Symptom Of Underactive Thyroid In Children

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can underactive thyroid affect the ability to get prego?
    If you have an underactive thyroid can that affect your ability to become prego? It is hereditary for women in my family after the birth of their frist child. I have a daughter and we r TTC again. I am wondering if this can/will be a factor in our ability to concieve quickly?
    Also in case its a factor, I am not taking any medication for it at the moment.

    • ANSWER:
      You definately need to be checked if you think you might have an underactive thyroid. It does make it harder to get pregnant, and if by chance you do get pregnant without treatment , they are finding links to pregnant women with untreated underactive thyroid (HYPO-thyroidism) to brain under-development during gestation to later learning disabilities.

      It took me a year to concieve with untreated hypothyroidism, (normally I concieve very easily. ) My levels were still within normal even though I was having symptoms (no periods for months and months before I concieved.) This was in the 90s. So the Dr. didn't medicate me. My son has learning problems, had speech delays, ect. Finally when I started losing hair and my levels were still on the edge of normal I started taking meds and my cycles are now perfect 28 day cycles. It makes a big difference. Be careful and Good luck.

  2. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of a thyroid diorder in a child age 9?
    My daughter's tyroid seem enlarged and I was curious if she may have an underactive thyroid. She had gained weight in the last year.
    And what causes thyroid problems

    • ANSWER:
      o poor memory and concentration
      o tiredness & fatigue
      o depression
      o irritability
      o weight gain
      o muscle weakness and cramps
      o intolerance to cold weather
      o deteriorating or slowing growth rate
      o constipation
      o dry, coarse, itchy skin
      o brittle hair
      o a croaky, hoarse voice
      o slow reflexes
      o slow heart rate
      o delayed as well as precocious sexual development
      o high cholesterol levels
      o girls may suffer from increased menstrual flow

      NB: children and adolescents with under activity of the thyroid may have almost no symptoms or signs other than weight gain or slowing growth.

  3. QUESTION:
    What are the most common treatment methods for thyroid problems?
    My docotor is testing my blood for thyroid problems, and I would like to know what treatments they may suggest if I do have any problems. Also, what are the possible issues with my thyroid that they may be checking for? Signs and symptoms? Not sure if this makes a difference, but I am a 22 yr old female - two children/c-section.

    • ANSWER:
      FIRST THING~ If your doctor won't listen to YOU, get a new one! YOU KNOW when your body is good & when it's not! I refuse to listen to someone who won't listen to me...because they think they know it all since they "went to school for the degree". Well, they didn't go to school & study MY BODY! So, get a new doc, and don't feel bad about it. What if something bad happened to you? Would you hesitate to let that doc know at that point? DON"T LET IT GET THERE!
      I have given several links below to read & perhaps you can read through & understand the different thyroid symptoms & problems.
      Here is some information about myself, plus some symptoms since you seemed to be interested:
      I have low thyroid. I've had it for 10 years. I got it after I had my second child at about the age of 25. If you have low thyroid...here's a great question to answer: Can you see the floor of your house? That was what was asked of me at one point, and to my amazement, the answer was no!
      My signs are: messy house, no desire to do anything...go anywhere, spend time with my kids or my guy, sleep a lot, hard to keep my eyes open at times, HUGE weight gain that over the past years have not found an easy way to take off...so I give up a lot, I have terribly dry hair & don't wash it a lot so it stays strong, I have bumps on my face...not like pimples, but I think it's from dry skin, and perhaps some others that I can't remember at this time...that's another symptom--forgetfullness.
      Here are the "GENERAL" signs for most people: fatigue and lack of energy. Women suffering from underactive thyroid experience heavier menstrual periods. Sluggishness and forgetfulness are symptoms of underactive thyroid problem. Other symptoms of this thyroid disorder are dry skin and hair and constipation.
      If you have high thyroid, or an overactive one, the signs are: increased body metabolism. This is followed by weight loss and excessive warmth and sweating. Persons suffering from overactive thyroid experience trembling hands, irritability and rapid heartbeat or palpitations. Women with overactive thyroid or hyperthyroidism may experience shorter or lighter menstrual periods.
      I take medication, and sadly will have to take 1 pill everyday for the rest of my life. There's a blood check that they will do to see if you have low or high. I hope i've helped you!!

  4. QUESTION:
    Is it possible that I have a thyroid problem?
    I am drastically overweight and have never been at a healthy weight since I was a child. I always thought it was due to poor eating habits and the likes, but now that I'm trying to lose weight, I find it practically impossible. I diet the best that I can and I run miles everyday, but I just can't lose weight. I tried weight watchers and in about 9 months I only managed to lose a total of like 10 pounds.

    I am just wondering if it's possilbe that I have a thyroid problem and what are the other symptoms?

    I wanted to find out what the main symptoms are before I go running to my doctor for nothing.
    What are the other symptoms of thyroid diseases?

    I promise that I didn't cheat on Weight Watchers because my mother and me ate the same things and she lost weight a whole lot easier.

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of an underactive thyroid are; weight gain, difficulty losing weight with diet & exercise, fatigue, depression, dry skin, dry thinning hair, muscle and jont aches, headaches, sensitivity to light, low body temp, low blood pressure, IBS with constipation, slep apnea, fertility problems, mood changes, ridged fingernails with no moons, cold feet &/or hands, outr part of eyebrow is missing, slow heart rate, and increased cholesterol levels.

      Testing is a simple blood test. I advise you though to only test first thing in the morning and to find out the number result. Most likely they will do a TSH. A TSH over 2.0 shows the gland is slowly down and treatment should begin with a TSH of 3.0 according to AACE.

  5. QUESTION:
    How long for low thyroid meds to work?
    How long does it take to notice effects of "Synthroid" to treat my low thyroid? What can I expect? Thanks for your input.

    • ANSWER:
      Here is some information about myself, plus some symptoms in case anyone coming upon your question may be interested. I have also given several links below to read & perhaps you can read through & understand the different thyroid symptoms & problems.
      I have low thyroid. I have had it for 10 years. I came about after I had my second child. Most people can do well, but myself, if I even miss a day or two, I get super tired, and VERY cranky. My body literally ate up my thyroid...it's almost non-existent. I am on 300mg of levoxyrothin.
      If you have low thyroid...here's a great question to answer: Can you see the floor of your house? That was what was asked of me at one point, and to my amazement, the answer was no!
      Anyway, the signs are:fatigue and lack of energy. Women suffering from underactive thyroid experience heavier menstrual periods. Sluggishness and forgetfulness are symptoms of underactive thyroid problem. Other symptoms of this thyroid disorder are dry skin and hair and constipation.
      If you have high thyroid, or an overactive one, the signs are: increased body metabolism. This is followed by weight loss and excessive warmth and sweating. Persons suffering from overactive thyroid experience trembling hands, irritability and rapid heartbeat or palpitations. Women with overactive thyroid or hyperthyroidism may experience shorter or lighter menstrual periods.
      I take medication, and sadly will have to take 1 pill everyday for the rest of my life. There's a blood check that they will do to see if you have low or high. I hope i've helped you!!

  6. QUESTION:
    What are the chances this is something serious?
    I am a 14 y.o. girl and i have Hoshimoto's disease. ive been taking medication almost as long as i can remember for it and i go in for my annual checkup. today i went and she found a nodule on my thyroid and im freaked out..what if its serious and its cancer? what are the chances that it is?
    PS. a month ago i had an achy feeling in my throid and iver summer i play lacrosse and i got hit in the throat with the ball really hard.

    • ANSWER:
      Catching a lacrosse ball in the throat had to have hurt big time. I got hit with a lacrosse ball near the top of my thigh once. I was lame for days. I would have had to go to the doctor, but Dad was a sports trainer and knew what to do. It's likely the bruising to your thyroid has caused a small nodule.

      From the Mayo clinic.

      Complications
      By Mayo Clinic staff

      Left untreated, an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) caused by Hashimoto's disease can lead to a number of health problems:

      Goiter. Constant stimulation of your thyroid to release more hormones may cause the gland to become enlarged, a condition known as goiter. Hypothyroidism is one of the most common causes of goiter. Although generally not uncomfortable, a very large goiter can affect your appearance and may interfere with swallowing or breathing.
      Heart problems. Hashimoto's disease also may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, primarily because high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol — the "bad" cholesterol — can occur in people with an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism). If left untreated, hypothyroidism can lead to an enlarged heart and, in rare cases, heart failure.
      Mental health issues. Depression may occur early in Hashimoto's disease and may become more severe over time. Hashimoto's disease can also cause sexual desire (libido) to decrease in both men and women and can lead to slowed mental functioning.
      Myxedema (mik-suh-DEE-muh). This rare, life-threatening condition can develop due to long-term hypothyroidism as a result of untreated Hashimoto's disease. Its signs and symptoms include intense cold intolerance and drowsiness followed by profound lethargy and unconsciousness. A myxedema coma may be triggered by sedatives, infection or other stress on your body. Myxedema requires immediate emergency medical treatment.
      Birth defects. Babies born to women with untreated hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto's disease may have a higher risk of birth defects than do babies born to healthy mothers. Doctors have long known that these children are more prone to intellectual and developmental problems. There may be a link between hypothyroid pregnancies and birth defects, such as cleft palate. A connection also exists between hypothyroid pregnancies and heart, brain and kidney problems in infants. If you're planning to get pregnant or if you're in early pregnancy, be sure to have your thyroid level checked.

      Nowhere does it reference a link between Hashimoto's disease and thyroid cancer.

  7. QUESTION:
    Can an out of control menstrual cycle cause weight gain?
    Also what is the best "fix" for a period that is out of control? Here's the details. When I had my second child my period for a bit went haywire, I gained 30 pounds, but after a bit it went back to normal and I lost the weight. Now after my 3rd child I am having the same problem. When my son was 6 months old, my period started getting bad again and shortly after I started gaining weight. He's now 5 yrs old and my period has never went back to normal and I have gained over 50 lbs. My weight should be about 120 and I weigh about 170. About 6 months ago I went on Yaz and my period went to normal. I lost 24lbs. Due to problems with the pill, I had to quit taking them. My periods went back to coming every 2 wks and I bleed very very heavily. I have also gained back the 24lbs I lost. I have talked to my ob gyn and she says it is not possible for my periods to cause weight gain. Is it time to see another dr?
    I have tried both diet and exercise. Many diets. I have also consulted a nutritionist and a trainer. Neither worked.

    • ANSWER:
      hi romancenwva

      Yes, I would definitely consider seeing another doctor. You might try to find a doctor that has more of a wholistic approach and who better understands the interrelationships between all the hormones in the body.

      The first thing that came to mind for me when I read your question was THYROID. Your doctor may have already tested it and decided it was "normal" but the reference range for TSH is very much in dispute, and it takes more than just that one number to thoroughly rule it out.

      As I'm sure you know, underactive thyroid can contribute to weight gain. Did you know that pregnancy can cause thyroid problems? It happens most often in women with thyroid antibodies---which means one of the autoimmune versions of thyroiditis. Graves, is the hyper version, Hashimoto's is the hypo version. However, those terms may be meaningless. Some researchers have suggested that they are just two aspects of the same disease.

      http://cpmcnet.columbia.edu/dept/thyroid/pregnant.html

      "Postpartum thyroid disease can be an overactive thyroid, an underactive thyroid or both. Since many of the symptoms of thyroid disease are subtle and often overlap with the postpartum experiences of healthy women, the diagnosis of thyroid disease is often not considered. Symptoms include anxiety, insomnia, difficulty concentrating, irritability, weight changes or fatigue, which are common after delivery, even when thyroid disease is not present."

      If your thyroid turns out to be the culprit, keep after your doctors to make sure you're not being undertreated. They will often use the TSH reading to determine that you're just inside the "normal" range and say you're cured. Other physicians will treat based more on symptoms than on numbers.

      Below are some links that you might find useful. Feel free to email me.

      Best of luck!

  8. QUESTION:
    What are some of the main issues and complications involving PCOS and Diabex?
    I have recently been diagnosed with PCOS and I have been craving really bad foods with the medication I am on, then I feel really sick after wards. Are these to do with the PCOS, or the meds? Or is there something else wrong? Could you please also leave a list of other things that PCOS can create or show? Ta.

