Symptoms Of Hypothyroidism And Nausea

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and the fifth globally. Why so? Just how do doctors detect this disease and how's the life staging of individuals identified as having the same disease?

Introduction - Pancreas

The pancreas is an organ located in the abdomen. It takes on two important roles in our body (1)converting foods into fuel for the body's cells and (2)yet another is to regulate the blood sugar in the body.

Basic Anatomy

The pancreas is located behind the stomach together with other organs such as the small intestine and the liver.

Pancreatic cancer risk factor

Pancreatic cancer is said to be one kind of cancer which is difficult to diagnose. This is one of the major reasons why many organizations help offer information regarding this disease. Knowing the risk factors of the said disease can also help everyone to at least get rid of it.
Poor BMI - Regardless of what race, it's been observed that patients with poor bmi (overweight/obese) are commonly susceptible to having pancreatic cancer. Pancreatitis - It's a disease in the pancreas that can be acute or persistent. It's the sudden or severe inflammation of the pancreas which is also included in the risks. Diabetes - the moment a person is identified as having diabetes, numerous complications will almost certainly appear and pancreatic cancer is one of those. Family history - The genetic susceptibility of a person may also be a great risk to having pancreatic cancer. Studies show that 10% of pancreatic cancer patients developed their cancers due to genetic factors. Smoking - In different types of disease, cigarette smoking is a major risk factor. It is believed that 30% of pancreatic cancer patients developed their cancers due to cigarette smoking. This maybe one of the most preventable risks of having pancreatic cancer along with other types of cancer. Diet - Alternative cancer treatment centers think that pancreatic cancer cases occur because of poor diet. Foods rich in nitrates which includes processed meat and foods full of fats and calories causes the same. Being an African-American is additionally included - The only reason why African-Americans are high risk is due to the fact they have the poorest prognosis amongst all of the racial groups. They are rarely clinically diagnosed in advanced and therefore it is one of the reasons exactly why they are susceptible to most types of diseases.
Symptoms of Pancreatic cancer

Symptoms of pancreatic cancer usually do not appear easily because detection of the same is very difficult. Having said that, if you're experiencing these symptoms you might want to seek the aid of a cancer treatment center.
Yellowish skin and eyes Abdominal pain usually 3-4 hours after eating Unexplainable weight loss Vomiting Sudden appetite loss Itchy skin Diabetes Any changes in stool or urine color
Life expectancy

Since the detection of the disease is very difficult because the symptoms are very alike to other diseases, the life expectancy of a pancreatic cancer patient can be quite low. When someone is diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, usually the person's life expectancy will probably be about 5-8 months. Only 5% of pancreatic cancer patients survive their diseases in approximately a year. But again, the percentage may fall and rise based on the staging.

Cancer treatment centers can tell the life span of a pancreatic cancer patient is small, mainly because of the position of the pancreas itself. It's well hidden in the body and despite its size, no skilled expert can see or monitor the same since no apparatus can check the pancreas' condition.

A pancreatic cancer patient's life expectancy might be one of the more morbid and provides disappointing news too. But everyone must be aware of it and prevent the risk factors. Research and articles on the web have been in existence and all you've to do is to research and use the things you've learned from those. Again, prevention is preferable to cure. Take action now, before it's too late.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of high blood pressure and what can be done for it until you see a doctor?
    My daughter feet have started to swell, the first thing that came to mind is high blood pressure. She also is over weight. I have made her an appointment but the earliest she can be seen is 3 weeks at the doctors. Would anyone know the symptoms to look for and what can be done for it until she gets to see the doctor. She is 19 years old and is a smoker.

    • ANSWER:
      Hypertension
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_blood_pressure
      Signs and symptoms:
      Mild to moderate essential hypertension is usually asymptomatic.[15][16][17][18][19] Accelerated hypertension is associated with headache, somnolence, confusion, visual disturbances, and nausea and vomiting (hypertensive encephalopathy). Retinas are affected with narrowing of arterial diameter to less than 50% of venous diameter, copper or silver wire appearance, exudates, hemorrhages, or papilledema.[20] Some signs and symptoms are especially important in infants and neonates such as failure to thrive, seizure, irritability or lethargy, and respiratory distress.[21] While in children hypertension may cause headache, fatigue, blurred vision, epistaxis, and bell palsy.[21]

      Some signs and symptoms are especially important in suggesting a secondary medical cause of chronic hypertension, such as centripetal obesity, "buffalo hump," and/or wide purple abdominal striae and maybe a recent onset of diabetes suggest glucocorticoid excess either due to Cushing's syndrome or other causes. Hypertension due to other secondary endocrine diseases such as hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, or growth hormone excess show symptoms specific to these disease such as in hyperthyrodism there may be weight loss, tremor, tachycardia or atrial arrhythmia, palmar erythema and sweating.[22] Signs and symptoms associated with growth hormone excess such as coarsening of facial features, prognathism, macroglossia,[23] hypertrichosis, hyperpigmentation, and hyperhidrosis may occur in these patients.[24]:499. Other endocrine causes such as hyperaldosteronism may cause less specific symptoms such as numbness, polyuria, polydipsia, hypernatraemia, and metabolic alkalosis.[25] A systolic bruit heard over the abdomen or in the flanks suggests renal artery stenosis. Also radio femoral delay or diminished pulses in lower versus upper extremities suggests coarctation of the aorta. Hypertension in patients with pheochromocytomas is usually sustained but may be episodic. The typical attack lasts from minutes to hours and is associated with headache, anxiety, palpitation, profuse perspiration, pallor, tremor, and nausea and vomiting. Blood pressure is markedly elevated, and angina or acute pulmonary edema may occur. In primary aldosteronism, patients may have muscular weakness, polyuria, and nocturia due to hypokalemia. Chronic hypertension often leads to left ventricular hypertrophy, which can present with exertional and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. Cerebral involvement causes stroke due to thrombosis or hemorrhage from microaneurysms of small penetrating intracranial arteries. Hypertensive encephalopathy is probably caused by acute capillary congestion and exudation with cerebral edema, which is reversible.[20]
      Signs and symptoms associated with pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, can be proteinuria, edema, and hallmark of eclampsia which is convulsions, Other cerebral signs may precede the convulsion such as nausea, vomiting, headaches, and blindness.[26]

  2. QUESTION:
    What supplements/treatments do you recommend for hypothyroidism?
    I have been experiencing hair loss, excessive sweating, severe depression, severe intolerance of hot climates/surroundings, frequent nausea, and stomach pains since I was seventeen. The year before, I starved myself for a month in order to lose some weight. I have a very prevelent family history of thyroid disorder. I think, perhaps I triggered this with the shock to my metabolism that my anorexia caused. I have been eating regularly since I was 19, but the symptoms persist. What should I do? I am tired of being uncomfortable all of the time, and having thinning hair in parts because of my body's problem...I'm only 19! My libido is one eighth of what it used to be, and my cognitive abilities aren't what they once were...I did a bit of research and saw that all of my symptoms lined up with hypothyroidism, and I wish to know where to look or what to eat, or what I can do to change my body back...

    • ANSWER:
      Levothyroxine from your doctor though he will want to do a thyroid function (blood)test first to confirm.

      There are also herbal supplements available (ask in store) but as alternative not in addition to thyroxine I would go with prescribed thyroxine which although synthetic is similar to what you are missing and should rectify all the symptoms.

  3. QUESTION:
    When people are on kidney dialysis for kidney problems, can they get too much fluoride from their tap water?
    If so, what are the symptoms of fluoride overdose? Do doctors monitor fluoride levels in the blood at all?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, a person with healthy kidneys can only eliminate from the body 90% of the fluoride taken in from water, so someone with kidney problems will experience more fluoride retention and its associated health problems sooner and to a more severe degree.

      Fluoride causes excitotoxicity in the brain thus causing brain cell death. The nerve cells that connect the higher brain functions to the cortex are particularly susceptible with the result being that long term exposure to even low levels of fluoride is a chemical lobotomy. The victim will lose awareness. Initial symptoms are the same as Adult Attention Deficit Disorder. As the victim gets progressively worse, they become more like having Alzheimer's Disease. The fluoride molecule is often attached to aluminum and can trick the blood/brain barrier into letting it pass, thus being the cause of aluminum contamination in the brain. Aluminum has been suggested as the cause of Alzheimer's. (Much of the fluoride that is added to the water comes from the waste of aluminum manufacturing process and would need to be disposed of as toxic waste if it wasn't sold to the government to be added to the water.)
      http://www.fluorideresearch.org/374/files/374301-314.pdf

      ( http://www.fluoridedebate.com )

      Thorazine is one of many drugs that has fluoride as a main ingredient.
      http://www.sntp.net/drugs/thorazine.htm

      Another health problem associated with fluoride is with the thyroid. Fluoride is an iodine antagonist, so it usurps the iodine from the thyroid causing all the symptoms of iodine deficiency even when you are getting enough iodine in the diet. When the thyroid is iodine deficient it can act erratic. It usually gives the symptoms of hypothyroidism but can also erratically give the symptoms of hyperthyroidism. This can cause the symptoms of clinical Depression and Anxiety.
      So it's likely that fluoride is actually the cause of the epidemic of Depression and Anxiety that we are having in the U.S. Most anti-depressants which have fluoride as an ingredient or as an element in the active ingredient's molecular compound, have a warning that states that taking the antidepressant when not actually suffering from clinical Depression can cause Depression.

      The following is from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluoride_toxicity
      "Poisoning comes from ingesting a large amount of fluoride in a short period of time. Ingesting 3–5 mg/kg may cause symptoms to appear, while the estimated lethal dose is 5–10 g (32–64 mg/kg) in adults and 16 mg/kg in children.[8] Severity of symptoms depends upon the amount of fluoride ingested. These include abdominal pain, diarrhea, dysphagia, hypersalivation, mucosal injury, nausea, vomiting. Electrolyte abnormalities including hyperkalemia, hypocalcemia, hypoglycemia, and hypomagnesemia may occur. Neurological symptoms include headache, muscle weakness, hyperactive reflexes, muscular spasms, paresthesia seizures, tetanic contractions, and tremors. In severe cases, multi-organ failure will occur. Death typically results from cardiac arrest, shock, widening of QRS, and various arrhythmias occur.[8]"

      As we can tell from the first sentence, there is a concerted effort to make fluoride in the water seem innocuous. The very people that are telling us that fluoride in the water is a good idea are the same people that once advertised that one brand of cigarettes was good for sore throats. People in white coats perhaps have the ulterior motive of wanting to keep you ill so that they can get more of your business in the form of regular visits. Western medicine as a whole tends to treat only the symptoms without attempting to remove the cause. Doctors know, for example, that cancer thrives on milk protein while normal adult cells do just as well with plant protein which cancerous cells cannot use. Yet they prescribe milk protein weight gain drinks for cancer patients taking chemotherapy. Refer to the book "The China Study." Furthermore, the cause of death will not be reported as fluoride poisoning, but instead will be reported as " cardiac arrest, shock, widening of QRS, [or] various arrhythmias " It may be that the doctor or dentist is merely following what was taught and doesn't know any better. In that case, it is up to you to recognize what your doctor, though his intentions are honest, does not. Fluoride, even in small doses, is detrimental to everyone's health.

      My sources reveal that fluoride may increase the likelihood of getting diabetes and high blood pressure.
      http://www.naturalnews.com/fluoride.html

  4. QUESTION:
    What does it mean if I have been nauseated for the past 2 days with no other symptoms?
    I am a 21 year old female with both IBS and Hypothyroidism - I don't feel like the current nausea is related to IBS. Could this be a virus? If so, will it get worse or better from here?
    I am not pregnant.

    • ANSWER:
      First of all do a pregnancy test if there is a chance at all you might be pregnant. If you're not then see your doctor.

  5. QUESTION:
    Can anyone who is suffering from a thyroid condition tell me what their symptoms were before being diagnosed?
    I have been so ill with symptoms such as burning skin, nausea ,and numb toes and I'm being tested for thyroid problems

    • ANSWER:
      i'm 23 and i've had thyroid problems since 2007. a
      first i had hyperthyroidism. my symptoms were:
      -sweating
      -rapid heart beat (170 while at rest)
      -weight loss (25 pounds)
      -diarrhea
      -nervousness
      -nausea after taking two bites of food
      -hair loss
      -shaking
      i was put on a beta blocker to lower my heart rate and my thyroid levels went back to normal with in a couple months so nothing had to be done about my thyroid.

      here is a great link to learn about hyperthyroidism:
      http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/hyperthyroidism-topic-overview

      i was then fine for quite some time.

      then a few months ago i started having symptoms of hypothyroidism so i went to my dr and had blood tests and an ultrasound done and it was recently determined i have hypothyroidism and just last week i started taking thyroid medication.
      my symptoms are:
      -always cold
      -always tired
      -muscle aches
      -head aches
      -dry itchy scalp/skin
      -lack of concentration
      -slight constipation
      -trouble losing weight even with diet and exercise
      -weak nails
      -hair loss
      -feeling extremely hungry, getting full really quick, and then being hungry again right after.
      here is a great link to learn about hypothyroidism:
      http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/hypothyroidism-topic-overview

  6. QUESTION:
    sicknesses with symptoms of cold hands and hot foreheads?
    I am writing a story that i would actually really like to make into a book someday. One of the main characters falls sick. Her symptoms are cold hands and feet, hot forehead, nausea, unresponsiveness, and very heavy sleep.
    And if my 'book' ever does get published, i will make sure to put the winning answer's name either in my book somewhere or i will thank you at the beginning or back of the book or both.

    • ANSWER:
      Ha ha... That sounds challenging.
      The best diagnosis I can give you is myxedema.

      Medline Plus of the National Institutes of Health says myxedema is the most serious complication associated with untreated hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid gland). Myxedema is a condition that can result in a coma and death. Signs and symptoms of myxedema include severe cold intolerance and drowsiness, which lead to profound lethargy and unconsciousness.

      Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/171550-hypothyroid-danger-symptoms/#ixzz2O0joihtg

      And good luck with publishing your book.

  7. QUESTION:
    What would cause the stomach to not dump food into the intestines?
    My son is in the hospital. They have given him tests which show that whatever he takes in stays in his stomach until he has to throw it up because it will not pass into the intestines. Is it a blockage or what?

    • ANSWER:
      Your son may have gastroparesis. Gastroparesis (delayed gastric emptying) is a disorder where the stomach takes too long to empty its contents. The vagus nerve controls the movement of food from the stomach through the digestive tract so when gastroparesis occurs the vagus nerve is damaged and the muscles of the stomach and intestines don't work properly. This causes food to move slowly or stop moving in the digestive tract. There are quite a few causes from hypothyroidism to a viral illness. Please check the links to read more information.

