have any of the symptoms apart from the swollen belly and my male dogs keeps trying to mount her, both of these are also signs of pregnancy. She is not drinking a lot, is eating normally, has not been sick or had diarrhoea. She has been tired all the time but this we thought was because she was pregnant. I'm still not sure whether she may be pregnant and maybe carrying them up behind her ribs which is why she hasn't got much bigger? I'm taking her for an xray to get this checked out but just wanted to know your opinion to put mind at rest
    I've changed my appointment for this afternoon to get her checked out at a different vets, i won't be using the old one again. When i aksed him what her swollen belly could be he said it could be pyometra but that i wouldn't worry about it too much if she's ok in herself. Luckily i know that pyometra is serious
    Went to see the vet this afternoon. She had a scan and she is not pregnant and does not have pyometra. It is a false pregnancy. Thanks for your answers.

    • ANSWER:
      Glad you are going for x-ray but if you think that she has live pups in there, you are better to get an ultra-sound scan on her, so it wont have any ill-effects on possible pups.

      Could it be a phantom pregnancy?

      If its Pyometra, your vet should have taken her in for an emergency Spay, so Im wondering what your vet is all about? I would get a second opinion, if she has pups inside that have died, that could kill her as can pyometra, without the pups involved, on the other hand if the only symptoms are weight gain and tiredness then it could be something less threatening like an underactive thyroid.

      If she is 8 weeks pregnant you will be starting to notice she is carrying milk /teats change etc 'see' / feel the pups for yourself too, her behaviour may change slightly.

      If it were me I would go to a different Vet, have a scan done then if thats all clear, a blood test, for thyroid function and anything else the vet thinks...

      If anything it will put your mind at ease and possibly save your dogs life.

  22. QUESTION:
    My doberman is losing weight ?
    Over the last few months my dog Blade has been losing weight there is no sign of worms but did worm him anyway, but i am starting to see his rids and never have a been able to see hi ribs before.
    He is very active and eats and drinks plenty and nothing has changed.
    Any ideas if noone can give me any ideas i will of corse take him to the vets, but would like to sort it without the cost if poss.
    Sorry my dog Blade is 4 years of age, i will be taking him to the vets on Monday.
    Thank you very much for the quick response did not know this was that good.

    • ANSWER:
      How old is your Dobermann?

      It could be an overactive thyroid [weight loss is a symptom], which your local vet will be able to test for. One of my Dobermann b*tches had an underactive thyroid [gained weight] & was back to her usual bouncy self after treatment.

      One of my male Dobermann lost weight rapidly [within a period of two weeks] because of aggressive cancer. He had multiple tumours near some of his major organs.

      Do you compete in any active sport with your Dobermann like schutzhund, tracking or agility? If so he may just need an increase in the amount of food you give him.

      There are many benign reasons for weight loss, so try not to worry.

      Hope it all goes well at the vet.

  23. QUESTION:
    my dog is always tired?
    she is 2 years old and she has recently been just wanting to go to sleep. i dont know wats wrong
    its a lhasa apso x poodle and is usually active
    its a lhasa apso x poodle and is usually active
    its a lhasa apso x poodle and is usually active

    • ANSWER:
      There are a lot of possibilities; it could be that she's just going through a phase of not being as playful, as the others have suggested; and underactive thyroid is also a possibility. So is anemia...I'm dealing with this condition in my 11 year old Dachshund right now. A couple of weeks ago, her appetite really dropped- in fact the day I took her to the vet she was completely refusing food. I thought it might be a stomach problem, but the vet did some blood work and said it's anemia. Anemia is when a dog's body is either not producing enough red blood cells, or is destroying the ones it produces. It can be caused by many things, from a tick bite to an injury, a stomach ulcer or exposure to a handful of different chemicals.

      Along with loss of appetite, one of the symptoms is fatigue, so is weakness. Another is that if the anemia is severe, their tongue and gums will turn either whitish or yellowish, instead of pink.

      If she continues to have this issue and starts eating less, you should take her to the vet, because if it's anemia, it's easier to treat the earlier it's caught. And anemia can strike a dog of any age, even puppies.

  24. QUESTION:
    Could I have narcolepsy?
    I fall asleep all the time.. I'm 14, but I'm homeschooled so it's not such a big thing if I fall asleep during the day. It could be because I go to bed late, at like 12-2am, but I can't seem to fall asleep before that. I get up pretty late though, so I get enough sleep. Like 7-9 hours.
    But I am always falling asleep without noticing. It's like I'm just sitting there and all of a sudden it's hard to talk and and my vision gets really blurry. And I can't keep myself awake. It happens a lot in the car, almost every single time I'm in a car it happens. And I don't realize I'm falling asleep until I wake up. And when I wake up I usually can't control myself, like lift my head up, for like 10 seconds. I don't really remember my dreams, but when I do I can never remember if they were real or not, because they were so vivid.
    I've fallen asleep in my driveway before, while taking my dog out. I've fallen asleep standing up before, and didn't realize until after I fell. I've fallen asleep working before (my mom owns a restaurant and I have to work.) I've fallen asleep reading before.. and i never know how long I am sleeping. It feels like such a short time but then it turns out I was asleep for like an hour.
    And when I am sleeping my mom yells at me and I try to get up, but I just can't. I feel so heavy, like I have no control over my body and I just need more sleep.
    I've suggested that I may have narcolepsy to my mom before, but she didn't think I did.
    So, if you don't think I do.. what are some things that can keep me awake? I've tried pinching myself, eating something, drinking something, talking to someone, listening to music, putting windows down (in cars), caffeine. Yeah, I don't really like caffeine anyway, but I've tried it, and it doesn't really work... I just had to go pee a lot, because I drank like four bottles of green tea or something.
    Thanks so much!