    • ANSWER:
      I recommend optimizing vit.D levels & starting a low carb lifeplan. If you consider low carb, notify your doctor, meds may need to be lowered or eliminated.

      I highly recommend a fat based diet to maximize health & balance hormones. All carbs >9g per hour trigger insulin.

      Insulin is considered the "bully" hormone. While it dominates the bloodstream, other hormones aren't allowed to function properly, especially sex hormones & human growth hormone. This creates a major imbalance in the body which creates a lot of defenses that we call symptoms (excess fat accumulation, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high cholesterol, etc.)

      This is an example of items founds in a high fat diet - I don't recommend this as the sole source of foods but with the addition of eggs, dairy, vegetables & cold water fish (sardines, mackerel, herring or salmon) - it would be much closer to ideal.

      1750 calories 23g of net carbs (65g of fiber) & 80% of total calories from fat-

      3oz sunflower seeds
      3oz chia seeds
      1oz flax seeds
      2oz almonds
      1oz Brazil nuts
      2oz Olives
      half avocado

      They don't know if insulin resistance creates PCOS or if PCOS creates insulin resistance. I believe it's just another side effect of insulin dysfunction. Long term ingestion of refined carbs "burn out" the insulin receptors on muscle cells, so calories go directly to fat cells, leaving muscle cells screaming for nutrition.

      Most people get overweight because their bodies just can't process carbs any more. They become insulin resistant & carbs go straight to fat cells. Fat storage is a symptom of the disease state. When your muscles become insulin resistant, then calories go directly to fat cells instead of to glycogen stores & you become overweight fast. It's nearly impossible to lose weight at this point without minimizing carbs because the body no longer is able to process carbs. The body won't release fat stores until the blood stream is free of insulin. In someone insulin resistant, the insulin response is too sensitive & produces too much insulin.

      As healthy as fruit may be, it just doesn't promote fat loss. Fructose, the sugar in most fruits is the most lipogenic (fat producing) carb & creates triglycerides which "trap" fat in fat cells.

      Type 2 diabetes used to be called adult onset diabetes because it was rare that people had it til they were in their 50s. They had to change the name because now it's common in children. Now they add high fructose corn syrup to infant formula & we have an epidemic of obese 6mo old infants who become diabetic as children.

      The whole purpose of carbohydrates is to put the body in fat storage mode so we can gain as much fat as possible to survive winter & famine. Carbs trigger an insatiable appetite so you can eat as much as is available. Carbs were only suppose to be available during harvest season, not year around.

      The body doesn't "need" carbs for energy. Carbs may provide quick energy but fats provide sustained energy. A low carb diet is a high fat diet, protein shouldn't be more than 30% of daily calories on any diet & preferably 20%. Coconut oil is the only fat to provide quick energy like a carb (but without the rise in blood sugar or insulin).

      Dr.Broda Barnes suggested that for someone with thyroid dysfunctions to never go below 1500 calories or 30g of net carbs per day - otherwise the thyroid could be harmed further.

      The Barnes Basal Temperature Test (BBTT)is a simple test anyone can undertake at home in order to assess their thyroid function. It is most often used to detect undiagnosed hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) but will also provide evidence of hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid).

      I highly recommend 1 oz. (about 4) canned (or fresh) oysters every day for the naturally occurring zinc (170% DV) & 90% DV of vitamin B12 as well as getting 1g a week in Omega 3 fatty acids, EPA/DHA. Animal studies show that zinc deficiency is associated with decreased serum T3 levels. Zinc may play a role in thyroid hormone metabolism in patients with low T3 and may contribute to conversion of T4 to T3 in humans.

      PCOS forum -

      http://forum.lowcarber.org/forumdisplay.php?f=46

      Vitamin D deficiency may contribute to the wide set of disorders associated with metabolic syndrome (syndrome X), as well as to PCOS. In a study published in 2004, the authors saw a 60% improvement in insulin sensitivity in healthy, vitamin D replete adults

      http://www.womentowomen.com/healthynutrition/vitamind.aspx

  9. QUESTION:
    How does Thryriod Disease occur? Is it natural from when you are born or does it occur sometime during life?
    Please It's really important that I know this, for my research paper!

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid basics
      What is the thyroid gland?
      The thyroid gland is a soft, small, bow-shaped gland, which is located in the neck, below the voice box, or larynx.

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Thyroid function
      The thyroid gland is part of the endocrine system and produces the hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), which regulate the rate of metabolism. The thyroid gland is controlled by the hypothalamus and pituitary glands at the base of the brain.

      TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone), which is secreted by the pituitary gland, travels through the blood to stimulate the production of thyroxine from your thyroid gland.

      T4 controls your metabolism. If there is not enough T4, your body will slow and become hypothyroid. If you have too much T4, your body will speed up and become hyperthyroid

      As T4 has an influence over every cell in your body, you will notice changes.
      T4 also controls growth of the brain in the foetus and linear growth (height) in children.

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      What causes thyroid disease?
      There are many possible causes of thyroid disease. These include:

      •iodine deficiency
      •autoimmune disease
      •an imbalance in T4 production
      •nodules which have formed on the gland
      •benign and malignant (cancer) tumours of the thyroid

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Is thyroid disease common?
      One in 7 Australians will be diagnosed with some form of thyroid disease and women are five times more likely than men to develop a thyroid condition. Thyroid disease, especially hypothyroidism – or an underactive thyroid – becomes more common as we grow older.

      Iodine deficiency has re-emerged in Australia and we can expect more people to suffer from swelling and enlargement of the thyroid gland, also known as ‘goitre’.

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Diagnosing thyroid disease
      Thyroid disease can be difficult to diagnose, due to many symptoms being similar to those of other conditions. Your doctor may:

      •palpate, or feel, your neck for any sign of swelling
      •check your heart rate and blood pressure
      •run blood tests for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH),T4 and T3, antithyroglobulin (anti-Tg) antibodies and antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) antibodies
      •use thyroid ultrasound to measure the size, shape and texture of the gland and to detect any nodules that may be present
      •perform a CT scan to measure thyroid function
      •use fine needle biopsy to diagnose nodules or identify tissue change

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Treating thyroid disease
      Thyroid disease generally requires lifelong management. Your GP may refer you to an endocrinologist, who is a thyroid specialist. Regular blood tests and ultrasound scans may be necessary to monitor your thyroid function or thyroid hormone levels.

  10. QUESTION:
    What causes stiffness and tightness in the entire upper abdomen upto the ribs?can this lead to breathlessness?
    Also, I had my cardio tests plus a chest x ray and entire abdominal sonography in the month of October, all results were normal, still I have chest pains, stiffness and tightness.
    I have a constant fear of having a heart attack or a severe problem related to my lungs. I have developed this fear for almost 4 months.

    Should I repeat all the tests again??

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Abdominal Muscle Spasms
      Overworked muscles: Unfamiliar exercise or frequent strenuous activity can cause the abdominal muscles to spasm. This happens because the muscle is being overused, resulting in the muscle's energy loss . This loss of energy causes it to contract suddenly, resulting in muscle spasms. This contraction of the muscle may involve the muscle in totality or only a specific part of it. People who are more at risk of developing muscle spasms due to this reason are athletes, an individual who exercises frequently or has just started exercising, or someone in an occupation that requires vigorous exertion such as construction workers. The exercise that will most likely cause abdominal muscle spasms to manifest is crunches or sit-ups. A muscle can also become overworked with normal daily activities such as shoveling snow, mowing the lawn, or raking grass.

      Dehydration: If the muscles are depleted in water and electrolytes, muscle spasms can occur. This is because proteins in the muscles require a certain amount of water, glucose, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. When these substances are low, their normal function becomes abnormal, which sometimes results in abdominal muscle spasms.

      Kidney Stones: This is an abnormal mass that is present in either the kidneys or urinary tract. This mass is comprised of hard crystalline mineral material. There are a number of factors that contribute to the formation of a kidney stone. These include a decrease in urine volume, excess in a specific substance in the urine, and dehydration. Kidney stones can cause severe pain in the abdomen, back, or groin. This sporadic pain may feel like cramps or muscle spasms. This means the severity of the pain will change frequently, being mild at one instance while unbearable at the next. Other accompanying symptoms include nausea, vomiting, blood in the urine, difficulties urinating, penile pain, and testicular pain.

      Black widow spider bite: A bite from this highly venomous spider can cause abdominal muscle spasms. The first sign of a bite will be the actual bite itself. Given the severe pain induced by this bite, you will be aware of its presence. The other symptoms will manifest in 20-60 minutes after the bite has occurred. The spider's venom affects the victim's nervous system, which results in severe muscle cramps or spasms in the abdomen, shoulder, or back. Nausea, vomiting, chest pain, dizziness, fainting, and weakness sometimes follow. The severity of the spider bite reaction is dependent upon the victim's age and health. Children and the elderly are more at risk of developing a severe reaction to the spider's venom.

      Hypothyroidism: The thyroid is a gland located in the neck that has the function of regulating metabolism hormones. Hypothyroidism is an underactive thyroid that is not producing enough hormones. Muscle spasms, aches, and tenderness are symptomatic of this medical condition. Other symptoms include fatigue, constipation, sensitivity to the cold, pale skin, hoarse voice, weight gain, brittle nails, and depression. If abdominal muscle spasms coincide with any of these symptoms, then you may have hypothyroidism.

      Other more rare causes of abdominal muscle spasms are diverticulitis, intussusception, hernia, cholecystitis, and bowel obstruction.
      good luck and God bless you

  11. QUESTION:
    How can I combat reactive depression caused by overactive thyroid?
    I have hyperthyroid which in turn leads to reacitve depression.
    I literally feel like im loosing my mind and do really irrational things that put a strain on my long term relationship
    I get very paronoid, and cry alot
    what can i do (aside from go to the Gp)?

    • ANSWER:
      When This Gland Goes Haywire, Watch Out
      Julie Amato of Simsbury, Conn., had been a high-energy person. "I ran five to seven miles a day and was always the one to say 'Go, go, go.'"

      But things changed after the birth of her first child, and Amato, 35, felt "horrible. My hands and feet were always cold. My periods were much heavier, and I had so little energy that just getting up the stairs was a major effort. I thought I was dying."

      Finally she saw a doctor "who took one look at me and said, 'It's your thyroid.'" A blood test confirmed Amato was hypothyroid - her thyroid gland was underactive, producing too little thyroid hormone. With daily treatment her energy level has gradually increased."

      Ann Maltz, 37, of Houston was also a new mother. "I was jittery, my hair was falling out, I wasn't sleeping and my heart seemed to be racing," she remembers. Like Amato - and many other women - Maltz blamed the stress of motherhood.

      One day, while she was going downstairs, her legs slid out from under her. She was too weak to stand. From the swollen appearance of her neck, Maltz's physician suspected a thyroid problem. Tests confirmed it: Her thyroid was on fast-forward, producing too much hormone. Maltz now feels fine after treatment for hyperthyroidism.

      "AFTER diabetes, thyroid disease is the most common glandular disorder," says Dr. Martin Surks, head of endocrinology at New York City's Montefiore Hospital. At least 11 million North Americans - one million of them Canadians - are being treated for thyroid conditions, usually an underactive (hypo-) or overactive (hyper-) gland.

      Because some early symptoms are easily ignored or mistaken for signs of anxiety disorders or aging, millions of cases of thyroid disease remain undiagnosed. "Some patients go from doctor to doctor for years complaining of irritability, heart palpitations, difficulty concentrating, even memory problems, before they finally get help," says neuropsychologist Robert Stern, director of neurobehavioural research at Rhode Island Hospital in Providence.

      Women are four times as likely as men to develop thyroid problems, probably because they're more prone to the malfunction that underlies the majority of cases. Essentially, their immune systems, failing to recognize the thyroid gland as part of the body, send antibodies to attack it.