      Symptoms of gastroparesis are:

      *Heartburn
      *Pain in the upper abdomen
      *Nausea
      *Vomiting of undigested food—sometimes several hours after a meal
      *Early feeling of fullness after only a few bites of food
      *Weight loss due to poor absorption of nutrients or low calorie intake
      *Abdominal bloating
      *High and low blood glucose levels
      *Lack of appetite
      *Gastroesophageal reflux
      *Spasms in the stomach area

      Gastroparesis:
      http://www.puristat.com/stomach/gastroparesis.aspx

      Causes of gastroparesis:
      http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/g/gastroparesis/causes.htm

  8. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of underactive and over active thyroid?

    • ANSWER:
      Early symptoms of hypothyroidism:--
      * Hard stools or constipation
      * Increased sensitivity to cold
      * Fatigue or feeling slowed down
      * Heavier menstrual periods
      * Joint or muscle pain
      * Paleness or dry skin
      * Sadness or depression
      * Thin, brittle hair or fingernails
      * Weakness
      * Weight gain without trying
      Late symptoms, if left untreated:--
      * Decreased taste and smell
      * Hoarseness
      * Puffy face, hands, and feet
      * Slow speech
      * Thickening of the skin
      * Thinning of eyebrows

      Symptoms of hyperthyroidism:--
      * Difficulty concentrating
      * Fatigue
      * Frequent bowel movements
      * Goiter (visibly enlarged thyroid gland) or thyroid nodules
      * Heat intolerance
      * Increased appetite
      * Increased sweating
      * Irregular menstrual periods in women
      * Nervousness
      * Restlessness
      * Weight loss (rarely, weight gain)
      Other symptoms that can occur with this disease:--
      * Breast development in men
      * Clammy skin
      * Diarrhea
      * Hair loss
      * Hand tremor
      * High blood pressure
      * Itching - overall
      * Lack of menstrual periods in women
      * Nausea and vomiting
      * Pounding, rapid, or irregular pulse
      * Protruding eyes (exophthalmos)
      * Rapid, forceful, or irregular heartbeat (palpitations)
      * Skin blushing or flushing
      * Sleeping difficulty
      * Weakness

  9. QUESTION:
    What are the immediate effects of large amounts of radiation?
    I'm currently busy writing a story on a website that promotes fiction, and it takes place in a nuclear wasteland. I've been trying to find out what would happen if someone were to wind up somewhere where there are large amounts of radiation present, but all I can get are the long term effects of the different rem levels. What I'm looking for are the immediate effects of a very large amount of radiation - can anyone help me? I'm looking for effects like what happens to the skin, and the body, and all that before the typical "death in less than a minute" answer. I know appearing right where a nuke fell means death pretty much instantly - but I'm looking for what happens when you end up near the radius of the bomb itself, for example.

    • ANSWER:
      The most likely route of exposure would be inhaling or ingesting dust that had been contaminated with fallout. That tends to be a much bigger danger than whole-body exposure from incident radiation. That's why radiation cleanup workers wear respirators.

      In the case of inhalation, this would probably produce symptoms similar to a severe, long lasting lung infection. Coughing up blood, flu-like symptoms, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea. About a week or two afterwards the hair would start to fall out. Death would occur soon after that from shock, anemia, and multiple organ failure. From exceptionally high radiation doses there tends to be both severe, persistent headache, dizziness, confusion, and mental decline, leading to rapid incapacitation.

      Victims may (or may not) display a sunburn-like reddening of the skin a few hours after exposure, but this happens over the whole body and clothing does not affect it. Blistering is also possible.

      High doses of radiation rarely kill outright. However it destroys the bone marrow and lining of the intestine and stomach. This tends to cause life threatening infections as a side effect. Without bone marrow the body can no longer produce enough immune cells to fight infections. White blood cells themselves are highly radiation resistant, so this kind of thing only happens several weeks later.

      Note that areas that were radioactive enough that there was immediate danger would probably be obvious since trees and shrubs would be yellowed and severely stunted, or dead, surrounded by bare soil.

      See this interesting article on the "Red Forest" near the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant. It shows the effects of nuclear fallout on the landscape. http://chornobyl.in.ua/en/red-forest-in-chernobyl-zone.html

      Something that needs to be asked, how long after a nuclear war are you talking about? A few months? Two or three years, or several decades?

      The danger is a lot higher immediately after a nuclear blast or nuclear accident, due to iodine-131 which is a fission product. Radioactive iodine destroys the thyroid gland:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypothyroidism#Late

      However I-131 has a half-life of 8 days so it disappears effectively after a month and a half.

      After several decades most of the dangerous fission products tend to decay except cesium-137 and strontium-90. These are a hazard because they tend to concentrate in plant and animal tissues by a factor of 100x or more. You might be in an are that was not especially dangerous by itself, but eating plants in the area could cause symptoms of chronic exposure. Not likely to be fatal because clearly the amount of Cs-137 in the plant was not enough to kill it either.

      There are three types of nuclear radiation. Alpha, beta, and gamma. Alpha and beta can't penetratre the skin, however they are extremely dangerous if aplha/beta emitting isotopes enter the bloodstream, alpha-emitters especially. Gamma has the most penetrating power but also has the lower overall effect on the body.

  10. QUESTION:
    How to treat and what is Hyperthyroidism?
    .I was wondering what can happen if I don't get this treated? I've had it for a long time. It runs in my family.
    My conditions are that I never gain weight, I eat all the time, my heart beats faster when I'm sitting down. I'm also underweight.
    Are there anyone out there that has this treated or have this? What can I do to get it treated?
    Also what is it?
    Thanks for all you answers.

    • ANSWER:
      Definition

      Hyperthyroidism is a condition caused by an overactive thyroid gland. The gland makes too much T4 and T3 hormones. Hormones are substances that affect and control many important functions in the body.

      Alternative Names
      Thyrotoxicosis; Overactive thyroid

      Causes, incidence, and risk factors

      The thyroid gland is located in the neck. It produces several hormones which control the way that every cell in the body uses energy (metabolism). The thyroid is part of the endocrine system.

      Hyperthyroidism or thyrotoxicosis occurs when the thyroid releases too many of its hormones over a short (acute) or long (chronic) period of time. Many diseases and conditions can cause this problem, including:

      Graves disease
      Non-cancerous growths of the thyroid gland or pituitary gland
      Tumors of the testes or ovaries
      Inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the thyroid due to viral infections or other causes
      Ingestion (taking in through the mouth, such as in eating) of large amounts of thyroid hormone
      Ingestion of excessive iodineGraves disease accounts for 85% of all cases of hyperthyroidism.

      Related topics:

      Painless (silent thyroiditis
      Factitious hyperthyroidism
      Hypothyroidism
      Graves disease

      Symptoms

      Weight loss
      Increased appetite
      Nervousness
      Restlessness
      Heat intolerance
      Increased sweating
      Fatigue
      Frequent bowel movements
      Menstrual irregularities in women
      Goiter (visibly enlarged thyroid) may be present
      Additional symptoms that may be associated with this disease:
      Weakness
      Sleeping difficulty
      Clammy skin
      Skin blushing or flushing
      Bounding pulse
      Nausea and vomiting
      Lack of menstruation
      Itching - overall
      Heartbeat sensations
      Hand tremor
      Hair loss
      Diarrhea
      Breast development in men
      High blood pressure
      Protruding eyes (exophthalmos)

      Signs and tests

      Physical examination may reveal thyroid enlargement or goiter. Vital signs (temperature, pulse, rate of breathing, blood pressure) show increased heart rate. Systolic blood pressure (the first number in a blood pressure reading) may be high.

      Laboratory tests that evaluate thyroid function:

      Serum TSH is usually low
      T3 and free T4 are usually high
      This disease may also alter the results of the following tests:
      Vitamin B-12
      TSI
      Triglycerides
      RT3U
      Radioactive iodine uptake
      Glucose test
      Cholesterol test
      Antithyroglobulin antibody

      Treatment

      Treatment varies depending on the cause of the condition and the severity of symptoms. Hyperthyroidism is usually treated with antithyroid medications, radioactive iodine (which destroys the thyroid and stops the excess production of hormones), or surgery to remove the thyroid.

      If the thyroid must be removed with radiation or surgery, replacement thyroid hormones must be taken for the rest of the person's life.

      Beta-blockers like propranolol are used to treat some of the symptoms including rapid heart rate, sweating, and anxiety until the hyperthyroidism can be controlled.

      Expectations (prognosis)

      Hyperthyroidism caused by Graves disease is usually progressive and has many associated complications, some of which are severe and affect quality of life.

      These include complications caused by treatment such as use of radioactive iodine, surgery, and medications to replace thyroid hormones. However, hyperthyroidism is generally treatable and rarely fatal.

      Complications

      Heart-related complications include rapid heart rate, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation.

      Thyroid crisis or storm is an acute worsening of the symptoms of hyperthyroidism that may occur with infection or stress. Fever, decreased mental alertness, and abdominal pain may occur, and immediate hospitalization is needed.

      Hyperthyroidism increases the risk for osteoporosis.
      There may be complications related to surgery, including visible scarring of the neck, hoarseness due to nerve damage to the voice box, and a low calcium level because of damage to the parathyroid glands.

      Complications may be related to replacement of thyroid hormones. If too little hormone is given, symptoms of under-active thyroid can occur including fatigue, increased cholesterol levels, mild weight gain, depression, and slowing of mental and physical activity. If too much hormone is given, the symptoms of hyperthyroidism will come back.

      Calling your health care provider

      Call your health care provider if you have symptoms which could be caused by excessive thyroid hormone production. If the symptoms are associated with a rapid, irregular heartbeat, dizziness, or change in consciousness, go to the emergency room or call the local emergency number (such as 911).

      Call your health care provider if treatment for hyperthyroidism induces symptoms of under-active thyroid, including mental and physical sluggishness, weight gain, and depression.

      Prevention

      There are no general prevention measures to prevent hyperthyroidism.

  11. QUESTION:
    How much Levothryoxine do u take for hypothyroidism?
    I am taking 100mg but my doctor may change it if my blood tests are still wrong...I started with 50mg, how much can it still increase????

    • ANSWER:
      Dosages vary according to the age groups and the individual condition of the patient, body weight and compliance to the medication and diet. Maximum dosage may reach 400 µg per day but that is rare. Monitoring of the patient's condition and adjustment of the dosage is periodical and necessary
      Patients prescribed too high of a dose of levothyroxine may experience effects which mimic hyperthyroidism. Overdose can result in heart palpitations, abdominal pain, nausea, anxiousness, confusion, agitation, insomnia, weight loss, and increased appetite. Allergic reactions to the drug are characterized by symptoms such as difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, or swelling of the face and tongue. Acute overdose may cause fever, hypoglycemia, heart failure, coma and unrecognized adrenal insufficiency.ope this helped you

      .

  12. QUESTION:
    Why does my stomach hurt after eating a lot of candy?
    I just ate a whole bag of twizzlers and now it hurts. I've had large amounts of candy before and haven't gotten stomach aches from it. I'm out to dinner and don't want to throw up when eating. I'm drinking some water right now hoping it'll help. What should I do?

    • ANSWER:
      any candies contain milk derivatives, such as cookies, donuts, smoothies, ice cream, coffee cream, chocolates, etc, this may be the reason that causes stomach hurts after eating sweets.

      Lactose intolerance is a condition of the intestinal microvilli due to the body produces little or no amount of the enzyme lactase, which results in an inability to metabolize lactose (“milk sugar”).

      Thus, when the absence of lactase prevents the body digest lactose produces clinical representative as a manifestation of this inability to adequately respond to their presence in the digestive tract.
      Symptoms are 30 minutes after eating:

      -Diarrhea
      -Nausea
      -Vomiting
      -Stomach cramps

      -Stomach hurts after eating.

      Constipation

      A diet rich in refined sugars can cause several health problems like constipation.

      Constipation is a digestive problem increasingly common today, is the lack of mobility of the intestines, causing rare and painful defecation, with much difficulty and expulsing hard stools.

      Constipation may cause your stomach hurts after eating or few hours later due to inflamation of the intestines and low mobility of the intestines

      The causes of constipation are:
      Lack of exercise
      Not drinking enough water
      Diet low in fiber
      stress
      pregnancy
      Taking medications
      hypothyroidism
      Colon Cancer
      Irritable Bowel Syndrome
      Other intestinal diseases

  13. QUESTION:
    Why do I get very sleepy in the afternoons?
    I eat a light lunch, get a good night sleep and I am not anemic, yet, around 2 pm my eyes just close and I feel like I have not slept for days. What could be wrong and what can I do?

    • ANSWER:
      maybe you got hypothyroidism/hyperthryoidism-i forget

      i was recently diagnosed with hyper.

      "Major clinical signs include weight loss (often accompanied by an increased appetite), anxiety, intolerance to heat, hair loss, muscle aches, weakness, fatigue, hyperactivity, irritability, hypoglycemia, apathy, tremor, , and sweating. In addition, patients may present with a variety of symptoms such as ,shortness of breath (dyspnea), loss of libido, amenorrhea, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, gynaecomastia and feminization.[4] Long term untreated hyperthyroidism can lead to osteoporosis. These classical symptoms may not be present often in the elderly.[citation needed]"

      in addition i dont think it mentions there but hyper also causes you to feel the need to poop more often -____-

  14. QUESTION:
    What causes stiffness and tightness in the entire upper abdomen upto the ribs?can this lead to breathlessness?
    Also, I had my cardio tests plus a chest x ray and entire abdominal sonography in the month of October, all results were normal, still I have chest pains, stiffness and tightness.
    I have a constant fear of having a heart attack or a severe problem related to my lungs. I have developed this fear for almost 4 months.

    Should I repeat all the tests again??

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Abdominal Muscle Spasms
      Overworked muscles: Unfamiliar exercise or frequent strenuous activity can cause the abdominal muscles to spasm. This happens because the muscle is being overused, resulting in the muscle's energy loss . This loss of energy causes it to contract suddenly, resulting in muscle spasms. This contraction of the muscle may involve the muscle in totality or only a specific part of it. People who are more at risk of developing muscle spasms due to this reason are athletes, an individual who exercises frequently or has just started exercising, or someone in an occupation that requires vigorous exertion such as construction workers. The exercise that will most likely cause abdominal muscle spasms to manifest is crunches or sit-ups. A muscle can also become overworked with normal daily activities such as shoveling snow, mowing the lawn, or raking grass.