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Narcolepsy/Pages/Symptoms.aspx

      http://www.bupa.co.uk/individuals/health-information/directory/u/underactive-thyroid

      http://www.emedicinehealth.com/anemia/page3_em.htm

      Try these sites, i suggest you try to go sleep earlier and eat healthy foods if you already dont :) Thats all i can really suggest. if not sleeping earlier and eating healthier then i suggest you go to the doctors and talk to him/her about it and they will probally ask you questions and give you a blood test to see if theres anything there. Good luck :)

  25. QUESTION:
    What's the best to feed a dog?
    Hi everyone,

    I've got a miniature dachshund who is a little overweight, I was wondering what's the best thing to feed her.

    There is the option of tinned food which is low in fat or I could cook a small chicken each day and feed her some of it (could be more healthy, little/no fat?)

    She is 5.70kg currently, 12.6lbs.

    The only reason I ask if because she has actually put on more weight even on her diet (a small amount of 0.10kg 0.2lbs which is quite a bit for a breed who is only meant to weigh 11lbs), I've increased her output and decreased her input as much as I possibly can.

    Is there anything I can possibly do?

    Thanks for the help in advance.

    Rob

    • ANSWER:
      First, you need to determine if she is truly overweight. Just because breed standard says 11 pounds, and yours is 12, does not mean she is overweight for who she is. She just might be a little bigger. If she is indeed overweight, you need to vet her...the vet will do some blood work to find out if there is a medical reason for overweight...she could have an underactive thyroid, or some other condition of which weight gain is a symptom.
      It is a great thing for you to pay close attention to this, for in this breed, overweight can cause spinal deterioration and you surely do not want that! So, if there is no medical reason...you need to discuss with your vet what the right diet and amount for her is. People here will give you all sorts of information about different diets. What has always worked for my guy is a good, balanced natural kibble. He is 50 pounds and gets 1 cup am, 1 cup pm. I absolutely deduct kibble for training treats, and keep an eye on the treats he does get. 2x a week, instead of kibble, he gets steamed chicken, carrots, string beans and rice that i cook for him. My recipe is 2 handfuls chicken, 1 handful each of vegetables and rice. And I serve him one cup of that. My dog has not changed weight in years...except for up one pound in summer, down one pound in winter. If you wanted to use this guide for your dog...you would have to cut down on the amount. I did have a dachsie mix who was 12 pounds. She ate the same as the big boy...only just 1/3 cup at each meal.
      Dachsies do need exercise...they were bred to be vermin hunters...so make sure also she is getting a good amount of exercise...not just a daily walk...but 2 longer walks..around 45 min each..at a brisk pace...or maybe ball play or tunnel chase where she can stretch and run for a bit.
      Between monitoring the food and making sure she gets enough exercise, she should be fine..as long as it is not a medical issue. Hope this was helpful...good luck.

  26. QUESTION:
    Why is my hair always falling out i shed like a dog?
    my hair is pretty thick im bot balding but it seems like i should be my dad is bald does this mean i could be? make it stop

    • ANSWER:
      some women do lose their hair. I've seen some older ladies that look pretty bald. But before you worry too much, maybe you should get checked by a doctor. I believe hair loss can be a symptom of an underactive thyroid. A simple blood test will check this.

  27. QUESTION:
    Why does my heart alternate between Normal and Bradycardia?
    Why please tell me why im 21 years old my heart somedays is very slow other days its 90bpm for a few hours then back to 70/80bpm somedays ill have panic attacks and it will go up to 140bpm.. then back to 60/70 but for some reason today my heart is very low and when it goes low i get alot of palpitations Ive already been to my doctor...had my heart checked is there a specific reason why i could be having bradycardia Even when moving around but it does go above 60bpm when moving when i stay still it skips and goes below 60bpm sometimes to the 40s! IM ONLY 21 years old and i am not in the best of shape is there a reason why it could be going this slow if they have done every test EKG ETT ECHO Blood work and can't find really anything wrong......How worried do i need to be about my brandycardia and when its this slow i get alot of palpitations ....

    • ANSWER:
      Sick sinus syndrome, also called sinus node dysfunction, is a group of abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) presumably caused by a malfunction of the sinus node, the heart's primary pacemaker. Bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome is a variant of sick sinus syndrome in which slow arrhythmias and fast arrhythmias alternate. In recent years, the syndrome has become increasingly prevalent in dogs. The reason why is unknown.
      Some drugs and an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) can cause natural pacemaker dysfunction.
      People with symptoms are usually given a permanent artificial pacemaker to accelerate the heart rate. If they also sometimes have a fast rate, they may also need drugs to slow the heart rate (such as a beta-blocker or a calcium channel blocker.
      Consult a cardiologist.

symptoms of underactive thyroid in dogs

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