      The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of the neck over the trachea, or windpipe. Its job is to extract iodine from blood to produce two hormones - thyroxine and triiodothyronine - that regulate the energy use of virtually every cell and organ in the body. When your thyroid becomes underactive or overactive, here's what to watch for - and do.

      UNDERACTIVE glands are twice as prevalent as overactive ones. The most common cause of hypothyroidism is an autoimmune disorder called Hashimoto's disease, named for the Japanese physician who first recognized it in 1912.

      In addition, five to eight percent of women develop hypothyroidism soon after giving birth. While this pregnancy-related condition is usually temporary and often doesn't require treatment, some new mothers may need to take thyroid hormone indefinitely.

      Radiation therapy to the head or neck, pituitary tumours, or certain drugs, such as lithium for psychiatric ailments and the heart drug amiodarone (Cordarone), can also lead to hypothyroidism.

      Whatever the cause, an underactive thyroid leaves the body running in slow motion. Changes may include fatigue, feeling cold, diminished concentration and memory, and weight gain.

      In time the symptoms become worse: dry skin and brittle nails, constipation, muscle aches or cramps, slow heart rate and, in women, longer menstrual periods with heavier flow. Because the disease brings about irregular ovulation, untreated women may have trouble conceiving and have a higher-than-normal rate of miscarriage and premature delivery.

      Depression also results from hypothyroidism. Up to 20 percent of all chronic-depression cases may be associated with low production of thyroid hormones. A University of North Carolina study found that among women with mildly decreased thyroid function, the rate of those who had suffered depression at least once in their lives was almost three times as great (56 percent versus 20 percent) as among those with normal thyroid function. Often, unfortunately, patients who are treated for depression do not first get thyroid tests.

      There's no way to cure an underactive thyroid, but treatment can be as simple as a pill-a-day lifetime hormone replacement. Determining the right medication and dose, though, may require experimenting. Too much thyroid hormone increases risk of bone loss, osteoporosis and cardiac arrhythmia; too little can lead to mild high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol levels.

      Sometimes treatment for an underactive thyroid may even create the symptoms of hyperthyroidism and vice versa. A San Jose, Calif., woman was told she had Hashimoto's disease, and a synthetic thyroid hormone was prescribed. "One day," she says, "my heart started racing and my head was pounding. I thought I was having a stroke." It turned out that the dose was too high and brought on symptoms of hyperthyroidism. Now that her dosage has been adjusted, she is fine.

      "Even a small medication mistake may have consequences, especially if you become hypothyroid at 25 or 30 and aren't checked at least yearly to make sure the dose is right," says endocrinologist Reed Larsen, chief of the thyroid division at Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital.

      The main cause of an overactive gland is another autoimmune disorder, Graves' disease, named for the 19th-century Irish physician who was one of the first to describe it.

      Symptoms are the flip side of hypothyroidism: rapid heartbeat, nervousness and irritability, feeling hot, muscle weakness, softening of the nails, hair loss, more frequent bowel movements, weight loss despite eating as usual, and, for women, shorter menstrual periods with lighter flow. Although some Graves' patients feel supercharged and wired, they may at the same time feel weak and wiped out.

      Many people affected by hyperthyroidism also develop eye problems, including redness, irritation, dryness or swelling. For a small percentage of patients, symptoms include increased pressure on the optic nerve or tissue buildup behind the eyes, causing bulging from the sockets. "It's like having size-ten eyes in size-seven sockets," says Nancy Patterson, executive director of the U.S. National Graves' Disease Foundation.

      Treating an overactive thyroid can also be tricky. There are three alternatives: radioactive iodine to disable the gland, drugs to turn off excess hormone production, or surgery to remove the thyroid, followed by hormone replacement. Most doctors recommend radioactive iodine. For about 90 percent of patients, this treatment also involves the use of thyroid hormones to bring levels back to normal.

      Since Graves' disease can go into remission, a doctor may decide to try other drugs instead. In about five percent of cases, however, the medications cause side effects, including a rash, low-grade fever or joint aches.

      Surgery is usually reserved for hyperthyroid patients who have a large, disfiguring goiter (enlargement of the thyroid) that is not likely to shrink with other treatment and, in some cases, for women with the condition who are either pregnant or who plan to become pregnant. Although the operation is generally safe, there's a small risk of injury to the parathyroid glands (four tiny glands adjacent to the thyroid) or vocal cords.

      Blood tests can diagnose thyroid disorders. The most sensitive test measures thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), secreted by the pituitary gland. When the thyroid is underactive, TSH levels will be high; low TSH levels signal an overactive thyroid.

      A proper thyroid test measures both TSH and the principal thyroid hormone, thyroxine. There are also blood tests for the antibodies found in Hashimoto's and Graves' diseases.

      Unless you have a thyroid nodule - a distinct lump on an otherwise normal gland - further testing may not be necessary. Although thyroid cancer is rare (about 1,100 Canadian cases a year), a nodule might be cancerous, and for this reason a scan, sonogram or biopsy is appropriate. A history of radiation exposure, especially to the head or neck, is a primary risk factor for thyroid cancer.

  12. QUESTION:
    I went to the doctor and found out I had a underactive thyroid (hypo) what do they do to treat it?
    My doctor sent me to a specialist and I have a appt. this week to go about it, has anyone had this problem?I have a lump in my throat and the right side which is the thyroid it is swelling, so I am just wondering if you know what they will do about it. The doctor told me I will have to take medication for it the rest of my life. I am a 23 year old female and I am also borderline anemic. I weigh 98 pounds, which I have always been small all my life. I have a 3 year old, and I still haven't gainned any weight from having a child. I am under alot of stress adn the doctor to ld me I have a rapid heartbeat also, so I don't know if that has to do with you stress or with the thyroid. I am really worried as to what they will do. Please if anyone has delt with a hyp underactive thyroid before please tell me as to what you had to do to treat it. thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      If it is underactive thyroid then they work up with many hormonal studies then find that it is only underactive thyroid then they treat with external thyroid hormones to provide normal metabolic function in your body by providing sufficient thyroid hormones.
      If your thyroid is enlarged and it is producing cosmetic or pressure symptoms in neck then surgeon removes the extra thyroid.

  13. QUESTION:
    Does Fluoride in drinking water prevent tooth decay?
    Its for my GCSE coursework, can't i have a lot of details please.. don't know what to research completely!

    • ANSWER:
      No, it does not "prevent" tooth decay but it will help to delay tooth decay due to the fluoride-induced hypothyroidism that occurs, which delays the eruption of children's teeth. It is a statistical illusion. This was admitted by the father of fluoridation himself in court, while under oath. (H. Trendley Dean).

      H. Trendley Dean, DDS, ("father of fluoridation"), the original promoter of water fluoridation as an effective tool in fighting dental decay, admitted over 60 years ago under oath, that his evidence purporting to prove the fluoridation hypothesis was not valid. Trendley Dean admitted under oath on a witness stand that his early data gave ZERO evidence that increasing fluoride concentration in the water supply reduced tooth decay.

      To paraphrase Dean's findings, "As children's teeth disintegrate, they may have fewer cavities".

      (H. Trendley Dean: Proceedings, City of Oroville vs. Public Utilities Commission of the State of California, Oroville, California, Oroville, California, October 20-21, 1955.)... also... (See 4-1: "Fluoridation Benefits - Statistical Illusion." Testimony of Konstantin K. Paluev, Research and Development Engineer, Mar. 6, 1957).

      According to a clinical study by Galletti and Joyet (1958), the thyroid function of hyperthyroid patients was reduced at just 2.3-4.5 mg per day of fluoride. To put this finding in perspective, the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS, 1991) has estimated that total fluoride exposure in fluoridated communities ranges from 1.6 to 6.6 mg/day. This is a remarkable fact, particularly considering the rampant and increasing problem of hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) in the United States and other fluoridated countries. Symptoms of hypothyroidism include depression, fatigue, weight gain, muscle and joint pains, increased cholesterol levels, and heart disease. In 2010, the second most prescribed drug of the year was Synthroid (sodium levothyroxine) which is a hormone replacement drug used to treat an underactive thyroid. Fluoride is a halogen, just like iodine. But, fluoride is not a nutrient. Iodine is. Fluoride will displace iodine from the iodine receptors of the thyroid gland and body which may lead to hypothyroidism, thyroid cancer, or even total destruction of the thyroid gland. Fluoride is an endocrine disruptor. A general protoplasmic poison. You will never hear dentists or the dental industry discussing the thyroid gland when it comes to fluoride. To them, you are one huge tooth without any glands or organs. Recently, the Harvard School of Public Health reported from a meta-analysis that fluoride lowers the IQ's of children. Its a neurotoxin.

      From Harvard School of Public Health:
      "Impact of Fluoride on Neurological Development in Children"
      July 25, 2012

      “Fluoride seems to fit in with lead, mercury, and other poisons that cause chemical brain drain,” Grandjean says. “The effect of each toxicant may seem small, but the combined damage on a population scale can be serious, especially because the brain power of the next generation is crucial to all of us.”

      http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/features/features/fluoride-childrens-health-grandjean-choi.html

  14. QUESTION:
    I need to know what someone can do about insomina?
    My mother-in-law has insomnia. She has been tested and the only thing they can find is that she has sleep apnea. I would like to know if there is anything she can do about this condition that does not include prescription drugs?

    • ANSWER:
      My uncle has sleep apnea he has never taken drugs for it though. He does use a breathing machine that gently forces air into you nose. he says he sleeps much better now.
      -------

      Treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) includes lifestyle changes, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) (to prevent the airway from closing during sleep), and surgery. The goals of treatment are to relieve symptoms such as snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness and prevent other problems, such as high blood pressure. Your doctor will base your treatment on how severe your sleep apnea is.

      Generally, your doctor will have you try lifestyle changes and CPAP first. Surgery is an option only if these do not work.

      You may need to be treated for other health problems before you are treated for sleep apnea. For example, people who also have infections need to take antibiotics. People who have an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) need to take thyroid medicine.

      Children have the same treatment options as adults. However, surgery (tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy) generally is the first choice because enlarged tonsils or adenoids cause most cases of sleep apnea in children. Children are treated using CPAP if surgery is not possible or does not work.

  15. QUESTION:
    If you feel you have thyroid problems but your blood test came back normal?
    Would you see another doctor for another opinion? Or just forget about it? My symptoms are getting worse and I don't know what to do. The first doctor said I had classic symptoms of low thyroid but tests are normal.

    • ANSWER:
      FIRST THING~ If your doctor won't listen to YOU, get a new one! YOU KNOW when your body is good & when it's not! I refuse to listen to someone who won't listen to me...because they think they know it all since they "went to school for the degree". Well, they didn't go to school & study MY BODY! So, get a new doc, and don't feel bad about it. What if something bad happened to you? Would you hesitate to let that doc know at that point? DON"T LET IT GET THERE!
      Also, you can see an endocrenologist. They are specialists. Take your test to them, let them determine what level you are.

      I have given several links below to read & perhaps you can read through & understand the different thyroid symptoms & problems.
      Here is some information about myself, plus some symptoms since you seemed to be interested:
      I have low thyroid. I've had it for 10 years. I got it after I had my second child at about the age of 25. If you have low thyroid...here's a great question to answer: Can you see the floor of your house? That was what was asked of me at one point, and to my amazement, the answer was no!
      My signs are: messy house, no desire to do anything...go anywhere, spend time with my kids or my guy, sleep a lot, hard to keep my eyes open at times, HUGE weight gain that over the past years have not found an easy way to take off...so I give up a lot, I have terribly dry hair & don't wash it a lot so it stays strong, I have bumps on my face...not like pimples, but I think it's from dry skin, and perhaps some others that I can't remember at this time...that's another symptom--forgetfullness.
      Here are the "GENERAL" signs for most people: fatigue and lack of energy. Women suffering from underactive thyroid experience heavier menstrual periods. Sluggishness and forgetfulness are symptoms of underactive thyroid problem. Other symptoms of this thyroid disorder are dry skin and hair and constipation.
      If you have high thyroid, or an overactive one, the signs are: increased body metabolism. This is followed by weight loss and excessive warmth and sweating. Persons suffering from overactive thyroid experience trembling hands, irritability and rapid heartbeat or palpitations. Women with overactive thyroid or hyperthyroidism may experience shorter or lighter menstrual periods.
      I take medication, and sadly will have to take 1 pill everyday for the rest of my life. There's a blood check that they will do to see if you have low or high. I hope i've helped you!!