      Dehydration: If the muscles are depleted in water and electrolytes, muscle spasms can occur. This is because proteins in the muscles require a certain amount of water, glucose, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. When these substances are low, their normal function becomes abnormal, which sometimes results in abdominal muscle spasms.

      Kidney Stones: This is an abnormal mass that is present in either the kidneys or urinary tract. This mass is comprised of hard crystalline mineral material. There are a number of factors that contribute to the formation of a kidney stone. These include a decrease in urine volume, excess in a specific substance in the urine, and dehydration. Kidney stones can cause severe pain in the abdomen, back, or groin. This sporadic pain may feel like cramps or muscle spasms. This means the severity of the pain will change frequently, being mild at one instance while unbearable at the next. Other accompanying symptoms include nausea, vomiting, blood in the urine, difficulties urinating, penile pain, and testicular pain.

      Black widow spider bite: A bite from this highly venomous spider can cause abdominal muscle spasms. The first sign of a bite will be the actual bite itself. Given the severe pain induced by this bite, you will be aware of its presence. The other symptoms will manifest in 20-60 minutes after the bite has occurred. The spider's venom affects the victim's nervous system, which results in severe muscle cramps or spasms in the abdomen, shoulder, or back. Nausea, vomiting, chest pain, dizziness, fainting, and weakness sometimes follow. The severity of the spider bite reaction is dependent upon the victim's age and health. Children and the elderly are more at risk of developing a severe reaction to the spider's venom.

      Hypothyroidism: The thyroid is a gland located in the neck that has the function of regulating metabolism hormones. Hypothyroidism is an underactive thyroid that is not producing enough hormones. Muscle spasms, aches, and tenderness are symptomatic of this medical condition. Other symptoms include fatigue, constipation, sensitivity to the cold, pale skin, hoarse voice, weight gain, brittle nails, and depression. If abdominal muscle spasms coincide with any of these symptoms, then you may have hypothyroidism.

      Other more rare causes of abdominal muscle spasms are diverticulitis, intussusception, hernia, cholecystitis, and bowel obstruction.
      good luck and God bless you

  15. QUESTION:
    What are the negative effects of artificial sweeteners?
    we know the good effects it helps people take less sugars but what are the negative effects?

    • ANSWER:
      For many people it causes them to intake more sugar on a daily basis. there are NO good effects. This is due to the fact that it causes one to crave sugar. Many people who are diabetic are told to consume artificial sweeteners. In fact it does more harm than good. I have family member that had a grand mal seizure due to drinking a diet drink after it was sitting in a hot car for several hours. They ended up with high levels of Formaldehyde in their body. Artificial are not stable as they age or in heat... it will break down in poison. Ever have an expired diet drink?

      According to the FDA. All this info is public record and available for all to see. the following are recorded and verified affects of aspartame:
      Psychological/Psychiatric – severe depression, irritability, aggression, anxiety, personality changes, insomnia, phobias.

      •Gastrointestinal – nausea, diarrhea (sometimes with blood in stools), abdominal pain, pain when swallowing.

      •Skin and Allergies – itching without a rash, lip and mouth reactions, hives, aggravated respiratory allergies such as asthma.

      •Chest – palpitations, tachycardia, shortness of breath, recent high blood pressure.

      •Neurologic – epileptic seizures, headaches, migraines and (some severe) dizziness, unsteadiness, confusion, memory loss, severe drowsiness and sleepiness, paresthesia or numbness of the limbs, severe slurring of speech, severe hyperactivity and restless legs, atypical facial pain, severe tremors.

      •Eyes – blindness in one or both eyes, decreased vision and/or other eye problems such as blurring, bright flashes, squiggly lines, tunnel vision, decreased night vision, pain in one or both eyes, decreased tears, trouble with contact lenses, bulging eyes.

      •Ear – tinnitus, ringing or buzzing sound, severe intolerance of noise, marked hearing impairment.

      •Endocrine and Metabolic – loss of control of diabetes, menstrual changes, marked thinning or loss of hair, marked weight loss, gradual weight gain, aggravated low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), severe PMS.

      •Other symptoms – frequency of voiding and burning during urination, excessive thirst, fluid retention, leg swelling and bloating.
      Aspartame may trigger, mimic, or cause the following illnesses: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Epstein-Barr, Post-Polio Syndrome, Lyme Disease, Grave’s Disease, Meniere’s Disease, ALS, Epilepsy, Multiple Sclerosis (MS), EMS, Hypothyroidism Fibromyalgia, Lupus, non-Hodgkin’s, Lymphoma, Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD).

      The FDA has documented 92 symptoms of Aspartame. This includes coma and death.

  16. QUESTION:
    Is it normal for menopause symptoms to increase immediately when periods stop?

    • ANSWER:
      35 Possible Symptoms Of Premenopause

      1. Hot flashes, flushes, night sweats and/or cold flashes, clammy feeling
      2. Bouts of rapid heart beat
      3. Irritability
      4. Mood swings, sudden tears
      5. Trouble sleeping through the night (with or without night sweats)
      6. Irregular periods; shorter, lighter periods; heavier periods, flooding; phantom periods, shorter cycles, longer cycles
      7. Loss of libido (see note)
      8. Dry vagina, a general drying out that can include eyes, mouth, joints and skin. (see note)
      9. Crashing fatigue
      10. Anxiety, feeling ill at ease
      11. Feelings of dread, apprehension, doom (see note)
      12. Difficulty concentrating, disorientation, mental confusion
      13. Disturbing memory lapses
      14. Incontinence, especially upon sneezing, laughing; urge incontinence (see note)
      15. Itchy, crawly skin (see note)
      16. Aching, sore joints, muscles and tendons (see note)
      17. Increased tension in muscles
      18. Breast tenderness
      19. Headache change: increase or decrease
      20. Gastrointestinal distress, indigestion, flatulence, gas pain, nausea
      21. Sudden bouts of bloat
      22. Depression (see note)
      23. Exacerbation of existing conditions
      24. Increase in allergies
      25. Weight gain (see note)
      26. Hair loss or thinning, head, pubic, or whole body; increase in facial hair
      27. Dizziness, light-headedness, episodes of loss of balance
      28. Changes in body odor
      29. Electric shock sensation under the skin and in the head (see note)
      30. Tingling in the extremities, (see note)
      31. Gum problems, increased bleeding
      32. Burning tongue, burning roof of mouth, bad taste in mouth, dry mouth, change in breath odor
      33. Osteoporosis (after several years)
      34. Changes in fingernails: softer, crack or break easier
      35. Tinnitus: ringing in ears, bells, 'whooshing' buzzing etc.

      NOTES:
      Symptom 1 (hot flashes)
      Hot flashes are due to the hypothalamic response to declining ovarian estrogen production. The declining estrogen state induces hypophysiotropic neurons in the arcuate nucleas of the hypothalamus to release gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in a pulsatile fashion, which in turn stimulates release of luteinizing hormone (LH). Extremely high pulses of LH occur during the period of declining estrogen production. The LH has vasodilatory effects, which leads to flushing.

      Symptom 7 (loss of libido)
      For some women the loss is so great that they actually find sex repulsive, in much the same way as they felt before puberty. What hormones give, loss of hormones can take away.

      Symptom 8 (dry vagina)
      results in painful intercourse

      Symptom 11 (doom thoughts)
      includes thoughts of death, picturing one's own death

      Symptom 14 (incontinence)
      reflects a general loss of smooth muscle tone

      Symptom 15 (itchy, crawly skin)
      feeling of ants crawling under the skin, not just dry itchy skin

      Symptom 16 (aching sore joints)
      may include such problems as carpal tunnel syndrome

      Symptom 22 (depression)
      different from other depression, the inability to cope is overwhelming. There is a feeling of loss of self. Hormone therapy ameliorates the depression dramatically.

      Symptom 25 (weight gain)
      often around the waist and thighs, resulting in the disappearing waistline

      Symptom 29 (shock sensation)
      "the feeling of a rubber band snapping in the layer of tissue between skin and muscle. It is a precursor to a hot flash"

      Symptom 30 (tingling in extremities)
      can also be a symptom of B-12 deficiency, diabetes, alterations in the flexibility of blood vessels, or a depletion of potassium or calcium

      Some of the 34 signs may also be symptoms of one of the following:
      * hypothyroidism
      * diabetes
      * depression with another etiology
      * Multiple Sclerosis
      * other medical conditions
      If you have reason to believe you may have one of these conditions, please see your doctor for treatment.
      Need more info?
      E-mail me!
      Blessings~
      Michelle Jones

  17. QUESTION:
    Can hypothyroid cause back pain, headaches or frequent nausea?
    My doctor is checking me out for low thyroid, and I'm just wondering if anybody who has experienced it can tell me.

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of Hypothyroidism

      Fatigue
      Weakness
      Weight gain or increased difficulty losing weight
      Coarse, dry hair
      Dry, rough pale skin
      Hair loss
      Cold intolerance (can't tolerate the cold like those around you)
      Muscle cramps and frequent muscle aches
      Constipation
      Depression
      Irritability
      Memory loss
      Abnormal menstrual cycles
      Decreased libido

      I have been diagnosed with it, it is more common than you might think. You could have it. It is treatable which will make your symptoms improve but just so you know they all don't go away, some just get easier to deal with. And you may not have every symptom but you could get them in the future. You will need regular blood tests to see what your levels are especially if you are put on any type of medication. That way the doctor knows if your dosage is correct.

  18. QUESTION:
    How do you know if your stomach is Paralyzed? What are the signs and the symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      "A paralyzed stomach is called gastroparesis and has several possible causes but usually is a complication of diabetes. But diabetes is not the only cause of gastroparesis. Other possible culprits include the following:

      postviral syndromes
      anorexia nervosa
      surgery on the stomach or vagus nerve
      medications that slow contractions in the intestine, particularly anticholinergics and narcotics
      smooth muscle disorders, such as amyloidosis and scleroderma
      nervous system diseases, including abdominal migraine and Parkinson’s disease
      metabolic disorders, including hypothyroidism

      What Are the Symptoms? The symptoms of gastroparesis include a feeling of fullness early after a meal, bloating, heartburn, upset stomach, nausea, and vomiting. These symptoms may be constant or may flare up from time to time with periods of relief in between."

      Hope this helps. Good luck.

  19. QUESTION:
    My friend says she keeps fainting and her hair is falling out?
    I think it may be stress. I told her that she should go see a doctor. She says she will. But does anyone know what may be the problem. She is 17 by the way
    I dont think she has an eating disorder. she is definetly not anorexic or bulemic.

    • ANSWER:
      heat, heart problems, meds, stress, hypothyroidism,
      Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)
      does she have any mood swings?

      Early symptoms of PCOS include:

      * Few or no menstrualAbnormal menstrual periods
      Breast - premenstrual tenderness and swelling
      Depression and the menstrual cycle
      Menstrual cramp relief
      Menstrual periods - heavy, prolonged, or irregular
      Painful menstrual periods
      Premenstrual bloating
      Premenstrual dysphoric disorder
      Premenstrual syndrome
      Relief of menstrual cramps
      Vaginal bleeding between periods periods.

      * Heavy, irregular vaginalAnterior vaginal wall repair
      Causes of vaginal itching
      Culture - endocervix
      Hydrocele
      Hysterectomy
      Transvaginal ultrasound
      Vaginal bleeding between periods
      Vaginal cysts
      Vaginal discharge bleedingBleeding
      Bleeding between periods
      Bleeding disorders
      Bleeding gums
      Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (dub)
      Ear discharge
      Gastrointestinal bleeding
      Hemorrhagic stroke
      Nosebleed

      * HairHair loss
      Hair transplant
      Folliculitis, decalvans on the scalp
      Head louse infestation - scalp
      Ringworm of the scalp
      Tinea capitis
      Wood's lamp test - of the scalp and hairHair loss
      Hair transplant
      Male pattern baldness growth (hirsutism) on the faceFace pain, chestAcne, cystic on the chest
      Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray
      Bronchial cancer - chest x-ray
      Chest mri
      Chest pain
      Chest tomogram
      Chest tube insertion
      Chest tube insertion - series, backBack pain - low
      Back strain treatment, stomachAbdominal pain
      Abdominal pain diagnosis
      Esophagus and stomach anatomy
      Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy
      Gastric cancer
      Gastric suction
      Gastric ulcer
      Ileus - x-ray of distended bowel and stomach
      Nausea and vomiting
      Roux-en-y stomach surgery for weight loss
      Stomach, thumbs, or toes. More than 70% of women with PCOS complain of these hairHair loss
      Hair transplant

      * AcneAcne
      Acne - close-up of pustular lesions
      Acne on the back
      Acne, cystic on the chest
      Acne, cystic on the face
      Multiple basal cell cancer due to x-ray therapy for acne and oily skinActinic keratosis
      Aging changes in skin
      Allergy skin prick or scratch test
      Allergy testing
      Basal cell carcinoma
      Birthmarks - red
      Cellulitis
      Circumcision
      Cutaneous skin tags
      Dry skin
      Fair skin cancer risks, caused by high androgen levels.

      * DepressionAdolescent depression
      Bipolar disorder
      Depression
      Depression - resources
      Depression among the elderly
      Depression and heart disease
      Depression and insomnia
      Depression and the menstrual cycle
      Depression in children or mood swings. Hormonal changes are a known cause of emotional symptoms.

      http://www.webmd.com/hw/womens_conditions/tw9106.asp

  20. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know anything about aspartame/methane alcohol poisoning?
    I am absolutely addicted to Diet Coke. I also have been suffering from some horrible arthritis-like symptoms for about the past four years. Have any of you noticed a link between aspartame and arthritis? Obviously, I'm going to try abstaining from products containing artificial sweeteners to see if that helps, but I'm curious to know if anyone knows anything.

    • ANSWER:
      The components of aspartame can lead to a number of health problems, as you have read. Side effects can occur gradually, can be immediate, or can be acute reactions. According to Lendon Smith, M.D. there is an enormous population suffering from side effects associated with aspartame, yet have no idea why drugs, supplements and herbs don’t relieve their symptoms. Then, there are users who don’t ‘appear’ to suffer immediate reactions at all. Even these individuals are susceptible to the long-term damage caused by excitatory amino acids, phenylalanine, methanol, and DKP.