  16. QUESTION:
    Would Spearmint tea complicate things further?
    I'm 19 years old, have PCOS and a horrible high libido that causes anger and often depression. I heard that Spearmint tea could lower libido but could it make things worse since my hormones are already out of balance? I just got my period but haven't gotten it for months.

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      I recommend optimizing vit.D levels & starting a low carb lifeplan (which will be the best thing you can do to normalize hormones) that includes ground flax seeds as well as adding B100 complex daily. Spearmint tea sounds interesting

      Insulin is considered the "bully" hormone. While it dominates the bloodstream, other hormones aren't allowed to function properly, especially sex hormones & human growth hormone. This creates a major imbalance in the body which creates a lot of defenses that we call symptoms (excess fat accumulation, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high cholesterol, etc.)

      PCOS forum -

      http://forum.lowcarber.org/forumdisplay.php?f=46

      They don't know if insulin resistance creates PCOS or if PCOS creates insulin resistance. I believe it's just another side effect of insulin dysfunction. Long term ingestion of refined carbs "burn out" the insulin receptors on muscle cells.

      The body doesn't "need" carbs for energy. Carbs may provide quick energy but fats provide sustained energy. A low carb diet is a high fat diet, protein shouldn't be more than 30% of daily calories on any diet & preferably 20%. Coconut oil is the only fat to provide quick energy like a carb (but without the rise in blood sugar or insulin).

      I highly recommend a fat based diet to maximize health & balance hormones. All carbs >9g per hour trigger insulin.

      This is an example of items founds in a high fat diet - I don't recommend this as the sole source of foods but with the addition of eggs, dairy, vegetables & cold water fish (sardines, mackerel, herring or salmon) - it would be much closer to ideal.

      1750 calories 23g of net carbs (65g of fiber) & 80% of total calories from fat-

      3oz sunflower seeds
      3oz chia seeds
      1oz flax seeds
      2oz almonds
      1oz Brazil nuts
      2oz Olives
      half avocado

      Most people get overweight because their bodies just can't process carbs any more. They become insulin resistant & carbs go straight to fat cells. Fat storage is a symptom of the disease state. When your muscles become insulin resistant, then calories go directly to fat cells instead of to glycogen stores & you become overweight fast. It's nearly impossible to lose weight at this point without minimizing carbs because the body no longer is able to process carbs. The body won't release fat stores until the blood stream is free of insulin. In someone insulin resistant, the insulin response is too sensitive & produces too much insulin.

      As healthy as fruit may be, it just doesn't promote fat loss. Fructose, the sugar in most fruits is the most lipogenic (fat producing) carb & creates triglycerides which "trap" fat in fat cells.

      Type 2 diabetes used to be called adult onset diabetes because it was rare that people had it til they were in their 50s. They had to change the name because now it's common in children. Now they add high fructose corn syrup to infant formula & we have an epidemic of obese 6mo old infants who become diabetic as children.

      The whole purpose of carbohydrates is to put the body in fat storage mode so we can gain as much fat as possible to survive winter & famine. Carbs trigger an insatiable appetite so you can eat as much as is available. Carbs were only suppose to be available during harvest season, not year around.

      Dr.Broda Barnes suggested that for someone with thyroid dysfunctions to never go below 1500 calories or 30g of net carbs per day - otherwise the thyroid could be harmed further.

      The Barnes Basal Temperature Test (BBTT)is a simple test anyone can undertake at home in order to assess their thyroid function. It is most often used to detect undiagnosed hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) but will also provide evidence of hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid).

      I highly recommend 1 oz. (about 4) canned (or fresh) oysters every day for the naturally occurring zinc (170% DV) & 90% DV of vitamin B12 as well as getting 1g a week in Omega 3 fatty acids, EPA/DHA. Animal studies show that zinc deficiency is associated with decreased serum T3 levels. Zinc may play a role in thyroid hormone metabolism in patients with low T3 and may contribute to conversion of T4 to T3 in humans.

      http://www.livestrong.com/article/183380-how-to-make-spearmint-tea-to-stop-hair-growth/

      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/spearmint-tea.html

  17. QUESTION:
    Enlarged thyroid but labs were normal?
    I'm 26, one child, and healthy aside from some symptoms of underactive thyroid..... Only reason I suspected thyroid is my mom and both her sisters are on meds for underactive thyroid..... I have been experiencing huge fluxuations in weight, I'm cold all the time, thinning hair, fatigue despite a healthy diet and regular exercise, irregular period and occasional mild depression. Went to the doctor, he said my thyroid is enlarged but bloodwork was normal. IAnyone ever experienced this?

    • ANSWER:
      sometimes when you have a "borderline thyroid problem" the doc brushes it off not realizing that even borderlin thyroid problems can cause major symptoms. your doc should be treating your symptoms and not just looking at your bloodwork numbers. Also, I have heard the time of day you get your bloodwork done can affect the outcome. Try getting tested again early in the morning. If your thyroid is enlarged that means you have a thyroid problem plain and simple. My doc did a blood test on my for thyroid, it came back borderline-low, then he ordered an ultrasound on my neck to see if my thyroid is swollen, if the results come back that it's swollen, im going to ask him to put me on a low dose of meds so my symptoms can finally go away.

  18. QUESTION:
    What are symptoms of a child with a underactive thyroid?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of hypothyroidism in a child may include weight gain; not growing in height, fatigue, depression, mood changes, constipation, muscle and joint aches, dry skin, headaches, and all the other symptoms that adults can get like, low blood pressure, vertigo, slow heart rate, low body temp, feeling cold especially hands and feet, ridged fingernails, dry thinning hair, sore throat, sleep apnea, sensitivity to light, and thinning eyebrows

  19. QUESTION:
    Can anyone tell me what amitryptiline is used for?
    I was prescribed it but dont know what it is for.
    Also can I take this med with glaucoma

    • ANSWER:
      Amitriptyline is approved for the treatment of endogenous depression and involutional melancholia (depression of late life, which is no longer seen as a disease in its own right.) Adult typical dosages are 25 to 150 mg daily, with half this initially for elderly or adolescents.

      It may also be used to treat nocturnal enuresis (bed wetting). Children between the ages of 7 to 10 years having a dose of 10 to 20 mg, older children 25 to 50 mg at night. It should be gradually withdrawn at the end of the course, which overall should be of no more than 3 months.[1]

      In some European countries it is also approved as prophylaxis for patients with frequent migraines (usually 25 to 75 mg).

      [edit] Unapproved/Off-Label/Investigational
      Amitriptyline may be prescribed for other conditions such as insomnia, migraine, rebound headache, chronic pain, postherpetic neuralgia (persistent pain following a shingles attack), fibromyalgia, vulvodynia, interstitial cystitis, irritable bowel syndrome, diabetic peripheral neuropathy, neurological pain, and painful paresthesias related to multiple sclerosis and as a preventative (prophylaxis) for patients with frequent migraines. It is also used in small (10 mg) doses to act as a painkiller and ease the effects of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Typically lower dosages are required for pain modification of 10 to 50 mg daily.[1]

      Amitriptyline in very small doses (5 mg a day) is also sometimes prescribed to help ease the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome. It is thought to help combat symptoms of insomnia primarily, in addition to other selected symptoms of the affliction.

      A randomized controlled trial published in June 2005 found that amitriptyline was effective in functional dyspepsia refractory to famotidine and mosapride combination therapy.[2]

      [edit] Side effects
      Common side effects of using amitriptyline are weight loss or gain, drowsiness, nervousness, and dizziness insomnia. Some rare side effects include tinnitus, hypotension, mania, psychosis, anticholinergic effects, heart block, arrhythmias, extrapyramidal symptoms, depression, and hepatic toxicity.

      Overdose: The symptoms and the treatment of an overdose are largely the same as for the other tricyclic antidepressants.

      Add To Edit......

      Use with caution in

      Children

      Elderly people

      Decreased liver function

      Heart disease

      History of difficulty passing urine (urinary retention)

      Enlarged prostate gland (prostatic hypertrophy)

      History of increased pressure within the eye, eg glaucoma

      History of epilepsy

      People at risk of seizures (fits), eg due to alcohol/drug withdrawal, brain damage, other medicines

      Overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism)

      People taking thyroid medication for an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism)

      Tumour of the adrenal gland (phaeochromocytoma)

      Psychotic illness, eg schizophrenia

      People receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)

      Bipolar affective disorder (manic depression)

      Hereditary blood disorders called porphyrias.

      Not to be used in

      Severe liver disease

      People who have recently had a heart attack

      Defect of the heart's electrical message pathways resulting in decreased function of the heart (heart block)

      Irregular heart beats (arrhythmias)

      Closed angle glaucoma

      Manic phase of manic depression

      People who have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor antidepressant (MAOI) in the last two weeks.

      This medicine is not recommended for treating depression in children under 16 years of age, or for treating bedwetting in children under seven years of age.

  20. QUESTION:
    What do these symptoms mean I have?
    I woke up today and was sore, achy, tired, had no energy and it basically hurts to move. But I'm not sick to my stomach and no diarrhea. Could this be just the achy flu? I have two young kids and it's really hard in my current state to care for them effectively. A few months ago my doctor thought I might have hyperthyroid. Does it sound like this is what it might be, or just the achy flu?

    • ANSWER:
      Well, it's hard to tell -- those are what we call "constitutional symptoms", which means they can be present in an awful lot of normal people an awful lot of the time without any real reason. They also happen to be typical cold or flu symptoms.
      It doesn't sound like a typical hyperthyroid -- if anything, it'd be hypothyroid. (Hyperthyroid, or an overactive thyroid, tends to make people hyperactive, hungry/thirsty, weight loss, etc; hypothyroid, or underactive thyroid, does the opposite -- you feel tired, cold, lethargic, gain weight, etc.) If you're able to function for a couple days without your children killing each other, I'd try to rest up (good luck!) and hope things improve.

  21. QUESTION:
    What causes pins and needles?
    I haven't had them since I was a child, and then suddenly it happened again, so I am wondering why. Any ideas anyone?

    • ANSWER:
      Pins and needles' (paraesthesia) is a sensation of uncomfortable tingling or prickling, usually felt in the hands or feet. The affected area is sometimes said to have 'fallen asleep'. A common cause is leaning or lying awkwardly on a limb, which either presses against the nerves or reduces the blood supply to the local area. Changing position quickly restores normal feeling. Any numbness is soon replaced by the tingling and prickling sensation, as the nerves start sending messages again to the brain and spinal cord. In some cases, pins and needles are caused by nerve damage or certain disorders of the central nervous system. Always see your doctor if you experience frequent or persistent bouts of pins and needles.

      Symptoms
      The symptoms of pins and needles include:

      * Hands and feet are usually affected
      * Initial numbness and heaviness
      * Prickling and tingling sensation on the skin
      * Return of normal feeling a few minutes after changing position.

      A range of causes
      Pins and needles can be caused by a wide range of events and conditions, including:

      * Pressure on nerves
      * Reduced blood supply
      * Nerve injury
      * Hyperventilation or breathing excessively
      * The effect of toxic substances on the nerves, such as alcohol or lead
      * Certain medications
      * Diabetes
      * Multiple sclerosis
      * Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid gland)
      * Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA)
      * Stroke.

      Pressure-related pins and needles
      The peripheral nerves of the body send information back to the brain and spinal cord. When a sensory nerve is pressed by a cramped or awkward position, its functioning starts to falter. In time, the affected limb 'falls asleep', which means the sensory messages are blocked. Once pressure is taken off the nerve, functioning resumes. The uncomfortable prickling sensation is caused by the resumption of pain messages from nerves to the brain. Other nerves, such as those that provide information on temperature, take a little longer to recover.

      Pinched nerve
      Nerves can be pinched by bones and other tissue. Some examples include:

      * Carpal tunnel syndrome - the main nerve that services the hand runs through a ring of wrist bones. Inflamed and swollen tendon membranes reduce the amount of room inside the wrist and squash the nerve. Symptoms include pins and needles, pain and weakness.
      * Cervical nerve root irritation - nerves in the neck exit the spinal cord via small holes between the vertebrae. These small holes can be narrowed by inflammation, trauma or outgrowths of bone tissue (bone spurs). The nerves are compressed, causing pins and needles and, sometimes, referred pain into the arms.
      * Sciatica - the legs and feet are serviced by the sciatic nerve, which starts as four nerve roots between the vertebrae of the lower back. Each vertebra is cushioned by discs of cartilage. A prolapsed or 'slipped' disc bulges out and presses against one of the roots of the sciatic nerve, causing pins and needles and referred pain down the leg.

      Neuritis
      Neuritis is inflammation of the nerves. Some of the causes include:

      * Alcohol - chronic overconsumption of alcohol can be toxic to nerves and cause a condition called peripheral neuropathy, characterised by pins and needles.
      * Guillain-Barre syndrome - thought to be triggered by some kinds of viral infection.
      * Pernicious anaemia - causes a vitamin B12 deficiency that affects the functioning of the spinal cord.

      Nerve disease
      Nerve disease, or neuropathy, is characterised by the lack of sensory information to the brain due to damage of the sensory nerves. For example, a person with neuropathy may not experience pain to the normal degree, if at all. Conditions that may damage the sensory nerves include:

      * Severed spinal cord
      * Diabetes
      * Charcot-Marie-Tooth inherited neuropathy
      * Exposure to certain drugs and heavy metals, such as lead
      * Chronic overconsumption of alcohol.

      Seek medical advice
      The occasional bout of pins and needles is a harmless event. However, chronic pins and needles can be symptomatic of some other underlying disorder. Always see your doctor for a thorough medical investigation if you experience persistent or frequent episodes of numbness or pins and needles.

      Treatment options
      Treatment depends on the cause. For example, carpal tunnel syndrome may be treated with rest, splinting and medications such as anti-inflammatory and diuretic drugs. A nerve pinched by bone or some other tissue may need chiropractic or physiotherapy, or perhaps surgery to ease the pressure and allow full nerve functioning to resume. Underlying conditions such as diabetes need to be properly controlled to ease associated symptoms, including pins and needles. The symptoms of nerve inflammation and damage caused by chronic overconsumption of alcohol generally improve once the person stops drinking.

  22. QUESTION:
    Does anyone happen to know if thyroids could be the reason for this problem?
    You see, my mom is my best friend, I literally do not spend more time with anyone else!! I spend so much time with my mom and down at her end of the house that I have neglected my bedroom cause im never in it and its trashed. But my mom seems to be SOOOOO rediculously, uncontrolablly, and abnormally tired all the time. I do spend alot of time with her so in that case i am aware of how much sleep that my mom gets and she honestly gets quite a bit, but for the way that she falls asleep and doesnt have control of when she " nodds out " you would think that she hasnt had any sleep in years. A very close family friend of ours that also spends a great amount of time with my mom as well as myself, mentioned to us because it became of a concern to him that it could be something wrong with her thyroids. She is still active, she still does things and for the most part of the begining of the day is up and about, But it seems that every and any friends house we stop by she cant seem to stay awake!
    Thank you to all that have answered my question. I think its great yahoo has this because it really leaves alot of possibilities for alot of opinions which I like. Once again thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Oh boy! Let me tell you about being tired! I can't even walk to the car without feeling knocked out when I'm not on my medication. Even just a day or two without, and I really suffer for it.
      have given several links below to read & perhaps you can read through & understand the different thyroid symptoms & problems.
      Here is some information about myself, plus some symptoms since you seemed to be interested:
      I have low thyroid. I've had it for 10 years. I got it after I had my second child at about the age of 25. If you have low thyroid...here's a great question to answer: Can you see the floor of your house? That was what was asked of me at one point, and to my amazement, the answer was no!
      My signs are: messy house, no desire to do anything...go anywhere, spend time with my kids or my guy, sleep a lot, hard to keep my eyes open at times, HUGE weight gain that over the past years have not found an easy way to take off...so I give up a lot, I have terribly dry hair & don't wash it a lot so it stays strong, I have bumps on my face...not like pimples, but I think it's from dry skin, and perhaps some others that I can't remember at this time...that's another symptom--forgetfullness.
      Here are the "GENERAL" signs for most people: fatigue and lack of energy. Women suffering from underactive thyroid experience heavier menstrual periods. Sluggishness and forgetfulness are symptoms of underactive thyroid problem. Other symptoms of this thyroid disorder are dry skin and hair and constipation.
      If you have high thyroid, or an overactive one, the signs are: increased body metabolism. This is followed by weight loss and excessive warmth and sweating. Persons suffering from overactive thyroid experience trembling hands, irritability and rapid heartbeat or palpitations. Women with overactive thyroid or hyperthyroidism may experience shorter or lighter menstrual periods.
      I take medication, and sadly will have to take 1 pill everyday for the rest of my life. There's a blood check that they will do to see if you have low or high. I hope i've helped you!!

  23. QUESTION:
    About an hour or two after I take my thyroid medicine, I get chest pain, and my neck tightens...?
    This happened with the fist prescription of Synthroid...so the Doctor changed the meds to Armour Thyroid....these symptoms seemed to go away, but now they are reoccuring. I was wondering if this is normal, or if anyone else has experience these type of side effects. The chest pain is pretty much in one area on the right side, it feels as though someone stuck me with a pencil or something small like that, the area around it burns a little but it doesn't spread much further thean that. The area is even tender to the touch. My neck tightens up making it it hard to swallow. Any thoughts please.

    • ANSWER:
      Side Effects of Armour Thyroid
      Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

      Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur since they may indicate an overdose or an allergic reaction:

      Less common or rare
      Headache (severe) in children; skin rash or hives

      Signs and symptoms of overdose
      Chest pain; confusion; fast or irregular heartbeat; mood swings; muscle weakness; psychosis; restlessness (extreme); yellow eyes or skin; shortness of breath

      For patients taking this medicine for underactive thyroid:

      This medicine usually takes several weeks to have a noticeable effect on your condition. Until it begins to work, you may experience no change in your symptoms. Check with your doctor if the following symptoms continue:
      Clumsiness; coldness; constipation; dry, puffy skin; listlessness; muscle aches; sleepiness; tiredness; weakness; weight gain

      call your doctor immediately
      your dosage may need to be adjusted since chest pain is a side effect of an overdose of this medicine

      B.

  24. QUESTION:
    Does anybody know any alternative medicine to eliminate the nodules of the thyroid gland?

    • ANSWER:
      Try getting some iodine in your system. I don't think the nodules are really bothersome though.
      I have given several links below to read & perhaps you can read through & understand the different thyroid symptoms & problems.
      Here is some information about myself, plus some symptoms since you seemed to be interested:
      I have low thyroid. I've had it for 10 years. I got it after I had my second child at about the age of 25. If you have low thyroid...here's a great question to answer: Can you see the floor of your house? That was what was asked of me at one point, and to my amazement, the answer was no!
      My signs are: messy house, no desire to do anything...go anywhere, spend time with my kids or my guy, sleep a lot, hard to keep my eyes open at times, HUGE weight gain that over the past years have not found an easy way to take off...so I give up a lot, I have terribly dry hair & don't wash it a lot so it stays strong, I have bumps on my face...not like pimples, but I think it's from dry skin, and perhaps some others that I can't remember at this time...that's another symptom--forgetfullness.
      Here are the "GENERAL" signs for most people: fatigue and lack of energy. Women suffering from underactive thyroid experience heavier menstrual periods. Sluggishness and forgetfulness are symptoms of underactive thyroid problem. Other symptoms of this thyroid disorder are dry skin and hair and constipation.
      If you have high thyroid, or an overactive one, the signs are: increased body metabolism. This is followed by weight loss and excessive warmth and sweating. Persons suffering from overactive thyroid experience trembling hands, irritability and rapid heartbeat or palpitations. Women with overactive thyroid or hyperthyroidism may experience shorter or lighter menstrual periods.
      I take medication, and sadly will have to take 1 pill everyday for the rest of my life. There's a blood check that they will do to see if you have low or high. I hope i've helped you!!

  25. QUESTION:
    What should I do if my hair is falling out from birth control? what can do or take for it to stop?HELP?

    • ANSWER:
      Call your obgyn asap.

      Sounds like you are suffering from hypothyroidism.
      Have you recently had a child, or a miscarriage?

      Have you ever had an autoimmune disorder like lupus or scleroderma?

      All of those things can cause your body's immune system to attack your thyroid gland, then "burn it out", leaving you with an underactive thyroid.

      A common symptom of hypothyroidism is massive amounts of hair falling out.

      It will only get worse until you start taking some meds (probably levothyroxine), so get to the doc.

  26. QUESTION:
    Other than underactive thyroid, what causes hypothermia in my case?
    I have all the symptoms (for months now) pointing towards hypothyroidism - low body temperature (95-97), always cold, constipation, dry skin/thinning hair, tired, etc. I recently had TSH test, which came back normal. Yet, I am going in to see an endocrinologist since I know something ISNT normal. From this alone it is obvious that something is not right with my thyroid gland...however, there is something else that I wasn't sure may have an influence. A few weeks my lymph node under my neck swelled up, became tender...I soon develop aching head sickness and fought it days later. I assumed the swollen lymph node was just a response to fight the infection. It continues to remain today (which isn't suprising) and this evening it started to become tender again, slightly more inflammed.
    I was wondering if there was any connection btwn the inflammed lymph node and my other symptoms, AND if there are any other causes of my symptoms OTHER than hypothyroidism.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Mike

      Here is a clear defination and how to resolve it. Im not sure you have it, but here is the info anyway. You sound like you also need to take control of your health. Quit focusing on the negative and start making positive changes with your diet as well as your attitude toward your health. Feel and Viualize a healthy great body! You'll be surprised on just how the mind change will benefit your health.

      There is a self test for Hypo on here as well.

      Definition: Hypothyroidism is caused by under active production of thyroid hormone by the thyroid gland.

      Symptoms: It is a very common but often overlooked condition with symptoms that include fatigue, weight gain, slowed heart rate, constipation, irritability, sensitivities to cold, mental depression, slowness or slurring of speech, drooping and swollen eyes, swollen face, recurrent infections, increased allergic reactions, headaches, hair loss, brittleness of hair, female problems (such as heavy menstrual flow, painful periods, and premenstrual tension), decreased immune functioning, and calcium metabolism problems. In children, hypothyroidism can also retard normal growth and development. If undiagnosed and untreated, hypothyroidism can cause or contribute to many other recurring or otherwise non-responsive health problems.

      Cause: Hypothyroidism can be caused by food allergies, excess stress, environmental toxins, insufficient exercise, B vitamin deficiencies, lack of iron, lack of digestive enzymes, liver disease, hormone imbalances, and/or parasites. All of these factors need to be screened for and addressed before lasting relief can be achieved.

      Sulfa drugs, lithium, synthetic estrogen, and antihistamines can exacerbate hypothyroidism symptoms. In addition, if you are on thyroid medication, increase calcium supplementation to reduce the risk of bone loss.

      Low thyroid function may also be due to Hashimoto`s disease, a condition in which the body becomes allergic to its own thyroid gland and forms antibodies that attack it, thus lowering thyroid hormone output.

      Caution: If you suspect you are suffering from Hashimoto`s disease, consult a physician immediately.

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Natural Cures

      Broda Barnes Home Thyroid Test: The following simple test was developed by Broda Barnes, one of the first physicians to recognize the widespread incidence of hypothyroidism. Place a thermometer by the side of your bed before you go to sleep. In the morning before getting out of bed, lie still and place the thermometer under your armpit for 15 minutes, then check your temperature. A temperature below 97.5° F may indicate a problem with the thyroid gland. Take the temperature in this manner for three days, except for the first few days of the menstrual cycle and the middle day of the cycle, and calculate the average temperature. If it is consistently low, it is an indicator that your have hypothyroidism. The lower your body temperature is, the greater your degree of hypothyroidism.