      Adverse reactions and side effects of aspartame include:

      Eye
      blindness in one or both eyes
      decreased vision and/or other eye problems such as: blurring, bright flashes, squiggly lines, tunnel vision, decreased night vision
      pain in one or both eyes
      decreased tears
      trouble with contact lenses
      bulging eyes

      Ear
      tinnitus - ringing or buzzing sound
      severe intolerance of noise
      marked hearing impairment

      Neurologic
      epileptic seizures
      headaches, migraines and (some severe)
      dizziness, unsteadiness, both
      confusion, memory loss, both
      severe drowsiness and sleepiness
      paresthesia or numbness of the limbs
      severe slurring of speech
      severe hyperactivity and restless legs
      atypical facial pain
      severe tremors

      Psychological/Psychiatric
      severe depression
      irritability
      aggression
      anxiety
      personality changes
      insomnia
      phobias

      Chest
      palpitations, tachycardia
      shortness of breath
      recent high blood pressure

      Gastrointestinal
      nausea
      diarrhea, sometimes with blood in stools
      abdominal pain
      pain when swallowing

      Skin and Allergies
      itching without a rash
      lip and mouth reactions
      hives
      aggravated respiratory allergies such as asthma

      Endocrine and Metabolic
      loss of control of diabetes
      menstrual changes
      marked thinning or loss of hair
      marked weight loss
      gradual weight gain
      aggravated low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
      severe PMS

      Other
      frequency of voiding and burning during urination
      excessive thirst, fluid retention, leg swelling, and bloating
      increased susceptibility to infection

      Additional Symptoms of Aspartame Toxicity include the most critical symptoms of all
      death
      irreversible brain damage
      birth defects, including mental retardation
      peptic ulcers
      aspartame addiction and increased craving for sweets
      hyperactivity in children
      severe depression
      aggressive behavior
      suicidal tendencies

      Aspartame may trigger, mimic, or cause the following illnesses:
      Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
      Epstein-Barr
      Post-Polio Syndrome
      Lyme Disease
      Grave’s Disease
      Meniere’s Disease
      Alzheimer’s Disease
      ALS
      Epilepsy
      Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
      EMS
      Hypothyroidism
      Mercury sensitivity from Amalgam fillings
      Fibromyalgia
      Lupus
      non-Hodgkins
      Lymphoma
      Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)

      These are not allergies or sensitivities, but diseases and disease syndromes. Aspartame poisoning is commonly misdiagnosed because aspartame symptoms mock textbook ‘disease’ symptoms, such as Grave’s Disease.

      Aspartame changes the ratio of amino acids in the blood, blocking or lowering the levels of serotonin, tyrosine, dopamine, norepinephrine, and adrenaline. Therefore, it is typical that aspartame symptoms cannot be detected in lab tests and on x-rays. Textbook disorders and diseases may actually be a toxic load as a result of aspartame poisoning.

      Ever gone to the doctor with real, physical symptoms, but he/she can’t find the cause? Well, it’s probably your diet, your environment, or both.

  21. QUESTION:
    What kind of damage does excessive consumption of Diet Coke have on the body?
    I'll admit it- i'm a Diet Coke addict- i have about 3 a day- sometimes a litre a day-I know it dehydrates me, as I'm always thirsty- What kinds of damage can excessive Diet soda consumption have on the body? Someone told me the chemicals in diet soda can wreck a person's teeth, organs, bones and brain....
    I didn't think Diet Coke had sugar

    • ANSWER:
      Adverse reactions and side effects of aspartame include:

      Eye
      blindness in one or both eyes
      decreased vision and/or other eye problems such as: blurring, bright flashes, squiggly lines, tunnel vision, decreased night vision
      pain in one or both eyes
      decreased tears
      trouble with contact lenses
      bulging eyes

      Ear
      tinnitus - ringing or buzzing sound
      severe intolerance of noise
      marked hearing impairment

      Neurologic
      epileptic seizures
      headaches, migraines and (some severe)
      dizziness, unsteadiness, both
      confusion, memory loss, both
      severe drowsiness and sleepiness
      paresthesia or numbness of the limbs
      severe slurring of speech
      severe hyperactivity and restless legs
      atypical facial pain
      severe tremors

      Psychological/Psychiatric
      severe depression
      irritability
      aggression
      anxiety
      personality changes
      insomnia
      phobias

      Chest
      palpitations, tachycardia
      shortness of breath
      recent high blood pressure

      Gastrointestinal
      nausea
      diarrhea, sometimes with blood in stools
      abdominal pain
      pain when swallowing

      Skin and Allergies
      itching without a rash
      lip and mouth reactions
      hives
      aggravated respiratory allergies such as asthma

      Endocrine and Metabolic
      loss of control of diabetes
      menstrual changes
      marked thinning or loss of hair
      marked weight loss
      gradual weight gain
      aggravated low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
      severe PMS

      Other
      frequency of voiding and burning during urination
      excessive thirst, fluid retention, leg swelling, and bloating
      increased susceptibility to infection

      Additional Symptoms of Aspartame Toxicity include the most critical symptoms of all
      death
      irreversible brain damage
      birth defects, including mental retardation
      peptic ulcers
      aspartame addiction and increased craving for sweets
      hyperactivity in children
      severe depression
      aggressive behavior
      suicidal tendencies

      Aspartame may trigger, mimic, or cause the following illnesses:
      Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
      Epstein-Barr
      Post-Polio Syndrome
      Lyme Disease
      Grave’s Disease
      Meniere’s Disease
      Alzheimer’s Disease
      ALS
      Epilepsy
      Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
      EMS
      Hypothyroidism
      Mercury sensitivity from Amalgam fillings
      Fibromyalgia
      Lupus
      non-Hodgkins
      Lymphoma
      Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)

      Aspartame changes the ratio of amino acids in the blood, blocking or lowering the levels of serotonin, tyrosine, dopamine, norepinephrine, and adrenaline. Therefore, it is typical that aspartame symptoms cannot be detected in lab tests and on x-rays. Textbook disorders and diseases may actually be a toxic load as a result of aspartame poisoning.

  22. QUESTION:
    Do you get symptoms when stop taking antidepressants?
    I was on prozac for 2 months. I randomly stopped a week ago just cause.
    I've been;
    -hot nonstop (VERY hot, and night sweats every nights more than once)
    -nauseas all the time
    -loss of appetite
    -anything I do eat makes me want to vomit
    -more depressed than I was before

    • ANSWER:
      It is not advisable to stop Prozac (or any other antidepressant) without your doctor's approvement. Prozac is an antidepressant in the class of Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). Sudden stopping may result in SSRI discontinuation syndrome.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SSRI_discontinuation_syndrome

      Do you know that depression may come from underactive thyroid or hypothyroidism (caused by Hashimoto's thyroiditis)? You should be tested for: TSH, thyroid hormones and most importantly anti-thyroid antibodies.
      Normal TSH is 0.3-3. (Some doctors still use the out-dated reference range of 0.5-5.5)
      Doctors are often misinformed and not knowledgeable about thyroid conditions.

      See the symptoms below:
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hypothyroidism/ds00353/dsection=symptoms
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hashimotos-disease/DS00567/DSECTION=symptoms
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com

  23. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of Thyroid malfunctioning in females ?

    • ANSWER:
      symptoms of hyperthyroidism:
      Weight loss

      Increased appetite

      Anxiety, nervousness and restlessness

      Heat intolerance

      Increased sweating

      Fatigue

      Muscle cramps

      Irregular menstrual periods in women

      Goitre or thyroid enlargement

      Palpitations and rapid heart rate

      Protruding eyes

      Excessive thirst

      Sleep disturbances

      Skin colour changes and itching

      Nausea and vomiting

      Uncoordinated movement

      Tremors

      Breast development in men

      High blood pressure

      Hair loss

      symptoms of hypothyroidism:

      Weakness and fatigue

      Cold intolerance

      Constipation

      Weight gain inspite of poor appetite

      Depression

      Elevated cholesterol levels

  24. QUESTION:
    how to reduce the prolactin level from a female body?
    it is an hormonal prblm which is creating delay in menstural periods & is making me fat, n also it is creating skin acne prblms?? pllssss help me out

    • ANSWER:
      How is a high prolactin level treated ?

      If you do have a high prolactin level, the good news is that this is treatment is very effective. Marginal elevations are usually of no clinical importance and can be ignored. If the problem is because of hypothyroidism or PCOD, then this needs to be corrected. If it's drug-induced, then stopping the drugs will solve the problem.

      High prolactin levels are best treated with medical therapy. There are two very effective drugs for this - bromocriptine; and cabergoline.

      Bromocriptine
      a drug which is used specifically to treat women with hyperprolactinemia . Bromocriptine lowers prolactin levels to normal and allows the ovary to get back to normal.

      Side effects: The drug often causes nausea and dizziness during the first few days of treatment but the chances of these symptoms occurring can be reduced by starting the drug at a very low dose and gradually building up to a maintenance dose of 2 or 3 tablets daily.

      Dose: A 2.5 mg tablet is available ; and the starting dose is usually 2.5 mg to 5 mg daily - taken at bedtime. After starting bromocriptine, prolactin levels can be tested (after at least one week of medication) to confirm that they have been brought down to normal. If the levels are still elevated, the dose will need to be increased. Once normal prolactin levels have been achieved (and some women need as much as 4 to 6 tablets a day to achieve this) this is then the maintenance dose. Once your prolactin blood level is within the normal range, your periods should become more regular and you should start ovulating normally again. Remember that bromocriptine only suppresses an elevated prolactin level while you are taking it - it does not "cure" the problem. This is why the tablets must be taken daily until a pregnancy occurs, after which they should be stopped. This is expensive medication - and some pharmaceutical companies may provide it at reduced rates if your doctor requests them to do so on your behalf.

      Some women cannot tolerate bromocriptine. For these women, an alternative option is cabergoline, which is as effective in reducing high prolactin levels, and has fewer side effects.

      Cabergoline

      is frequently used as a second-line agent in the management of prolactinomas when bromocriptine is ineffective or is poorly tolerated.

      This is available as a 0.5 mg tablet. The dose is usually 1 tablet per week. This can be increased as needed, until the prolactin level becomes normal.
      Good luck

  25. QUESTION:
    I have cardio myopathy and have been taking crestor and now I can hardly walk without almost passing out is cr?
    Now I can hardly walk without becoming weak and dizzy is crestor making my cardio worse and dangerous.

    • ANSWER:
      Stop this dangerous drug immediately. Statins destroy mucsles. Remember your heart is a muscle.

      The release of Crestor, the newest of the statin drugs, was associated almost immediately with a need for a revised package insert because of a rash of adverse drug reports of muscle and renal toxicity. What else could you expect from Astra-Zeneca's rosuvastatin, promoted as the most powerful of the powerful statin drugs already on the market?

      Suddenly, increased numbers of rhabdomyolysis reports began to surface in Crestor users associated with secondary kidney damage and a more ominous threat of specific primary renal toxicity as well and the necessity to issue emergency warnings advising doctors to exercise special caution in the use of this drug with hypothyroidism, renal insufficiency, Asian sub-population groups and cyclosporine and gemfibrozil takers.

      Statins inhibit CoQ10 enzyme. Researchers believe that the beneficial effect of CoQ10 in the prevention and treatment of heart disease is due to its ability to improve energy production in cells, inhibit blood clot formation, and act as an antioxidant.

      Your phony doctor prescribed a drug that is acually damaging your heart , rather than protect it. His kick back from drug companies was more important that your life.

      Neurological side effects: Amnesia, confusion, forgetfulness, and disorientation, increase of any pre-existing senility and persistent loss of short-term memory
      Muscle pain: You may feel this pain as a soreness, tiredness or weakness in your muscles. The pain can be a mild discomfort, or it can be severe enough to make your daily activities difficult. You may also develop joint pain, muscle ache and fatigue.
      Liver Damage: Statin use could cause your liver to increase its production of enzymes. If left unchecked, increased liver enzymes may lead to permanent liver damage. Liver problems may develop without symptoms which is why people who take statins should have their liver function tested about six weeks after they start taking a statin.
      Digestive Problems: Nausea, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, or constipation can occur after taking a statin.
      Rash or flushing: You can develop a rash or flushing after you start taking a statin and these may occur sporadically.
      Migraines and headaches: If you are prone to either you may find that statin use will trigger your headaches and migraines more often and they can become more severe. Dizziness and flu-like symptoms are also common side-effects.

      This is very serious, get a new doctor .
      Also Niacin work as well as statins , without the bad side effects. But only the Niacin called Nicotinic Acid.
      Exercise also lowers cholesterol. I nordic walk . Google it . Exercise lowered my cholesterol from 240 to 183.

      Again stop this killer drug today.

      TIN

  26. QUESTION:
    what exactly is vertigo in terms of a medical term?
    i have vertigo. i know is some type of dizziness i had it when i was teenager now it came back . what causes that? and do i need some type of treatment? i already ate some pills that the doctor gave me

    • ANSWER:
      Vertigo is a disease which is often incorrectly confused with dizziness. It is actually related to problems in the inner ear, where the balance centers are located, although this is not the only reason.

      Influenza, Head injury, certain medications, Diseases like Ménière’s disease, multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, sinusitis, panic attacks, migraine headaches, and problems with metabolism, such as hypothyroidism, high blood triglycerides, diabetes, and hypoglycemia etc. are some of the reasons why you may get vertigo attacks.

      Medications such as Benadryl or Valium may either be taken orally, with a skin patch or given through an IV. If vertigo is caused as a result of a bacterial infection of the middle ear, antibiotics may be administered. More severe episodes of vertigo may also require surgery.
      Natural remedies provide excellent symptomatic relief for dizziness and nausea associated with vertigo and improve inner ear balance. Herbal remedies containing homeopathic ingredients may be taken at the first sign of symptoms and are safe to use for people of all ages.

      Homeopathic ingredients such as Cocculus indicus, Lobelia inflata and Gelsemium have proven to highly effective in relieving the symptoms of dizziness, weakness, fainting, fatigue, headaches and emotional upsets. In addition, Bryonia alba may be beneficial for headaches, and for individuals who perspire where the slightest movement may be disturbing.

      You may get more info here http://www.healthherbsandnutrition.com/remedies/v/vertigo.htm

  27. QUESTION:
    Could I be suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?
    Recently, I am extremely tired. I have to lie down after just 15min of standing up; and get exhausted when I have to do a basic task like washing dishes or putting away the laundry. I am diabetic (type 1) and used to wake up when hypoglycemic, but nowadays, I just keep on sleeping and have had severe hypoglycemia twice in the past week alone - one of which resulted in a hypoclycemic coma... Is it possible to be suffering from CFS, or is there another plausible cause?