      Diet: Eat an organic, whole foods diet, emphasizing foods that are naturally high in iodine such as fish, kelp, vegetables, and root vegetables (such as potatoes). Also, increase your daily consumption of foods rich in vitamin B complex, such as whole grains and raw nuts and seeds, and foods rich in vitamin A, such as dark green and yellow vegetables. But avoid foods that slow down production of thyroid hormone, such as cabbage, Brussels sprouts, mustard greens, broccoli, turnips, kale, spinach, peaches, and pears.

      Herbs: Mild cases of hypothyroidism can be helped by herbal bitters such as gentian or mugwort, while constipation due to low thyroid function can be improved by yellowdock, butternut, or cascara sagrada. St. John`s wort can also be helpful.

      Homeopathy: Calc carb. in a dose of 1M once a day is very useful for treating hypothyroidism and improving overall thyroid function.

      Hydrotherapy: Hydrotherapy is the application of water, ice, steam and hot and cold temperatures to maintain and restore health. Treatments include full body immersion, steam baths, saunas, sitz baths, colonic irrigation and the application of hot and/or cold compresses. Hydrotherapy is effective for treating a wide range of conditions and can easily be used in the home as part of a self-care program. Many Naturopathic Physicians, Physical Therapists and Day Spas use Hydrotherapy as part of treatment. I suggest several at-home hydrotherapy treatments.

      Lifestyle: Regular aerobic exercise can play an important role in helping to regulate thyroid hormone production.

      Nutritional Supplementation: Organic thyroid glandular extracts can help restore normal thyroid function, but should only be used under the supervision of your physician. Other useful nutrients include vitamin A, vitamin B complex, essential fatty acids, iodine, kelp, calcium, magnesium, and zinc.

      Alternative Professional Care: If your symptoms persist despite the above measures, seek the help of a qualified health professional. The following professional care therapies have all been shown to be useful for treating hypothyroidism include: Acupuncture, Biofeedback Training, Cell Therapy, Detoxification Therapy, Environmental Medicine, Homeopathy, Magnetic Field Therapy, Naturopathic Medicine, Osteopathy, Qigong, Traditional Chinese Medicine and Yoga.

      Best of health to you

  27. QUESTION:
    I was born with a Heart Murmur. My family doctor told me he could no longer hear it. I am 25 years old?
    At 25 I went to the doctor and was told recently that the murmur is there. I supposedly had a seizure when I was 21 for no apparent reason. EKG at that time showed nothing abnormal. At 25 I feel very tired all the time and my breathing is sometimes shallow, i think because i have sinus problems. Should i be concerned about the murmur?

    • ANSWER:
      A heart murmur is an extra sound that a doctor can hear when listening to your heart. Heart murmurs are very common in young children. Most heart murmurs are benign, meaning that they are not associated with underlying heart disease. Heart murmurs can be associated with serious underlying heart disease, such as an abnormality in the valve, ventricular or atrial septal defect, etc. If a heart murmur is associated with a serious underlying etiology, then you would expect it to produce symptoms like shortness of breath, chest pain, passing out (syncope), etc. It is very common for murmurs to be present in childhood and disappear with time. This suggests your murmur was secondary to a benign etiology and is nothing to worry about. There are many causes for fatigue, such as anemia, underactive thyroid, chronic infections (sinuses), etc. You should discuss this with your doctor, because they could evaluate you for these causes. I think the murmur is unlikely to be the cause of your fatigue, especially if it is not audible anymore. Ask your doctor though, because he/she knows all the details of your medical history. Good luck.

  28. QUESTION:
    iam trying to loose weight but ive got a under active thyroid is there any tips to give it a kick start?
    iv joined a slimming club and stayed the same the 1st week ive stuck to it this week again and am due to be weighed wednesday i want to loose 28 lbs or there abouts then i will be at my ideal weight. iam on medication for my thyroid ive been on this for 8 weeks and my doc says this ie the right one for me

    • ANSWER:
      Well, one thing, I wouldn't do the herbalife thing...that IS scary doing diet drugs when you're on thyroid meds. DON'T DO IT!! Not tryin to put any other answerer down, it's just that someone with low thyroid is different from someone who has a normal thyroid. We tend to get heart palpatations, panic attacks, hard to breathe...this can all happen if we have to high of a dosage, or even if we take a diet pill!
      It's not good to suggest diet pills to those who shouldn't take them!
      I also want to mention~ If your doctor won't listen to YOU-and most don't, get a new one! YOU KNOW when your body is good & when it's not! I refuse to listen to someone who won't listen to me...because they think they know it all since they "went to school for the degree". Well, they didn't go to school & study MY BODY! So, get a new doc, and don't feel bad about it. What if something bad happened to you? Would you hesitate to let that doc know at that point? DON"T LET IT GET THERE!

      Anyway, as far as diet, I don't really have a diet for my thyroid problem. I have lazy thyroid, as you call it, also. I think moderate excersice would be helpful. I take 300 MCG per day!!! So mine is REALLY lazy! It takes a lot for me to get going, and if i miss a day or 2, i really pay for it!! I really do try to follow a healthy eating habit anyway, but not because of the thyroid....only because I feel better when I eat better.

      I have given several links below to read & perhaps you can read through & understand the different thyroid symptoms & problems.

      Here is some information about myself, plus some symptoms since you seemed to be interested:
      I have low thyroid. I've had it for 10 years. I got it after I had my second child at about the age of 25. If you have low thyroid...here's a great question to answer: Can you see the floor of your house? That was what was asked of me at one point, and to my amazement, the answer was no!
      My signs are: messy house, no desire to do anything...go anywhere, spend time with my kids or my guy, sleep a lot, hard to keep my eyes open at times, HUGE weight gain that over the past years have not found an easy way to take off...so I give up a lot, I have terribly dry hair & don't wash it a lot so it stays strong, I have bumps on my face...not like pimples, but I think it's from dry skin, and perhaps some others that I can't remember at this time...that's another symptom--forgetfullness.

      Here are the "GENERAL" signs for most people: fatigue and lack of energy. Women suffering from underactive thyroid experience heavier menstrual periods. Sluggishness and forgetfulness are symptoms of underactive thyroid problem. Other symptoms of this thyroid disorder are dry skin and hair and constipation.

      If you have high thyroid, or an overactive one, the signs are: increased body metabolism. This is followed by weight loss and excessive warmth and sweating. Persons suffering from overactive thyroid experience trembling hands, irritability and rapid heartbeat or palpitations. Women with overactive thyroid or hyperthyroidism may experience shorter or lighter menstrual periods.

      I sadly will have to take 1 pill everyday for the rest of my life.
      I hope i've helped you!!

  29. QUESTION:
    alternative medication for thyroid disease?
    after i gave birth, i had gained 6stones in one year! after endless tests it showed i had thyroid disease. (underactive)
    they are still getting my medication levels rite, at the moment i am on 125mg a day, but it is making no difference at all. i am constantly tired, i have no energy. is there anything else i can try. its bad enough putting on so much weight, but being so lathargic is awful, especially wen i am trying to raise a child.
    please advise. is thyroxine the only treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      Also you may want to get another doctors opinion, My son and sister both had major issues(different doctors)with getting levels right,Took her almost 2 years with all the same symptoms as you, She went to another Dr and with consultation with her first Dr they finally all got it right, Dont be discouraged,keep looking for the right levels and ask many questions.

  30. QUESTION:
    Do you think I might have an underactive thyroid (Hypothyroid)?
    Symptoms that I have;
    Depression
    Anxiety
    Sudden mood swings
    Thin hair
    Dry Skin
    Obsessive over certain things (TV shows, etc)
    Social withdrawal
    I used to be overweight, but lost some weight although it's taken quite a while, still trying.
    Constant headaches

    What do you think?
    Also have irregular sleeping patterns.
    Also tired a lot and have bad concentration.

    • ANSWER:
      Speak to your doctor, i suffer from all of these but they said i didn't have underactive thyroid but just get checked cos i think they might be able to give you medication to help with your problem.
      Have you just had a baby?
      It can also be the after effect from child birth.

  31. QUESTION:
    I have PCOS (Polycystic Ovary Syndrome), does it contribute to me being overweight?
    Okay, so I have PCOS and I wanted to know if it can be a contributing factor to me being overweight? Thanks. xoxo.

    • ANSWER:
      They don't know if insulin resistance creates PCOS or if PCOS creates insulin resistance. I believe it's just another side effect of insulin dysfunction. Long term ingestion of refined carbs "burn out" the insulin receptors on muscle cells, so calories go directly to fat cells, leaving muscle cells screaming for nutrition.

      Most people get overweight because their bodies just can't process carbs any more. They become insulin resistant & carbs go straight to fat cells. Fat storage is a symptom of the disease state. When your muscles become insulin resistant, then calories go directly to fat cells instead of to glycogen stores & you become overweight fast. It's nearly impossible to lose weight at this point without minimizing carbs because the body no longer is able to process carbs. The body won't release fat stores until the blood stream is free of insulin. In someone insulin resistant, the insulin response is too sensitive & produces too much insulin.

      As healthy as fruit may be, it just doesn't promote fat loss. Fructose, the sugar in most fruits is the most lipogenic (fat producing) carb & creates triglycerides which "trap" fat in fat cells.

      Type 2 diabetes used to be called adult onset diabetes because it was rare that people had it til they were in their 50s. They had to change the name because now it's common in children. Now they add high fructose corn syrup to infant formula & we have an epidemic of obese 6mo old infants who become diabetic as children.

      The whole purpose of carbohydrates is to put the body in fat storage mode so we can gain as much fat as possible to survive winter & famine. Carbs trigger an insatiable appetite so you can eat as much as is available. Carbs were only suppose to be available during harvest season, not year around.

      The body doesn't "need" carbs for energy. Carbs may provide quick energy but fats provide sustained energy. A low carb diet is a high fat diet, protein shouldn't be more than 30% of daily calories on any diet & preferably 20%. Coconut oil is the only fat to provide quick energy like a carb (but without the rise in blood sugar or insulin).

      I highly recommend a fat based diet to maximize health & balance hormones. All carbs >9g per hour trigger insulin.

      Insulin is considered the "bully" hormone. While it dominates the bloodstream, other hormones aren't allowed to function properly, especially sex hormones & human growth hormone. This creates a major imbalance in the body which creates a lot of defenses that we call symptoms (excess fat accumulation, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high cholesterol, etc.)

      This is an example of items founds in a high fat diet - I don't recommend this as the sole source of foods but with the addition of eggs, dairy, vegetables & cold water fish (sardines, mackerel, herring or salmon) - it would be much closer to ideal.

      1750 calories 23g of net carbs (65g of fiber) & 80% of total calories from fat-

      3oz sunflower seeds
      3oz chia seeds
      1oz flax seeds
      2oz almonds
      1oz Brazil nuts
      2oz Olives
      half avocado

      Dr.Broda Barnes suggested that for someone with thyroid dysfunctions to never go below 1500 calories or 30g of net carbs per day - otherwise the thyroid could be harmed further.

      The Barnes Basal Temperature Test (BBTT)is a simple test anyone can undertake at home in order to assess their thyroid function. It is most often used to detect undiagnosed hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) but will also provide evidence of hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid).

      I highly recommend 1 oz. (about 4) canned (or fresh) oysters every day for the naturally occurring zinc (170% DV) & 90% DV of vitamin B12 as well as getting 1g a week in Omega 3 fatty acids, EPA/DHA. Animal studies show that zinc deficiency is associated with decreased serum T3 levels. Zinc may play a role in thyroid hormone metabolism in patients with low T3 and may contribute to conversion of T4 to T3 in humans.

      I recommend optimizing vit.D levels & starting a low carb lifeplan.

      PCOS forum -

      http://forum.lowcarber.org/forumdisplay.php?f=46

      Vitamin D deficiency may contribute to the wide set of disorders associated with metabolic syndrome (syndrome X), as well as to PCOS. In a study published in 2004, the authors saw a 60% improvement in insulin sensitivity in healthy, vitamin D replete adults

      http://www.womentowomen.com/healthynutrition/vitamind.aspx

  32. QUESTION:
    DO ALL THYROID PATIENTS GO BLIND/RUINED EYESIGHT?
    My friends worried her sight may go bad or something as shes being diagnosed with hypothyroidism and is only 30 and wants kids also?

    • ANSWER:
      I`ve had hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) for 11 years and still have tired eyes with drooping eyelids even though my blood levels are OK. Those are the only symptoms and do not lead to serious eyesight problems. Having children shouldn`t be a problem either if the GP is monitering the thyroid levels. It usually takes a year for the thyroid to settle down then you are on one dose of thyroxine for the rest of your life. The only constant problem is getting tired easily. And never forget to take the tablet.

  33. QUESTION:
    how do I know if I need to have me kid checked for a Thyroid problem?
    he is 9months old 29lb , he was born about a month early and I dont over feed him my doctor says hes fine but Im not sure if I should get a 2nd opinion I have been told that I need to have him checked... Should I trust my doctor or get a 2nd opinion?????????

    PLEASE HELP

    • ANSWER:
      have you looked into the symptoms
      i have an underactive thyroid and most of the symptoms cannot be seen by others, so really youd need your child to tell you how they feel but as he is only 9 months old so obviously he cant
      if your really concerned go to a doctor and ask for a blood test looking specificly for thyroid conditions
      i dont know if youd have to pay for it (im in the uk so healthcare is free) but i think even if your in the UK if you request something that the doctors do not see as nessasary then you might have to pay

  34. QUESTION:
    what are the signs or symptoms of an enlarged thyroid? what are the treatments?

    • ANSWER:
      I think you may be referring to low/high thyroid levels. I have given several links below to read & perhaps you can read through & understand the different thyroid symptoms & problems.
      Here is some information about myself, plus some symptoms since you seemed to be interested:
      I have low thyroid. I've had it for 10 years. I got it after I had my second child at about the age of 25. If you have low thyroid...here's a great question to answer: Can you see the floor of your house? That was what was asked of me at one point, and to my amazement, the answer was no!
      My signs are: messy house, no desire to do anything...go anywhere, spend time with my kids or my guy, sleep a lot, hard to keep my eyes open at times, HUGE weight gain that over the past years have not found an easy way to take off...so I give up a lot, I have terribly dry hair & don't wash it a lot so it stays strong, I have bumps on my face...not like pimples, but I think it's from dry skin, and perhaps some others that I can't remember at this time...that's another symptom--forgetfullness.
      Here are the "GENERAL" signs for most people: fatigue and lack of energy. Women suffering from underactive thyroid experience heavier menstrual periods. Sluggishness and forgetfulness are symptoms of underactive thyroid problem. Other symptoms of this thyroid disorder are dry skin and hair and constipation.
      If you have high thyroid, or an overactive one, the signs are: increased body metabolism. This is followed by weight loss and excessive warmth and sweating. Persons suffering from overactive thyroid experience trembling hands, irritability and rapid heartbeat or palpitations. Women with overactive thyroid or hyperthyroidism may experience shorter or lighter menstrual periods.
      I take medication, and sadly will have to take 1 pill everyday for the rest of my life. There's a blood check that they will do to see if you have low or high. I hope i've helped you!!

  35. QUESTION:
    could i have an underactive thyroid?
    hi my mum has an underactive thyroid has done for years and in the past few months i have tried to lose weight but i am finding it really difficult. i am only 18 and only a couple of years ago i used to lose it really easily. should i go and get checked out as i dont know if this is hereditory ??

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, absolutely get tested. Have them run a TSH, FREE T4, and FREE T3. If your TSH is higher than 2 then it is supicious. Most dr's dont consider you hypoT until you hit a 5, but that is outdated and incorrect. If you have symptoms and your TSH is higher than a 2, find an endo who will treat you based on symptoms. Heredity plays a HUGE role in thyroid disease. Ideally children of parents who have thyroid diseae should be tested once a year beginning around puberty.

  36. QUESTION:
    Is radio active iodine safe for thyroid cancer?
    After thyroidectomy, doctor advises to go for radio active iodine therapy. Basically not sure whether he has really cancer or doctors and labs made it up for money. When being cheated this way how can we assure to take leaga action about this kind of cheating!

    • ANSWER:
      Don't mess with this kind of business. Would you want him to die, and because you weren't sure whether you should believe the doc? Why not get a second opinion? And, a third if needed. Don't mention the surgery/cancer to someone else, if you can, and see what the outcome is.
      In case you're interested, here's some information about myself. Also, below are some links, including excellent sites about thyroid cancer & more.
      I have low thyroid. I have had it for 10 years. I came about after I had my second child. Most people can do well, but myself, if I even miss a day or two, I get super tired, and VERY cranky. My body literally ate up my thyroid...it's almost non-existent. I am on 300mg of levoxyrothin.
      If you have low thyroid...here's a great question to answer: Can you see the floor of your house? That was what was asked of me at one point, and to my amazement, the answer was no!
      Anyway, the signs are:fatigue and lack of energy. Women suffering from underactive thyroid experience heavier menstrual periods. Sluggishness and forgetfulness are symptoms of underactive thyroid problem. Other symptoms of this thyroid disorder are dry skin and hair and constipation.
      If you have high thyroid, or an overactive one, the signs are: increased body metabolism. This is followed by weight loss and excessive warmth and sweating. Persons suffering from overactive thyroid experience trembling hands, irritability and rapid heartbeat or palpitations. Women with overactive thyroid or hyperthyroidism may experience shorter or lighter menstrual periods.
      I take medication, and sadly will have to take 1 pill everyday for the rest of my life. There's a blood check that they will do to see if you have low or high. I hope i've helped you!!

  37. QUESTION:
    Why do I have a slow metabolism, whilst the rest of my family don't?

    • ANSWER:
      To a certain extent, a person's basal metabolic rate (BMR) is inherited in other words passed on through the genes a person gets from his or her parents. Sometimes health problems can affect a person's BMR. But people can actually change their BMR in certain ways. For example, exercising more will not only cause a person to burn more calories directly from the extra activity itself, but becoming more physically fit will increase BMR as well. BMR is also influenced by body composition like people with more muscle and less fat generally have higher BMR's.

      * Things that can go wrong with Metabolism:

      In a broad sense, a metabolic disorder is any disease that is caused by an abnormal chemical reaction in the body's cells. Most disorders of metabolism involve either abnormal levels of enzymes or hormones or problems with the functioning of those enzymes or hormones. When the metabolism of body chemicals is blocked or defective, it can cause a buildup of toxic substances in the body or a deficiency of substances needed for normal body function, either of which can lead to serious symptoms.

      Some metabolic diseases are inherited. These conditions are called inborn errors of metabolism. When babies are born, they're tested for many of these metabolic diseases in a newborn screening test. Many of these inborn errors of metabolism can lead to serious complications or even death if they're not controlled with diet or medication from an early age.

      Examples of metabolic disoders and conditions include:

      * G6PD deficiency. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, or G6PD, is just one of the many enzymes that play a role in cell metabolism. G6PD is produced by red blood cells and helps the body metabolize carbohydrates. Without enough normal G6PD to help red blood cells handle certain harmful substances, red blood cells can be damaged or destroyed, leading to a condition known as hemolytic anemia. In a process called hemolysis (pronounced: hih-mah-luh-sus), red blood cells are destroyed prematurely, and the bone marrow (the soft, spongy part of the bone that produces new blood cells) may not be able to keep up with the body's need to produce more new red blood cells. Kids with G6PD deficiency may be pale and tired and have a rapid heartbeat and breathing. They may also have an enlarged spleen or jaundice - a yellowing of the skin and eyes. G6PD deficiency is usually treated by discontinuing medications or treating the illness or infection causing the stress on the red blood cells.

      * Galactosemia: Babies born with this inborn error of metabolism do not have enough of the enzyme that breaks down the sugar in milk called galactose. This enzyme is produced in the liver. If the liver doesn't produce enough of this enzyme, galactose builds up in the blood and can cause serious health problems. Symptoms usually occur within the first days of life and include vomiting, swollen liver, and jaundice. If galactosemia is not diagnosed and treated quickly, it can cause liver, eye, kidney, and brain damage.

      * Hyperthyroidism: Hyperthyroidism is caused by an overactive thyroid gland. The thyroid releases too much of the hormone thyroxine, which increases the person's basal metabolic rate (BMR). It causes symptoms such as weight loss, increased heart rate and blood pressure, protruding eyes, and a swelling in the neck from an enlarged thyroid (goiter). The disease may be controlled with medications or through surgery or radiation treatments.

      * Hypothyroidism: Hypothyroidism is caused by an absent or underactive thyroid gland and it results from a developmental problem or a destructive disease of the thyroid. The thyroid releases too little of the hormone thyroxine, so a person's basal metabolic rate (BMR) is low. In infants and young children who don't get treatment, this condition can result in stunted growth and mental retardation. Hypothyroidism slows body processes and causes fatigue, slow heart rate, excessive weight gain, and constipation. Kids and teens with this condition can be treated with oral thyroid hormone to achieve normal levels in the body.

      * Phenylketonuria: Also known as PKU, this condition occurs in infants due to a defect in the enzyme that breaks down the amino acid phenylalanine. This amino acid is necessary for normal growth in infants and children and for normal protein production. However, if too much of it builds up in the body, brain tissue is affected and mental retardation occurs. Early diagnosis and dietary restriction of the amino acid can prevent or lessen the severity of these complications.

      * Type 1 diabetes mellitus: Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas doesn't produce and secrete enough insulin. Symptoms of this disease include excessive thirst and urination, hunger, and weight loss. Over the long term, the disease can cause kidney problems, pain due to nerve damage, blindness, and heart and blood vessel disease. Kids and teens with type 1 diabetes need to receive regular injections of insulin and control blood sugar levels to reduce the risk of developing problems from diabetes.

      * Type 2 diabetes: Type 2 diabetes happens when the body can't respond normally to insulin. The symptoms of this disorder are similar to those of type 1 diabetes. Many children and teens who develop type 2 diabetes are overweight, and this is thought to play a role in their decreased responsiveness to insulin. Some kids and teens can be treated successfully with dietary changes, exercise, and oral medication, but insulin injections are necessary in other cases. Controlling blood sugar levels reduces the risk of developing the same kinds of long-term health problems that occur with type 1 diabetes.

      I recommend that you consult any concern with regards to this with your doctor for further evaluation.

      Good luck :)

  38. QUESTION:
    Gluten Free Diet...how long until you see results?
    I think my husband's endoscopy for celiac disease came back negative. The doctor is a flake and his employees are useless. My husband has not had a blood test yet.

    If he went on a gluten free diet, how long might it be before he saw an improvement in his life? Here are his worst symptoms:

    stomach upset
    all over body rash
    fatigue
    psoriasis
    underactive thyroid

    Thanks for your help!

    • ANSWER:
      Since you asked how long it might be before he saw an improvement in his life, I'm guessing that he hasn't gone on a gluten free diet yet, correct? if so, results come very quickly. There was one case of Celiac disease that I researched recently. Although the patient was a child, he saw improvements within days. I'm not quite sure if it will be the same for adults. I'm still learning myself...

      Hope this helps! at least a little..

  39. QUESTION:
    what does it mean if you have a underactive thyroid?
    im 14 & i just went back to the doctor after having a bloodtest & catscan.

    catscan was good- i had it for constant headaches.
    and bloodtest- my thyroid levels seems be low i guess?
    and i have most all symptoms for underactive thyroid. and
    my doctor said he's worried so i have to get another blood test in
    2-3 weeks.

    what happens if your thyroid is low?
    im sooooo tired ALLL the time. like
    i can sleep 20 hours and still not have enough energy.
    i think he said my level was like 3. something. idr.

    • ANSWER:
      My mum has this,,
      She has to take tablets everyday even to move!
      She is very tired also and its very hard for her to cope but she does it!

      I remember once she explained it like this..
      "Say you were going to the beach. You could spend all morning getting yourself ready, getting the children ready, making sandwiches, packing the car. And then when you arrive at the beach you cannot even motivate yourself to get out of the car."