    • ANSWER:
      The most commonly used diagnostic criteria and definition of CFS for research and clinical purposes were published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC recommends the following three criteria be fulfilled:

      A new onset (not lifelong) of severe fatigue for six consecutive months or greater duration which is unrelated to exertion, is not substantially relieved by rest, and is not a result of other medical conditions.
      The fatigue causes a significant reduction of previous activity levels.
      Four or more of the following symptoms that last six months or longer:

      - Impaired memory or concentration
      - Post-exertional malaise, where physical or mental exertions bring on "extreme, prolonged exhaustion and sickness"
      - Unrefreshing sleep
      - Muscle pain (myalgia)
      - Pain in multiple joints (arthralgia)
      - Headaches of a new kind or greater severity
      - Sore throat, frequent or recurring
      Tender lymph nodes (cervical or axillary)
      - Other common symptoms include:
      - Irritable bowel, abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea or bloating
      - Chills and night sweats
      - Brain fog
      - Chest pain
      - Shortness of breath
      - Chronic cough
      - Visual disturbances (blurring, sensitivity to light, eye pain or dry eyes)
      - Allergies or sensitivities to foods, alcohol, odors, chemicals, medications or noise
      - Difficulty maintaining upright position (orthostatic instability, irregular heartbeat, dizziness, balance problems or fainting)
      - Psychological problems (depression, irritability, mood swings, anxiety, panic attacks)

      The CDC proposes that persons with symptoms resembling those of CFS consult a physician to rule out several treatable illnesses: Lyme disease, "sleep disorders, depression, alcohol/substance abuse, diabetes, hypothyroidism, mononucleosis (mono), lupus, multiple sclerosis (MS), chronic hepatitis and various malignancies." Medications can also cause side effects that mimic symptoms of CFS.

      The above symptoms only present a guide. What you want to do is to rule out other types of illnesses and diseases. CFS is normally diagnosed by a process of elimination. In other words by eliminating such illnesses as mono or lupus or MS the doctor may eventually conclude that what is left is CFS. What you don't want to do is conclude that you have CFS when in fact it is something far more serious.

  28. QUESTION:
    I'm 45, late period, cramps, low back pain, and not pregnant. What do you think?
    I know I should consult a doctor, but I'm looking for possiblities. I'm 45, had both tubes removed years ago, low back pain, low intermitant abdominal cramping for 4 days, nausea without vomiting, and 3 weeks late .
    LED, I want you to remember that old crack when you hit 40. ;-)
    To the Baby Girls: Life gets better with age!

    • ANSWER:
      Oh, my dear ... you have 'only just begun' to 'have problems' with your 'periods.' What you are experiencing is one of the many 'symptoms' you can have with 'perimenopause' ... the period BEFORE your periods 'stop totally for a full year' (FULL menopause). Yes, you should see your doctor, because you could also have another disease or physical problem (like hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetes, or even ovarian or cervical cancer) ... but from your 'description' (yes, even the 'nausea without vomiting') sounds like 'perimenopause' to me.

  29. QUESTION:
    I've been feeling very weak and nauseous the past week, whats up?
    I'm always tired and yawning, I feel very weak and it's like I'm always nauseous after I eat. Even randomly I feel nauseous and a couple times I even got sick a bit. I don't feel crazy sick or like I have the flu or anything. But somethings not right! Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be a number of things. At her age, it could even be problems compounding or related complications. Age can adversely effect recovery time or tend to cause things to deteriorate faster.
      What are her blood sugars running?
      Most likely, I would say hyperglycemia (high blood sugar), but it could be the diabetes with hypertension (high blood pressure) and/or hypothyroidism (under-active thyroid). These things tend to go together.
      Edit: Annie mentioned hypoglycemia, and it could also be that. I missed the rapid heartbeat the first time I read it. The thing to remember is that different people have different symptoms. With the nausea though, I would still say hyperglycemia. The blood sugars really are very important for us to help better.
      She should go to her doctor with all these things also.

  30. QUESTION:
    Can drinking to much sugar-free drinks make you sick? And is it bad for you?
    My husband has high sugar so for the last month we have been dirnking sugar free drinks. Here in the last week we have been going through almost 1.5 gallons a day of sugar free hawaiian punch.

    Today we have felt bad sick, with constant trips to the bathroom if you knwo what I mean.

    Is sugar-free stuff bad for you? How much is to much? And has anyone else had this problem?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      There are over 92 different health side effects associated with aspartame consumption. It seems surreal, but true. How can one chemical create such chaos?

      Aspartame dissolves into solution and can therefore travel throughout the body and deposit within any tissue. The body digests aspartame unlike saccharin, which does not break down within humans.

      The multitude of aspartame side effects are indicative to your genetic individuality and physical weaknesses. It is important to put two and two together, nonetheless, and identify which side effects aspartame is creating within you.

      Aspartame Side Effects

      The components of aspartame can lead to a number of health problems, as you have read. Side effects can occur gradually, can be immediate, or can be acute reactions. According to Lendon Smith, M.D. there is an enormous population suffering from side effects associated with aspartame, yet have no idea why drugs, supplements and herbs don’t relieve their symptoms. Then, there are users who don’t ‘appear’ to suffer immediate reactions at all. Even these individuals are susceptible to the long-term damage caused by excitatory amino acids, phenylalanine, methanol, and DKP.

      Adverse reactions and side effects of aspartame include:

      Eye
      blindness in one or both eyes
      decreased vision and/or other eye problems such as: blurring, bright flashes, squiggly lines, tunnel vision, decreased night vision
      pain in one or both eyes
      decreased tears
      trouble with contact lenses
      bulging eyes

      Ear
      tinnitus - ringing or buzzing sound
      severe intolerance of noise
      marked hearing impairment

      Neurologic
      epileptic seizures
      headaches, migraines and (some severe)
      dizziness, unsteadiness, both
      confusion, memory loss, both
      severe drowsiness and sleepiness
      paresthesia or numbness of the limbs
      severe slurring of speech
      severe hyperactivity and restless legs
      atypical facial pain
      severe tremors

      Psychological/Psychiatric
      severe depression
      irritability
      aggression
      anxiety
      personality changes
      insomnia
      phobias

      Chest
      palpitations, tachycardia
      shortness of breath
      recent high blood pressure

      Gastrointestinal
      nausea
      diarrhea, sometimes with blood in stools
      abdominal pain
      pain when swallowing

      Skin and Allergies
      itching without a rash
      lip and mouth reactions
      hives
      aggravated respiratory allergies such as asthma

      Endocrine and Metabolic
      loss of control of diabetes
      menstrual changes
      marked thinning or loss of hair
      marked weight loss
      gradual weight gain
      aggravated low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
      severe PMS

      Other
      frequency of voiding and burning during urination
      excessive thirst, fluid retention, leg swelling, and bloating
      increased susceptibility to infection

      Additional Symptoms of Aspartame Toxicity include the most critical symptoms of all
      death
      irreversible brain damage
      birth defects, including mental retardation
      peptic ulcers
      aspartame addiction and increased craving for sweets
      hyperactivity in children
      severe depression
      aggressive behavior
      suicidal tendencies

      Aspartame may trigger, mimic, or cause the following illnesses:
      Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
      Epstein-Barr
      Post-Polio Syndrome
      Lyme Disease
      Grave’s Disease
      Meniere’s Disease
      Alzheimer’s Disease
      ALS
      Epilepsy
      Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
      EMS
      Hypothyroidism
      Mercury sensitivity from Amalgam fillings
      Fibromyalgia
      Lupus
      non-Hodgkins
      Lymphoma
      Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)

      These are not allergies or sensitivities, but diseases and disease syndromes. Aspartame poisoning is commonly misdiagnosed because aspartame symptoms mock textbook ‘disease’ symptoms, such as Grave’s Disease.

      Aspartame changes the ratio of amino acids in the blood, blocking or lowering the levels of serotonin, tyrosine, dopamine, norepinephrine, and adrenaline. Therefore, it is typical that aspartame symptoms cannot be detected in lab tests and on x-rays. Textbook disorders and diseases may actually be a toxic load as a result of aspartame poisoning.

      Ever gone to the doctor with real, physical symptoms, but he/she can’t find the cause? Well, it’s probably your diet, your environment, or both.

      Aspartame is the common denominator for over 92 different health symptoms at the root of modern disease. The Aspartame Detoxification Program demonstrates the most effective way to reverse disease symptoms is removing the underlying cause - aspartame.

      I counsel aspartame victims worldwide and have witnessed nine out of 10 clients restore their health by following the Aspartame Detoxification Program. Begin with detoxifying your body of all residual chemical toxins from aspartame's chemical make up of phenylalanine, aspartic acid and methanol and their toxic by-products, and see if any adverse health symptoms remain. Try the Aspartame Detoxification Program, and within 30 days your symptoms should disappear.

      Steps:

      1. Remove all sugar-free products with aspartame from your diet.
      2. Learn to 'read' your body. Begin recording any health changes.
      3. Get a hair analysis.
      4. Be happy with yourself.
      5. Detoxify.
      6. Restore depleted nutrients.
      7. Exercise and get plenty of rest.
      8. Eat 75% raw foods at every meal.
      9. Drink water, water, water.
      10. Get control of your life.

  31. QUESTION:
    What are the side affects from Levoxyl?
    I have just been diagnosed with a underactive thyroid disease. I am aslo anemic, I am a 23/f and weigh 97 pounds. Do you think I will lose any weight from having to take this medication?I only have to take 50 mcg instead of the hole 100 mcg because taking the hole pill would be too much for my body. I do have to take this medication the rest of my life!Please if anyone knows what the side affects are let me know because my doctor gave me samples for 3 months, and when I got home the paper to the medicine wasn't in there, and it is 5:30 and it's too late to call the doctor. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Levoxyl is a synthetic form of a thyroid hormone. The drug should be taken on an empty stomach, either 1 hour before breakfast in the morning, or 3 hours after your last meal.

      Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) may be related to your anemia.

      Here are some instruction for the medication

      How should I take levothyroxine?

      Take this medication exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist to explain them to you.
      Take each dose with a full glass (8 ounces) of water.

      Take this medication at the same time each day whenever possible. Thyroid hormone is usually taken in the morning to prevent insomnia at night. Follow your doctor's instructions.

      It is important to take levothyroxine regularly to get the most benefit.

      Do not stop taking this medication without talking to your doctor. It is important to take this medication to replace the thyroid hormone that the body is not producing. Even if you feel well, you may still need to take this medicine every day.
      Do not change brands or change to a generic levothyroxine drug product without first talking to your doctor. Some levothyroxine products may not be interchangeable.

      Your doctor may want you to have blood tests or other medical evaluations during treatment with levothyroxine to monitor progress and side effects.
      Store levothyroxine at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

      Symptoms of a levothyroxine overdose may include chest pain, nervousness, trouble sleeping, tremor, rapid heartbeat, nausea, headache, fever, sweating, shortness of breath, heat intolerance, irregular menses, increased appetite, decreased weight, diarrhea, and abdominal pain.

      Besides an overdose the only other side effects would be allergic reactions.

      You may wish to see and endocrinologist, a specialist who deals with metabolism.

      For some reason giving you samples for 3 months and having you split pills doesn't sit well with me. I feel he should have written you a prescription and planned on seeing you within 6 weeks to see your progress.

      I had my thyroid removed after thyroid cancer, and have been on thyroid medication ever since.

      Just a response to the person who mentioned armor thyroid, it is a natural thyroid medication taken from pig's thyroid and some people feel much better on it than just taking what your doctor gave you. For many people it makes no difference.

  32. QUESTION:
    What is the toxicity of digoxin?
    Can it really bring the heartbeat to a dead stop? Is this true, literally? Is it just one extra dose or is it like a dozen or more overdoses which can do this? How narrow is the margin?

    • ANSWER:
      Digoxin's narrow therapeutic range (0.8 to 2 ng/ml) makes toxicity quite common: It's estimated to be present in 5% to 20% of all hospitalized patients on digoxin. Testing serum drug levels about 8 hours after each drug administration helps detect toxicity. Log and report digoxin levels greater than 2 ng/ml and a heart rate below 60 bpm; these are key indicators of digoxin toxicity, though many patients who are on digoxin routinely have heart rates below 60 bpm.

      Renal insufficiency, drug interaction, hypercalcemia, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, hypothyroidism, and advanced age all increase the risk of digoxin toxicity. (See Raising the Risks for common drugs that can cause problems.) Gastrointestinal symptoms of toxicity include anorexia, nausea, and vomiting. Neurologic symptoms include headaches, malaise, fatigue, neuralgic pain, dementia, seeing yellow or green halos around objects, and seizures. Cardiac signs include functional rhythms, heart blocks, ventricular rhythms, acute tachycardia, and bradycardia.

  33. QUESTION:
    I just started taking lithium carbonate 300 mg in the am, 600 mg in the evening?
    What are the side effects, did anyone experience weight gain or weight loss on this medication?

    • ANSWER:
      This is from the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) site, so it should be reliable:

      "Common side effects of lithium include nausea, loss of appetite, and mild diarrhea. These side effects will usually go away after the first few weeks as your body adjusts to the medication. Dizziness and hand tremors have also been reported. Increased production of urine and excessive thirst are two common side effects that are usually not serious problems. Other side effects of lithium include weight gain, hypothyroidism (low levels of thyroid hormone), increased white blood cell count, acne, and skin rashes. Signs of hypothyroidism include dry skin, hair loss, sensitivity to cold, hoarseness, mental depression, and weight gain.

      Consumers should tell their doctor immediately if they develop lack of coordination, muscle weakness, slurred speech, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, confusion, or an increase in tremors or shaking. These symptoms may be a sign of having too much lithium in the body which requires medical attention."

      I hope this helps. Check the source link for more information.

  34. QUESTION:
    What are the signs of a miscarriage?
    I had sexual relations about two months ago and then that month my period was very very light like it wasn't even there, almost spotting. And now about ten days later i'm having very heavy bleeding. Are those signs that I had a miscarriage?

    • ANSWER:
      It amazes me how completely heartless some people can be ... no wonder we have so many stains on society. (re: one of the previous posts)

      A miscarriage occurs when a woman is pregnant and her womb expels the unborn child. It results from natural causes within the first 20 weeks of pregnancy.

      What is going on in the body?
      A miscarriage takes place after the unborn child and placenta stop growing. This makes pregnancy hormone levels fall. The following symptoms of pregnancy may no longer appear:

      • breast tenderness
      • nausea
      • fatigue

      A miscarriage starts when the womb begins to contract. This causes cramping and discomfort. It may also cause vaginal spotting or bleeding. A miscarriage is complete when the contents of the womb are expelled. When no fetal tissue remains, the cervix will close. The uterus will shrink in size. The bleeding will slow and then stop.

      What are the signs and symptoms of the condition?
      A pregnant woman having a miscarriage may experience these signs or symptoms:

      • low back pain
      • passage of some tissue or clots from the vagina
      • pelvic or abdominal cramping
      • vaginal bleeding or spotting

      What are the causes and risks of the condition?
      An unborn child that fails to develop or is abnormal in some way is the most likely cause of a miscarriage that occurs in the first trimester of pregnancy.
      What can be done to prevent the condition?
      Not all miscarriages can be prevented. But taking certain actions can help. Several months before pregnancy and during the entire pregnancy, a woman should follow these guidelines. Avoid alcohol and caffeine.Stay away from pesticides, and chemical solvents such as paint thinners. Avoid all medicines unless recommended by the doctor. This includes those sold over-the-counter, prescriptions, and herbal remedies.Eat a diet rich in folic acid and take multivitamins.Maintain good control of diseases such as diabetes and hypothyroidism. Notify the doctor of any other risk factors, such as PTSD.Report any symptoms of sexually transmitted disease to the doctor. Stop smoking.
      How is the condition diagnosed?
      A blood or urine test will be done to confirm that a pregnancy exists. The level of the pregnancy hormone HCG may be checked several times over a period of days or weeks. Rising levels suggest that the unborn child is growing. Levels that fall or stay steady suggest a malformed or dying unborn child.

  35. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever taken a small dose of prozac?
    What are your experiences taken it? Side effects? Worth taking? Did you stop taking it and was what was hard about coming off them? Thanks. I'm trying to learn more about this drug.

    • ANSWER:
      Prozac does not work for everyone. You should only take Prozac if it was prescribed to you by a doctor, and if you have a good relationship with your doctor so that he/she can keep an eye on you on a regular basis to monitor your blood levels, etc. You should never take Prozac without a doctor's prescription.

      Prozac is one of many antidepressants that can actually make your situation worse if you suffer from depression. The warning that it carries lets you know right off the bat that it can actually increase your chance of committing suicide, lead you to have suicidal feelings and tendencies, etc. Again, this is why you should only take Prozac under direct doctor supervision.

      When used for depression, you should only take Prozac if you suffer from major depression. Major depression is defined as any depression that lasts 4 or more days a week on a weekly basis. Prozac is only helpful with depression if you suffer from 5 or more of the following symptoms of major depression: depressed mood, loss of interest in normal everyday activities and hobbies, significant change in weight and appetite, insomnia or hypersomnia, psychomotor agitation or retardation, increased fatigue, feelings of guilt or worthlessness, slowed thinking or impaired concentration, suicide attempts or suicide ideas.

      When used for depression, Prozac is pretty much useless with counseling which will help make sure that you a) solve whatever is causing you to be depressed if possible; b) give you coping methods to deal with a life long depression illness; and c) monitor you closely for suicidal tendencies, thoughts, ideas, and plans.

      Prozac is used for other things like in treatment programs for disorders like some types of Bullimia and OCD as well as PMDD. I wouldn't recommend Prozac for these disorders, or depression for that matter because of the fact that it actually makes you want to commit suicide, and will make you feel even more worthless and useless than you felt before taking Prozac.

      The list of side effects for Prozac are ridiculous. The side effects combined with the suicidal tendencies really make Prozac not the best choice for most people. There are many pills that will increase the way your body feels, lessen your depression, etc without all of the harmful side effects that Prozac has

      Prozac's side effects are:
      chest pain, chills; chills and fever, face edema, intentional overdose, malaise, pelvic pain, suicide attempt; acute abdominal syndrome, hypothermia, intentional injury, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, photosensitivity reaction, hemorrhage, hypertension, palpitation; Infrequent: angina pectoris, arrhythmia, congestive heart failure, hypotension, migraine, myocardial infarct, postural hypotension, syncope, tachycardia, vascular headache; atrial fibrillation, bradycardia, cerebral embolism, cerebral ischemia, cerebrovascular accident, extrasystoles, heart arrest, heart block, pallor, peripheral vascular disorder, phlebitis, shock, thrombophlebitis, thrombosis, vasospasm, ventricular arrhythmia, ventricular extrasystoles, ventricular fibrillation, increased appetite, nausea and vomiting; aphthous stomatitis, cholelithiasis, colitis, dysphagia, eructation, esophagitis, gastritis, gastroenteritis, glossitis, gum hemorrhage, hyperchlorhydria, increased salivation, liver function tests abnormal, melena, mouth ulceration, nausea/vomiting/diarrhea, stomach ulcer, stomatitis, thirst; biliary pain, bloody diarrhea, cholecystitis, duodenal ulcer, enteritis, esophageal ulcer, fecal incontinence, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, hematemesis, hemorrhage of colon, hepatitis, intestinal obstruction, liver fatty deposit, pancreatitis, peptic ulcer, rectal hemorrhage, salivary gland enlargement, stomach ulcer hemorrhage, tongue edema, hypothyroidism; diabetic acidosis, diabetes mellitus, anemia, ecchymosis; blood dyscrasia, hypochromic anemia, leukopenia, lymphedema, lymphocytosis, petechia, purpura, thrombocythemia, thrombocytopenia, weight gain; dehydration, generalized edema, gout, hypercholesteremia, hyperlipemia, hypokalemia, peripheral edema; alcohol intolerance, alkaline phosphatase increased, BUN increased, creatine phosphokinase increased, hyperkalemia, hyperuricemia, hypocalcemia, iron deficiency anemia, SGPT increased, arthritis, bone pain, bursitis, leg cramps, tenosynovitis; arthrosis, chondrodystrophy, myasthenia, myopathy, myositis, osteomyelitis, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, agitation, amnesia, confusion, emotional lability, sleep disorder; Infrequent: abnormal gait, acute brain syndrome, akathisia, apathy, ataxia, buccoglossal syndrome, CNS depression, CNS stimulation, depersonalization, euphoria, hallucinations, hostility, hyperkinesia, hypertonia, hypesthesia, incoordination, libido increased, myoclonus, neuralgia, neuropathy, neurosis, paranoid reaction, personality disorder, psychosis, vertigo; abnormal electroencephalogram, antisocial reaction, circumoral paresthesia, coma, delusions, dysarthr

  36. QUESTION:
    What is a goiter, its symptoms and treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      Goiter is an enlargement of the thyroid gland. The thyroid gland is a small gland located in the neck, below your Adam’s apple. The thyroid can be enlarged due to generalized enlargement of the thyroid or nodules (tissue growths) within the thyroid. The thyroid gland produces the hormones thyroxine (also called T4) and a small amount of triiodothyronine (also called T3). Most of the T4 is converted to T3 outside of the thyroid. These thyroid hormones influence such bodily functions as a person’s body temperature, mood and excitability, pulse rate, digestive functions, and other processes necessary for life. It is important to understand that goiter is not cancer and that most goiters are, in fact, benign.

      Main symptoms include:

      1. A swelling, ranging in size from a small nodule to a massive lump, in the front of the neck just below your Adam’s apple.
      2. A feeling of tightness in the throat area.
      3. Difficulty breathing (shortness of breath), coughing, wheezing (due to compression of the windpipe).
      4. Difficulty swallowing (due to compression of the esophagus).
      5. Hoarseness.
      6. Neck vein distention.
      7. Dizziness when the arms are raised above the head.

      Other symptoms can include:

      8. An increased resting pulse rate.
      9. Rapid heartbeat.
      10. Diarrhea, nausea, vomiting.
      11. Sweating without exercise or increased room temperature.
      12. Shaking.
      13. Agitation.
      (The above group of symptoms are signs of hyperthyroidism -- a condition in which the thyroid is overstimulated. Some people with goiter may also have hyperthyroidism.)

      14. Fatigue, constipation, dry skin
      15. Weight gain
      16. Menstrual irregularities
      (The above group of symptoms are signs of hypothyroidism -- a condition in which the thyroid is underactive. Some people with goiter may also have hypothyroidism

      Treatment options depend on the size of the enlargement, your symptoms, and the underlying cause. Treatments typically considered by your doctor include:

      1. No treatment/"watchful waiting." If the goiter is small and not bothering you, your doctor may decide that no treatment is necessary at this time, but will continue to watch your condition for changes.

      2. Medications. Levothyroxine (Levothroid, Synthroid) is a thyroid hormone replacement therapy that can be prescribed if your doctor determines that the cause of your goiter is an underactive thyroid (a condition called hypothyroidism). Other medications can be prescribed if tests indicate your thyroid is overactive (hyperthyroidism). Aspirin or a corticosteroid mediation might be prescribed if the underlying cause of your goiter is inflammation. Small does of iodine (in the form of Lugol’s or potassium iodine solution) can be prescribed if the goiter is due to iodine deficiency.

      3. Radioactive iodine treatment. This treatment, used in cases of an overactive thyroid gland, involves injecting radioactive iodine into your bloodstream. The iodine is delivered to the thyroid gland, killing thyroid cells, which shrinks the gland. Radioactive iodine treatment is usually followed by the use of hormone replacement therapy for life.

      4. Biopsy. This may be required if you have large nodules in the thyroid to exclude cancer.

      5. Surgery. Surgery, to remove all or part of the thyroid gland, may be necessary if the goiter is large and causing difficulty with breathing and swallowing or sometimes to remove nodules and certainly if cancer is present. Depending on the amount of thyroid gland removed, lifelong thyroid hormone replacement therapy may be necessary.

  37. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to get sick cause of exaustion?
    i have been doing a lot lately and this morning i felt sick and dizzy.nauseated.migrain

    • ANSWER:
      Exhaustion symptoms or excessive fatigue disorder

      Normally exhausted people show following apparent symptoms:
      Tired for no reason.
      Having trouble getting up in the morning.
      Depending on tea, coffee or colas to keep their going.
      Feeling run down and stressed.
      Dragging themselves through each day.
      Struggling to keep up with life's daily demands.
      Unable to bounce back from stress or illness.
      Not having fun any more.
      Experiencing decreased sex drive.
      Simply too tired to enjoy life.

      Exhaustion symptoms or excessive fatigue disorder has three defining characteristics:
      Feelings of excessive fatigue, weakness, and lack of energy,
      Increasing irritability, and
      Feelings of demoralization

      Comedian Dave Chappelle was hospitalized over the weekend for what his spokeswoman called "exhaustion." He's just the latest instance of a long celebrity tradition: Eminem canceled a tour due to "exhaustion" and other medical issues, Lindsay Lohan was carted off for "heat exhaustion," and Mariah Carey took a post-Glitter break after being hospitalized for "extreme exhaustion." Is exhaustion actually a medical diagnosis?

      World Health Organization, lists conditions of medical exhaustion due to heat, pregnancy, exposure, excessive exertion, and combat, as well as plain old "malaise and fatigue." .

      The fact that exhaustion has no single cause—you could be exhausted from too much work, improper nutrition, or intoxication—leads some doctors to avoid using it in diagnoses.

      Causes of Exhaustion:
      Stress
      Adrenal Insufficiency
      Hypothyroidism
      Anemia
      It's also a possible side effect of many prescription drugs, including beta blockers, muscle relaxants, and mood stabilizers

      Warning signs of heat exhaustion include:

      heavy sweating
      paleness
      muscle cramps
      tiredness
      weakness
      dizziness
      headache
      nausea or vomiting
      fainting

      So your symptoms of headaches ; dizziness and nausea can be all related to exhaustion.

      Heat exhaustion treatment:

      Cooling measures that may be effective include:
      cool, non-alcoholic beverages, as directed by your physician
      rest
      cool shower, bath, or sponge bath
      an air-conditioned environment
      Lightweight clothing

      Treatment for exhaustion varies depending on the cause. If it's the result of stress, a good night's sleep and some fluids are often enough to calm the nerves. (Exercise is good, too, once you're ready to stand.) More deep-seated exhaustion may require hormonal supplements or antidepressants

      How to avoid heat exhaustion
      1) Drink plenty of fluids and remember to alternate between water and something like gatorade or powerade that contains electrolytes. to avoid dehydration.
      2) Avoid caffeine and alcohol which can speed up dehydration
      3) Try to schedule physical activity in the early morning or late evening.
      4) If you must work outside during the heat of the day, make sure to take mini-breaks often and find a shady spot to cool down
      5) Make sure to dress in light weight/light colored clothes when going out

      And finally know the symptoms. Symptoms include headache, weakness, fatigue, vomiting, muscle cramps, etc

  38. QUESTION:
    hello im 31,my prolactin test is too high..Is it difficult for me to get pregnant?
    i have milky nipple discharge and my period is not regular anymore. sometimes 3 to 4 months no period.. doctor told me something wrong with my pituitary gland.. im worried if its difficult for me to get pregnant.. Thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Hyperprolactinaemia (BrE) or hyperprolactinemia (AmE) is the presence of abnormally high levels of prolactin in the blood. Normal levels are less than 580 mIU/L for women, and less than 450 mIU/L for men.

      The hormone prolactin is downregulated by dopamine and is upregulated by estrogen. A falsely high measurement may occur due to the presence of the biologically inactive macroprolactin in the serum. This can show up as high prolactin in some types of tests, but is asymptomatic.

      High prolactin levels tend to suppress the ovulatory cycle by inhibiting the secretion of both FSH and GnRH

      Unusually high amounts Of prolactin are suspected to be responsible for impotence and loss of libido

      yperprolactinaemia may be caused by either disinhibition (e.g. compression of the pituitary stalk or reduced dopamine levels) or excess production from a prolactinoma (a pituitary gland adenoma tumour). A prolactin level of 1000–5000mIU/L could be from either mechanism, but >5000mIU/L is likely due to an adenoma with macroadenomas (large tumours over 10 mm diameter) having levels of up to 100,000mIU/L. Hyperprolactinemia inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) by increasing the release of dopamine from the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (dopamine inhibits GnRH secretion), thus inhibiting gonadal steroidogenesis, which is the cause of many of the symptoms described below:

      There is a suspicion that Minoxidil, a potassium channel opener, may be related to the development of this disease. A two year test with Minoxidil, under normal dosing parameters, was carried out on rats which caused pheochromocytomas in both males and females, and preputial gland adenomas in males

      Physiological causes

      Physiological causes (i.e. as result of normal body functioning): pregnancy, breastfeeding, stress, sleep.

      [edit] Prescription drugs

      Use of prescription drugs are the most common cause of hyperprolactinaemia. Prolactin secretion in the pituitary is normally suppressed by the brain chemical, dopamine. Drugs that block the effects of dopamine at the pituitary or deplete dopamine stores in the brain may cause the pituitary to secrete prolactin. These drugs include the major tranquilizers (phenothiazines), trifluoperazine (Stelazine), ,and haloperidol (Haldol); some antipsychotic medications; metoclopramide (Reglan), used to treat gastroesophageal reflux and the nausea caused by certain cancer drugs; and less often, alpha-methyldopa and reserpine, used to control hypertension. Finally oestrogens and TRH.

      [edit] Diseases

      Prolactinoma or other tumors arising in or near the pituitary—such as those that cause acromegaly or Cushing's syndrome—may block the flow of dopamine from the brain to the prolactin-secreting cells, likewise division of the pituitary stalk or hypothalamic disease. Other causes include chronic renal failure, hypothyroidism and sarcoidosis. Some women with polycystic ovary syndrome may have mildly elevated prolactin levels.

      Apart from diagnosing hyperprolactinaemia and hypopituitarism, prolactin levels are often determined by physicians in patients who have suffered a seizure, when there is doubt whether this was an epileptic seizure or a non-epileptic seizure. Shortly after epileptic seizures, prolactin levels often rise, while they are normal in non-epileptic seizures.

      Symptoms

      In women, a high blood level of prolactin often causes hypoestrogenism with anovulatory infertility and a decrease in menstruation. In some women, menstruation may disappear altogether (amenorrhea). In others, menstruation may become irregular or menstrual flow may change. Women who are not pregnant or nursing may begin producing breast milk. Some women may experience a loss of libido (interest in sex). Intercourse may become painful because of vaginal dryness.

      In men, the most common symptoms of hyperprolactinemia are impotence, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and infertility. Because men have no reliable indicator such as menstruation to signal a problem, many men with hyperprolactinemia being caused by an adenoma may delay going to the doctor until they have headaches or eye problems caused by the enlarged pituitary pressing against nearby eye nerves. They may not recognize a gradual loss of sexual function or libido. Only after treatment do some men realize they had a problem with sexual function.

      Because of hypoestrogenism, hyperprolactinaemia can lead to osteoporosis.

      [edit] Diagnosis

      A doctor will test for prolactin blood levels in women with unexplained milk secretion (galactorrhea) or irregular menses or infertility, and in men with impaired sexual function and, in rare cases, milk secretion. If prolactin is high, a doctor will test thyroid function and ask first about other conditions and medications known to raise prolactin secretion. Whilst a plain X-ray of the bones surrounding the pituitary may reveal the presence of a large macro-adenoma, the small micro-adenoma will not be apparent. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive test for detecting pituitary tumors and determining their size. MRI scans may be repeated periodically to assess tumor progression and the effects of therapy. Computed Tomography (CT scan) also gives an image of the pituitary, but it is less sensitive than the MRI.

      In addition to assessing the size of the pituitary tumor, doctors also look for damage to surrounding tissues, and perform tests to assess whether production of other pituitary hormones is normal. Depending on the size of the tumor, the doctor may request an eye exam with measurement of visual fields.

  39. QUESTION:
    Any guys out there with hypothyroidism?
    I'm 42 years old and I've got a LOT of the symptoms that seem to have increased over the past several months......extreme fatigue, cold sensitivity, irritability, depression, muscle and joint pain/cramps (especially shoulder), and weight gain (even though I have a very healthy diet and exercise). But all of the information I find is about women...What about the guys? What symptoms are you having? What's helped?

    • ANSWER:
      Hyperthyroidism more likely results in weight loss. But i am sure it can be different for everyone. Keep in mind that as you age your body will need different nutrients, it may be a simple lack of a certain vitamin. Has there been any nausea, diarrhea, or weakness? Notice any thing odd going on with your eyelids? The best thing is to have your blood tested by your doctor. Hyperthyroidism can be treated fairly easily often with a one time dose of radio iodine, but because the doses are hard to regulate, this can cause a complete reversal into an under active thyroid. But there are medications you can take to control your problem if indeed that's whats it turns out to be.

  40. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of Hypothyroidism?

    • ANSWER:
      -slow breathing (less than 14 per minute)
      -slow heart rate (less than 60 per minute)
      -sluggishness, fatigue, decreased deep tendon reflexes
      -weight gain despite not eating
      -depression, irritability, confusion,
      -loss of appetite, anorexia, nausea, vomiting
      -hair loss, loss of eyebrows, hair dull and fragile
      -cold intolerance

      These are just some of the signs and symptoms... here's a page with more info:

      Hope that helps!

  41. QUESTION:
    has anybody gotten pregnant with no trouble having hypothyroidism and was not taking medicine to cure it?

    • ANSWER:
      Hyperthyroidism refers to the signs and symptoms which are due to the production of too much thyroid hormone. An overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism) often has its onset in younger women. Because a woman may think that feeling warm, having a hard or fast heartbeats, nervousness, trouble sleeping, or nausea with weight loss are just parts of being pregnant, the symptoms and signs of this condition may be overlooked during pregnancy.

      In women who are not pregnant, hyperthyroidism can affect menstrual periods, making them irregular, lighter, or disappear altogether. It may be harder for hyperthyroid women to become pregnant, and they are more likely to have miscarriages. If a woman with infertility or repeated miscarriages has symptoms of hyperthyroidism, it is important to rule out this condition with thyroid blood tests. It is very important that hyperthyroidism be controlled in pregnant women since the risks of miscarriage or birth defects are much higher without therapy. Fortunately, there are effective treatments available. Antithyroid medications cut down the thyroid gland's overproduction of hormones and are reviewed on another page on this site. When taken faithfully, they control hyperthyroidism within a few weeks. In pregnant women thyroid experts consider propylthiouracil (PTU) the safest drug. Because PTU can also affect the baby's thyroid gland, it is very important that pregnant women be monitored closely with examinations and blood tests so that the PTU dose can be adjusted. In rare cases when a pregnant woman cannot take PTU for some reason (allergy or other side effects), surgery to remove the thyroid gland is the only alternative and should be undertaken prior to or even during the pregnancy if necessary. Although radioactive iodine is a very effective treatment for other patients with hyperthyroidism, it should never be given during pregnancy because the baby's thyroid gland could be damaged.

      Because treating hyperthyroidism during pregnancy can be a bit tricky, it is usually best for women who plan to have children in the near future to have their thyroid condition permanently cured. Antithyroid medications alone may not be the best approach in these cases because hyperthyroidism often returns when medications is stopped. Radioactive iodine is the most widely recommended permanent treatment with surgical removal being the second (but widely used) choice. It is concentrated by thyroid cells and damages them with little radiation to the rest of the body. This is why it cannot be given to a pregnant woman, since the radioactive iodine could cross the placenta and destroy normal thyroid cells in the baby. The only common side effect of radioactive iodine treatment is underactivity of the thyroid gland, which occurs because too many thyroid cells were destroyed. This can be easily and safely treated with levothyroxine. There is no evidence that radioactive iodine treatment of hyperthyroidism interferes with a woman's future chances of becoming pregnant and delivering a healthy baby. For more information on the treatment options of hyperthyroidism see our page on this topic.

  42. QUESTION:
    I have Hoshimoto's hypothyroidism. Should I be worried about celiac disease?
    I have been going untreated for my thryroid disease for months now due to a lack of health coverage. Recently, I have been experiencing a loss of appetite, abdominal pain, nausea (no vomiting), and diarrhea. I have heard that there may be a link between celiac and hypothyroidism and am now concerned that I should be screened for celiac. Should I be worried or do I just have some kind of stomach bug?

    • ANSWER:
      A stomach bug doesn't last that long so if your symptoms continue then it is likely to be from another condition. These symptoms could be from Hashimoto's Thyroiditis itself, low vitamin B12 or magnesium levels which are commonly associated with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, or celiac's disease.

      "Relative risks of almost all other autoimmune diseases in Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis were significantly increased (>10 for pernicious anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, Addison's disease, celiac disease, and vitiligo)."

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20103030

      90% with hashimoto's has genetic defects with vitamin D absorption so the odds you have vitamin D deficiency is extremely high. Without vitamin D you cannot absorb calcium or magnesium effectively. Blood tests are recommended but of course if you cannot afford it, then my suggestions are: supplementing with vitamin B12 (sublingual - under the tongue), magnesium, calcium and vitamin D and go on a gluten free diet. A gluten free diet is shown to lower thyroid antibodies. Also, a must is selenium (about 4 brazil nuts a day). Selenium is shown in clinical trials to lower TPO thyroid antibodies.

      If you cannot afford supplementing, then increase your diet with magnesium, calcium and vitamin B12 rich foods and go out into the sun daily between 10 - 2 for about 20 minutes - no sunscreen which blocks UVB rays that create vitamin D. This said, if you have a deficiency this may not be enough. If you have autoimmune pernicious anaemia, then it is essential to take sublingual vitamin B12 to bypass the digestive tract.

      Hypothyroidism symptoms >>>
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/long-and-pathetic/

      The book: Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms? When My Lab Tests Are Normal goes into treating Hashimoto's Thyroiditis without drugs. >>>
      http://thyroidbook.com/

      Recommended lab work >>>
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/

      Optimal Lab Values–how to interpret your results >>>
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/lab-values/

      Selenium for Hashimoto's Thyroiditis >>>
      http://www.drdach.com/Selenium_Hashimotos.html

      Vitamin D >>>
      http://vitamindcouncil.org/

      Magnesium >>>
      http://www.fgb.com.au/natural-uses/magnesium-deficiency

      Vitamin B12 >>>
      http://vitamins.lovetoknow.com/Signs_of_Vitamin_B12_Deficiency

      The Celiac/Autoimmune Thyroid Connection >>>
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/latestresearch/a/celiac.htm

  43. QUESTION:
    I have been diagnosed as Melancholia. Has anyone else heard of this illness?
    Symptoms are: rapid weight loss, constant severe nausea, tremors and extreme depression.
    BTW, I lost 24 lbs in 4 weeks. I was so weak I couldn't walk without assistance.

    • ANSWER:
      It's an old term for depression. Ask yourself: "Why do I feel depressed, and when did I first start to feel this way: can I associate this with any recent change in my life?" (if so, it is probably reactive [situational] depression: counselling, such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy may be indicated, but most of life's adverse situations are resolved within 16 weeks, yet the medical criteria for depression, and the prescription of antidepressants is only 2 weeks!). Or, was it a more gradual thing, with no apparent cause? (a nutritional deficiency, hypothyroidism, environmental toxicity, or reactions to some medications, etc., becomes more likely as the cause). Antidepressants work quicker than the following; 2 - 6 weeks, but you may have to adjust dosage, or types. St. John's wort helps most people; tolerance doesn't develop, and the few side effects don't occur often, and even then are normally not severe (neither should be relied on as a sole treatment).

      It doesn't cause sleeping problems, or weight change, but usually takes at least 2, and generally 4 - 6 weeks to become effective, but can work quicker than antidepressants, sometimes. A recent, independent German double blind study showed it to be as effective as a commonly prescribed antidepressant, in cases of major depression, with far fewer side effects, and those were generally better tolerated, with a lower rate of discontinuation. Unlike antidepressants, where sexual dysfunction is a common side effect, it happens much more rarely with St. John's wort (I have noticed no effect in this area). A multidimensional approach to treating depression without medication follows. All except for no. (7.) are safe to use with medication, but not St. John's wort, because of interactions, and it's sensible to check out anything else first with your doctor.

      (1.) Take 4 Omega 3 fish oil supplements, daily: (certified free of mercury) it is best if consumed with an antioxidant, such as an orange, or grapefruit, or their FRESHLY SQUEEZED juice. If vitamin E is added, it should be certified as being 100% from natural sources, or it may be synthetic: avoid it. In the winter months, if not getting sufficient daily exposure to strong light, see http://www.mercola.com/ SEARCHBAR: enter: "vitamin D3", & Go to a doctor and ask for a 25(OH)D, also called 25-hydroxyvitamin D, blood test. When you get the results, don’t follow the typical “normal” reference range, as these are too low. The OPTIMAL value that you’re looking for is 45-52 ng/ml (115-128 nmol/l)". The company which tests your levels has to be one of those using the correct form of test, and this topic is addressed via the searchbar at mercola.com - "vitamin D3; testing". Also take a vitamin B complex which is certified as being 100% of natural origin; a deficiency in vitamin B9 (folic acid, or folate) is known to cause depression. Around 30% - 40% of depressed people have low vitamin B12 levels. Depressed females using the contraceptive pill may benefit from vitamin B6 supplements.

      (2.) Work up slowly to at least 20 minutes of exercise, or 30 - 60 mns, 5 times weekly in daytime, outside. Too much exercise can cause stress, which isn't wanted when dealing with depression. (3.) Occupational therapy (keeping busy allows little time for unproductive introspection, and keeps mental activity out of less desirable areas of the brain). (4.) Use daily, a relaxation method* and/or yoga*, and/or Tai Chi*.(5.) Initially, at least, some form of psychotherapy or counselling; later, perhaps either Cognitive Behavio(u)ral Therapy, (a free E course in it is at: http://moodgym.anu.edu.au/welcome ) or Rational Emotive Behavio(u)ral Therapy for, say, 6 months. (6.) Maintain a mood chart, and daily activities schedule**. (7.) As options, if desired, either a known, effective herbal remedy, such as St. John's wort, (get a German variety, if possible; local ones may vary in effectiveness. Perika, and Kira brands have been recommended as being effective. Take with a meal) or supplements, such as SAMe, or Inositol (from vitamin and health food stores, some supermarkets, or mail order: view section 55).

  44. QUESTION:
    Extreme fatigue, evening low grade fevers, swollen lymph nodes for months.?
    Antibiotics didn't help, I've lost a lot of weight, poor appetite, nausea that comes and goes, new allergies and gluten intolerance in addition to hypothyroidism. Also in the evenings my neck glands seem to swell and press on my throat. I don't have a sore throat, sneezing etc. Just the above symptoms. Should I ask my doc for a CT?

    • ANSWER:

  45. QUESTION:
    What Can Help You With Depression?
    Please share remmedies to help me with my depression problems like nausea,fatigue,and the rest of the symptoms that I have.(Mood changes)

    • ANSWER:
      Ask yourself: "Why do I feel depressed, and when did I first start to feel this way: can I associate this with any recent change in my life?" (if so, it is probably reactive [situational] depression: counselling, such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy may be indicated, but most of life's adverse situations are resolved within 16 weeks, yet the medical criteria for depression, and the prescription of antidepressants is only 2 weeks!). Or, was it a more gradual thing, with no apparent cause? (a nutritional deficiency, hypothyroidism, environmental toxicity, or reactions to some medications, etc., becomes more likely as the cause). Antidepressants work quicker than the following; 2 - 6 weeks, but you may have to adjust dosage, or types. St. John's wort helps most people; tolerance doesn't develop, and the few side effects don't occur often, and even then are normally not severe (neither should be relied on as a sole treatment).

      It doesn't cause sleeping problems, or weight change, but usually takes at least 2, and generally 4 - 6 weeks to become effective, but can work quicker than antidepressants, sometimes. A recent, independent German double blind study showed it to be as effective as a commonly prescribed antidepressant, in cases of major depression, with far fewer side effects, and those were generally better tolerated, with a lower rate of discontinuation. Unlike antidepressants, where sexual dysfunction is a common side effect, it happens much more rarely with St. John's wort (I have noticed no effect in this area). A multidimensional approach to treating depression without medication follows. All except for no. (7.) are safe to use with medication, but not St. John's wort, because of interactions, and it's sensible to check out anything else first with your doctor.

      (1.) Take 4 Omega 3 fish oil supplements, daily: (certified free of mercury) it is best if consumed with an antioxidant, such as an orange, or grapefruit, or their FRESHLY SQUEEZED juice. If vitamin E is added, it should be certified as being 100% from natural sources, or it may be synthetic: avoid it. In the winter months, if not getting sufficient daily exposure to strong light, see http://www.mercola.com/ SEARCHBAR: enter: "vitamin D3", & Go to a doctor and ask for a 25(OH)D, also called 25-hydroxyvitamin D, blood test. When you get the results, don’t follow the typical “normal” reference range, as these are too low. The OPTIMAL value that you’re looking for is 45-52 ng/ml (115-128 nmol/l)". The company which tests your levels has to be one of those using the correct form of test, and this topic is addressed via the searchbar at mercola.com - "vitamin D3; testing". Also take a vitamin B complex which is certified as being 100% of natural origin; a deficiency in vitamin B9 (folic acid, or folate) is known to cause depression. Around 30% - 40% of depressed people have low vitamin B12 levels. Depressed females using the contraceptive pill may benefit from vitamin B6 supplements.

      (2.) Work up slowly to at least 20 minutes of exercise, or 30 - 60 mns, 5 times weekly in daytime, outside. Too much exercise can cause stress, which isn't wanted when dealing with depression. (3.) Occupational therapy (keeping busy allows little time for unproductive introspection, and keeps mental activity out of less desirable areas of the brain). (4.) Use daily, a relaxation method* and/or yoga*, and/or Tai Chi*.(5.) Initially, at least, some form of psychotherapy or counselling; later, perhaps either Cognitive Behavio(u)ral Therapy, (a free E course in it is at: http://moodgym.anu.edu.au/welcome ) or Rational Emotive Behavio(u)ral Therapy for, say, 6 months. (6.) Maintain a mood chart, and daily activities schedule**. (7.) As options, if desired, either a known, effective herbal remedy, such as St. John's wort, (get a German variety, if possible; local ones may vary in effectiveness. Perika, and Kira brands have been recommended as being effective. Take with a meal) or supplements, such as SAMe, or Inositol (from vitamin and health food stores, some supermarkets, or mail order: view section 55).

  46. QUESTION:
    I'm worried about my moms health problems. Please help me?
    I'm worried about my moms health problems?

    So lately I've been worried about my mom and her health problems. She's been dizzy, and gets headaches all the time. She's always laying on the couch and can't do anything cause she'll get dizzy and have to sit down again. She sometimes gets nauseous but its rare, maybe once a week or every other week. She had a hysterectomy (uterus removed) in 2009. And these symptoms are on and off ever since then (not the nauseous part) she also had a blood clot in 2009 but she got treated for it and doesn't have it anymore. She recently got checked and her heart is healthy, and her lungs. But if the doctors say she is healthy then why is she feeling dizzy all the time? She also has a hard time sleeping at night and wakes up early in the morning. She gets anxious and nervous. Her heart sometimes beats fast and she has shortness of breath. Could she be depressed? Is that why she's feeling like this? Or could it be insomnia? Or something tragic? I need help understanding this. I feel like her doctor isn't helping her. It's all taking a toll on me. I feel bad, and helpless.

    • ANSWER:
      As you suspect depression is a strong possibility. The insomnia can be a part of it. But issues like nausea and headache can be part of a medical problem too. So it will be better if she is evaluated further for these symptoms.

      I feel some of these tests would help in revealing the cause of the symptoms.

      1. A thyroid function test (Hyper/hypothyroidism can cause these symptoms
      2. A detailed neurological examination and may a MRI of Brain. Increase cranial pressure can cause
      nausea and headaches.
      3.A ECG and Echocardiogram for assessing the function of heart.
      4.Routine Blood tests.

      Once these are done, you can safely rule out any serious trouble. If still the symptoms are persisting I would recommend her to get a Psychiatrists help.
      Wishing you a speedy recovery

  47. QUESTION:
    Whats wrong with me? i get thirsty really fast and i can't sleep, im gaining weight and i don't know why.?
    I'm thirsty like all the time, even after i drink something after 2 minutes im really thirsty.

    I also can't sleep, i wake up like 7 times each night and it bugs me.

    Every day my stomach hurts and i feel like im going to puke.

    I'm also gaining weight and i barely eat, i don't even eat lunch, and i go to the gym two times a week.

    Help, whats wrong with me?

    • ANSWER:
      I know it does sound like diabetes....but your symptoms also sound like you have adrenal fatigue aka low cortisol. And if you happen to be on a T4-only thyroid med--Synthroid or Levoxyl...bingo. Those are inadequate treatment for hypothyroidism, and as a result, your adrenals overwork to keep you going, and then become sluggish. That means you will have trouble staying asleep (due to high nighttime cortisol), and you'll have nausea in the face of stress (due to low cortisol), and being thirsty all the time is due to low aldosterone--an adrenal hormone. Low aldosterone also means you sweat easily, or go the bathroom alot at nighttime.

      Of.....even if you are not on the above meds, but have any family history of hypothyroidism...or have had someone suggest you have it, you may have gone a long time without being diagnosed...and now have adrenal fatigue.

      To be sure, visit this page: http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/adrenal-info It's from a patient-to-patient website by Thyroid Patient Activist Janie Bowthorpe, and she also have a good book by the same name with even more detail that you'll read on that page.

  48. QUESTION:
    My boyfriend is sick and we don't know what it is?
    He's been to the doctor several times and was told it is ~probably~ a stomach ulcer.
    He's been sick for 10 weeks

    His symptoms are:
    Nausea all the time, the degree of nausea does not remain constant, sometimes it's worse
    Weight loss, probably because he has trouble eating since he is so nauseous
    Hair loss, not balding though
    Sore, swollen throat
    Shallow breathing

    He has hypothyroidism and is clinically depressed on top of all that

    What could he be sick with?

    • ANSWER:
      Hard to say, but if he eats whole raw foods and exercises an hour a day if he can, even walking, it should improve him.
      Stay of drink [alcohol] fast food and chemicals.

  49. QUESTION:
    my cousin is has an ECG, and the doctor said that she has Borderline sinus and Body cardiac?
    what does it mean, i try to google it but its very confusing

    • ANSWER:
      Do you think the doctor actually said "borderline sinus bradycardia?"

      I don't know how old your cousin and normal heart rate varies by age. If your cousin is an adult, the normal heart rate would be between 60-100 beats per minute. Any heart rate below 60 beats per minute (generally between 40 and 60 bpm) is termed "bradycardia". The term "Sinus" means that the electrical conduction in the heart is originating in the sinoatrial node. This is normal. If your cousin has borderline sinus bradycardia, it would mean the her heart is functioning normally but is just beating at a slightly slower rate (maybe 50-59 beats per minute) . Sinus bradycardia is a normal response in some individuals to relaxation, sleeping, and is also commonly seen in trained athletes. This is a normal finding in some individuals and this might just be normal for her.

      If not, it could be caused by several factors including the following:
      1.) a vasovagal reaction seen with pain, nausea, vomiting, fright, or sudden stressful situations
      2.) sleep apnea syndrome
      3.) decreased metabolic rate (with hypothyroidism, hypothermia, hyperkalemia);
      4.) certain drugs like digitalis, calcium channel blockers, and beta blockers

      Sinus bradycardia doesn't require any treatment unless your cousin is experiencing symptoms such as low blood pressure, sweating, chest pain, decreased urine output, or confusion. If she does have symptoms, a doctor can administer Atropine to try to correct the slow heart rate. If that were unsuccessful, a pacemaker may be required.

      I hope this helps you!!

  50. QUESTION:
    Getting off paxil and adrenal exhaustion?
    is it common for someone to get adrenal exhaustion syndrome after getting off of paxil?

    • ANSWER:
      Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

      Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating and complex disorder characterized by profound fatigue that is not improved by bed rest and may be worsened by physical, emotional or mental stress. Patients report various nonspecific symptoms, including weakness, chemical sensitivities, allergies, poor immune function, muscle pain, impaired memory and/or mental concentration, insomnia, and post-exertional fatigue lasting more than 24 hours. In some cases, CFS can persist for years. The cause, or causes, of CFS have not been identified and no specific diagnostic tests are available. Moreover, since many illnesses have incapacitating fatigue as a symptom, care must be taken to exclude other known and often treatable conditions before a diagnosis of CFS is made.

      Diagnostic Criteria for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

      Major Criteria:
      1. new onset of fatigue causing 50% reduction in activity for at least six months
      2. exclusion of other illnesses that can cause fatigue

      Minor Criteria:
      1. presence of eight of 11 symptoms, or
      2. presence of six of 11 symptoms and two of three signs:

      Symptoms

      1. mild fever
      2. recurrent sore throat
      3. painful lymph nodes
      4. muscle weakness
      5. muscle pain
      6. migratory joint pain
      7. prolonged fatigue after exercise
      8. recurrent headaches
      9. neurological or psychological complaints, such as:

      • depression
      • excessive irritability
      • forgetfulness
      • sensitivity to bright light
      • confusion
      • inability to concentrate

      10. sleep disturbances
      11. sudden onset of symptom complex

      Signs

      1. low-grade fever
      2. non-exudative pharyngitis (sore throat)
      3. tender lymph nodes

      Similar Medical Conditions
      A number of illnesses have been described that have a similar spectrum of symptoms to CFS. These include fibromyalgia syndrome, myalgic encephalomyelitis, neurasthenia, multiple chemical sensitivities, and chronic mononucleosis. Although these illnesses may present with a primary symptom other than fatigue, chronic fatigue is commonly associated with all of them.

      Other Conditions That May Cause Similar Symptoms
      In addition, there are a large number of clinically defined, frequently treatable illnesses that can result in fatigue. Diagnosis of any of these conditions would exclude a definition of CFS unless the condition has been treated sufficiently and no longer explains the fatigue and other symptoms. These include hypothyroidism, sleep apnea and narcolepsy, major depressive disorders, chronic mononucleosis, bipolar affective disorders, schizophrenia, eating disorders, cancer, autoimmune disease, hormonal disorders*, subacute infections, obesity, alcohol or substance abuse, and reactions to prescribed medications.

      Other Commonly Observed Symptoms in CFS
      In addition to the eight primary defining symptoms of CFS, a number of other symptoms have been reported by some CFS patients. The frequencies of occurrence of these symptoms vary from 20% to 50% among CFS patients. They include abdominal pain, alcohol intolerance, bloating, chest pain, chronic cough, diarrhea, dizziness, dry eyes or mouth, earaches, irregular heartbeat, jaw pain, morning stiffness, nausea, night sweats, psychological problems (depression, irritability, anxiety, panic attacks), shortness of breath, skin sensations, tingling sensations, and weight loss.

      Possible Causes of CFS
      Due to weakened immunity, individuals with chronic fatigue have terrible problems with energy as well as reoccurring bouts with the flu, colds, sinusitis, and other immune problems. As with so many complex chronic illnesses, CFS may be aggravated by a wide variety of environmental and physiological challenges. Food allergies, environmental sensitivities (odors), heavy metal toxicity (mercury, aluminum, etc.), yeast overgrowth, parasites, and vitamin/mineral deficiencies can all contribute to CFS.

      The cause, or causes, of CFS remain unknown despite a vigorous search. While a single cause for CFS may yet be identified, another possibility is that CFS represents a common endpoint of disease resulting from multiple precipitating causes. As such, it should not be assumed that any of the possible causes listed below has been formally excluded, or that these largely unrelated possible causes are mutually exclusive. Conditions that have been proposed to trigger the development of CFS include virus infection or other transient traumatic conditions, stress, and toxins.

      General Theories
      Unfortunately, some physicians believe that CFS is a component of a psychological disorder or a symptom of other problems, similar to anemia and high blood pressure. Indeed, no primary cause has been found that explains all cases of CFS. A number of experts believe that CFS is caused by a combination of conditions that overwhelm the person’s stress coping abilities. These conditions or triggers may include the following:

      • Genetic factors.
      • Brain abnormalities or inability of the self-regulating mechanisms.
      • A hyper-reactive immune system.
      • Viral, bacterial, fungal, mycoplasma or other infectious agents.
      The majority of patients report some preceding moderate to serious physical (eg, a chronic viral infection) or emotional event (eg, episode of depression). Some experts theorize that such events alone or in combination coupled in people with certain neurological and genetic abnormalities may overwhelm the person’s ability regulate their own homeostatic self-regulating systems.

      Dysfunction of the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis
      Researchers investigating CFS are looking at the abnormalities in the brain system known as the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. This system produces or regulates hormones and brain chemicals that control important functions, including sleep, response to stress, and depression. This is our self-regulating, homeostatic system. Stress Hormone

      Deficiencies
      A number of studies on CFS patients have observed deficiencies in cortisol levels, a stress hormone produced in the hypothalamus. Deficiencies may be the reason why CFS patients have an impaired and weaker response to psychological or physical stresses (such as infection or exercise).

      Abnormalities in Neurotransmitters
      Other research has reported that some patients with CFS have abnormally high levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter (chemical messenger in the brain). Such elevated levels in the brain are associated with fatigue. Yet another study reported that deficiencies in dopamine and norepinephrine, other important neurotransmitters, may play a role in CFS.

      Infections
      Because most of the features of CFS resemble those of a lingering viral illness, many researchers have focused on the possibility that a virus or some other infectious agent causes the syndrome in some cases.

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