      They say its also harder to lose weight. My mum hardy eats anything but will always remain a size 12/14.

      Tablet consumption is VERY important. If you do get told you have an under-active thyroid make sure you stick to the number of tablets you take. Even if you have no energy and you have taken tablets already do not take more than what your doctor has said.
      My mummies friend also had an under-active thyroid but she now has an over active one due to not taking the proper amount of tablets.

  40. QUESTION:
    what is the relationship berween Thyroid lvels and cholesterol?

    • ANSWER:
      Here is some information about myself, plus some symptoms in case anyone coming upon your question may be interested. I have also given several links below to read & perhaps you can read through & understand the different thyroid symptoms & problems.
      I have low thyroid. I do NOT, however, have any cholesterol problems...other than the fact that I need to excercise more, but my cholesterol levels are great. I have had it for 10 years. I came about after I had my second child. Most people can do well, but myself, if I even miss a day or two, I get super tired, and VERY cranky. My body literally ate up my thyroid...it's almost non-existent. I am on 300mg of levoxyrothin.
      If you have low thyroid...here's a great question to answer: Can you see the floor of your house? That was what was asked of me at one point, and to my amazement, the answer was no!
      Anyway, the signs are:fatigue and lack of energy. Women suffering from underactive thyroid experience heavier menstrual periods. Sluggishness and forgetfulness are symptoms of underactive thyroid problem. Other symptoms of this thyroid disorder are dry skin and hair and constipation.
      If you have high thyroid, or an overactive one, the signs are: increased body metabolism. This is followed by weight loss and excessive warmth and sweating. Persons suffering from overactive thyroid experience trembling hands, irritability and rapid heartbeat or palpitations. Women with overactive thyroid or hyperthyroidism may experience shorter or lighter menstrual periods.
      I take medication, and sadly will have to take 1 pill everyday for the rest of my life. There's a blood check that they will do to see if you have low or high. I hope i've helped you!!

  41. QUESTION:
    underactive thyroid gland?
    I've recently become aware of the condition of having an under-active thyroid gland, and after doing some more research i've noticed i seem to have quite a few of the symptoms and would appreciate any opinions
    ok for starters, i'm a 14 year old girl so excuse my lazy spelling/punctuation. for the past few years my weight has very much been up and down, as a child i was thin/normal, then age 9 i began to gain alot of weight with no chances to my lifestyle. i began puberty very early, beginning my period at the age of 10 years and about 2 months. by this age i was already 5 foot 3. i was far more 'curvy' and 'developed' than all the girls in my class, thus making me very self concious. through the last year of primary school i would say i was a womens size 14 roughly. however i had enough of being chubby and began losing weight through the last months. high school began in september and this is where my weight problem really came to light. believing i was fat, i would excessively exercise and miss breakfast, throw away my sandwiches for dinner, then try and miss tea, or eat a very low calorie meal. by parents began getting concerned but i assured them i was not starving myself. i must have lost around 3 stone within the space of several months, and i began wearing womens clothes size 6 - 8. i was much happier with my new thinner self. however, now not realising how easy it was to gain the weight back, i began binge eating. and when i say binge eating, i mean binge eating! all through year8 i gained weight, then by the end of year8 i was back up to a size 12. i am still on the diet now which i began in around december 2011. i eat a healthy breakfast, salad sandwiches at school , some fruit when i get home and then my tea.i am very cautious of what i eat, like i wont touch macdonalds or chocolate or fried food, etc. ontop of this i do pilates everyday, extra curriculum sport and have sessions on our cross trainer. at my heaviest in 2011 i was over 10 and a half stone, i am now down to about 9 and a half, but go between that and about 9 stone 4 pounds. however i have reached a point where i dont seem to be losing any more weight even though i exercise well and have a good balanced diet...
    ok now to the idea of having an underactive thyroid gland, for a year now i have had very dry, sore eyes,which caused me to develop an on and off habit of blinking very fast and hard. i have a sufficient amount of sleep every night, having around 8 hours on a school night and 12 on a weekend. however all through the day i still feel extremely tired, drained and lousy. i have an unusually deep voice for a girl, which i have had a few comments about but everyones used to it now. i get very paranoid about things! i worry wayyyyy too much! my periods are very heavy, painful and irregular. i have dry skin on my legs, arms and in particular on my hands, my legs even look slightly scaley. with the eating though, ive noticed my friends eat fuck loads more than me, but still remain very thin! i have a fairly muscular build.. which i also get questioned about how i am so muscly for a girl.. which i don't know why. i get fairly depressed at times, however i think that just all comes with hormones!! & i don't know if this is relevant, but i havnt grown in height or shoe size since starting my period,which i think is in my genes. i am also unaware whether i have any family history of thyroid problems.

    i apologise for writing so much! and just to mention; if your going to give me a lecture on how i'm only 14 and shouldn't be dieting etc; its more of a lifestyle change than a diet, and my parents are aware obviously and are supporting me for being sensible in trying to get myself healthy without taking it too extreme.

    thanks!

    • ANSWER:

  42. QUESTION:
    Thyroid problem or what?
    Any health care professional that knows what's wrong or have any suggestions. I'm a 24 year old male that has been having insomnia and heat intolerance problems for about 1.5 year. I've been sweating a bit more than usual during the day if I am at work sitting down or even standing in line at the store. Even on cold days.This is mainly during the day and I seem to have difficulty sleeping every night. I am fatigued sometimes, but it's hard for me to even go to sleep. I've asked several people and they told me I may have a thyroid problem. Is that what it is or can it be something else. I've have a blood test concerning hepatitis panels & STDs and they all came back normal. Any ideas on remedies or what I am suffering from, please let me know.thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I have an extremely low thryoid and I have the same problem as you, also I'm a type 2 diabetic.
      Go to the doctor and have blood work done...

      Original Article:http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hypothyroidism/DS00353
      Hypothyroidism
      Introduction

      Your thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland located at the base of your neck, just below your Adam's apple. Hormones produced by the thyroid gland have an enormous impact on your health, affecting all aspects of your metabolism — from the rate at which your heart beats to how quickly you burn calories.

      As long as your thyroid releases the proper amounts of these hormones, your system functions normally. But sometimes your thyroid doesn't produce enough hormones, upsetting the balance of chemical reactions in your body. This condition is known as hypothyroidism, or underactive thyroid disease.

      Women, especially those older than 50, are more likely to have hypothyroidism than men are. Hypothyroidism seldom causes symptoms in the early stages, but over time, untreated hypothyroidism can cause a number of health problems, such as obesity, joint pain, infertility and heart disease.

      The good news is that accurate thyroid function tests are available to diagnose hypothyroidism, and treatment of hypothyroidism with synthetic thyroid hormone is usually simple and effective once the proper dosage is established.
      Signs and symptoms
      CLICK TO ENLARGE
      Illustration showing thyroid gland Thyroid

      The signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism vary widely, depending on the severity of the hormone deficiency. But in general, any problems you do have tend to develop slowly, often over a number of years.

      At first, you may barely notice symptoms such as fatigue and sluggishness, or you may simply attribute them to getting older. But as your metabolism continues to slow, you may develop more obvious signs and symptoms, including:

      * Increased sensitivity to cold
      * Constipation
      * Pale, dry skin
      * A puffy face
      * Hoarse voice
      * An elevated blood cholesterol level
      * Unexplained weight gain
      * Muscle aches, tenderness and stiffness
      * Pain, stiffness or swelling in your joints
      * Muscle weakness
      * Heavier than normal menstrual periods
      * Depression

      When hypothyroidism isn't treated, signs and symptoms can gradually become more severe. Constant stimulation of your thyroid to release more hormones may lead to an enlarged thyroid (goiter). In addition, you may become more forgetful, your thought processes may slow or you may feel depressed.

      Advanced hypothyroidism, known as myxedema, is rare, but when it occurs it can be life-threatening. Signs and symptoms include low blood pressure, decreased breathing, decreased body temperature, unresponsiveness and even coma. In some cases, myxedema can be fatal.

      Hypothyroidism in children and teens
      Although hypothyroidism most often affects middle-aged and older women, anyone can develop the condition, including infants and teenagers. Initially, babies born without a thyroid gland or with a gland that doesn't work properly may have few signs and symptoms. When newborns do have problems with hypothyroidism, they may include:

      * Yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice). In most cases, this occurs when a baby's liver can't metabolize a molecule called bilirubin, which normally forms when the body recycles old or damaged red blood cells.
      * Frequent choking.
      * A large, protruding tongue.

      As the disease progresses, infants are likely to have trouble feeding and may fail to grow and develop normally. They may also have:

      * Constipation
      * Poor muscle tone
      * Excessive sleepiness

      When hypothyroidism in infants isn't treated, even mild cases can lead to severe physical and mental retardation.

      In general, children and teens who develop hypothyroidism have the same signs and symptoms as adults do, but they may also experience:

      * Poor growth, resulting in short stature
      * Delayed development of permanent teeth
      * Delayed puberty
      * Poor mental development

      Causes

      Your thyroid gland produces two main hormones, thyroxine (T-4) and triiodothyronine (T-3), that influence every cell in your body. They maintain the rate at which your body uses fats and carbohydrates, help control your body temperature, influence your heart rate and help regulate the production of protein. Your thyroid gland also produces calcitonin, a hormone that regulates the amount of calcium in your blood.

      The rate at which thyroxine and triiodothyronine are released is controlled by your pituitary gland and your hypothalamus — an area at the base of your brain that acts as a thermostat for your whole system. The hypothalamus signals your pituitary gland to make a hormone called thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Your pituitary gland then releases TSH — the amount depends on how much thyroxine and triiodothyronine are in your blood. Finally, your thyroid gland regulates its production of hormones based on the amount of TSH it receives.

      Although this process usually works well, the thyroid sometimes fails to produce enough hormones. This may be due to a number of different factors, including:

      * Autoimmune disease (Hashimoto's thyroiditis). Autoimmune disorders occur when your immune system produces antibodies that attack your own tissues. Sometimes this process occurs within the thyroid gland. Scientists aren't sure why the body produces antibodies against itself. Some think a virus or bacteria might trigger the response, while others believe a genetic flaw may be involved. Most likely, autoimmune diseases result from more than one factor. But however it happens, these antibodies affect the thyroid's ability to produce hormones.
      * Treatment for hyperthyroidism. People who produce too much thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism) are often treated with radioactive iodine or anti-thyroid medications to reduce their thyroid function. However, function can be reduced too much, resulting in hypothyroidism.
      * Radiation therapy. Radiation used to treat cancers of the head and neck can affect your thyroid gland and may lead to hypothyroidism.
      * Thyroid surgery. Removing all or a large portion of your thyroid can diminish or halt hormone production. In that case, you'll need to take thyroid hormones for life.
      * Medications. A number of medications can contribute to hypothyroidism. One such medication is lithium, which is used to treat certain psychiatric disorders. If you're taking medication, ask your doctor about its effect on your thyroid gland.

      Less often, hypothyroidism may result from one of the following:

      * Congenital disease. Approximately one in 3,000 babies in the United States is born with a defective thyroid gland or no thyroid gland at all. In most cases, the thyroid gland didn't develop normally for unknown reasons, but some children have an inherited form of the disorder. Often, infants with congenital hypothyroidism appear normal at birth. That's one reason why most states now require newborn thyroid screening.
      * Pituitary disorder. A relatively rare cause of hypothyroidism is the failure of the pituitary gland to produce enough TSH — usually due to a benign tumor of the pituitary gland.
      * Pregnancy. Some women develop hypothyroidism during or after pregnancy (postpartum hypothyroidism), often because they produce antibodies to their own thyroid gland. Left untreated, hypothyroidism increases the risk of miscarriage, premature delivery and preeclampsia — a condition that causes a significant rise in a woman's blood pressure during the last three months of pregnancy. It can also seriously affect the developing fetus.
      * Iodine deficiency. The trace mineral iodine — found primarily in seafood, seaweed, plants grown in iodine-rich soil and iodized salt — is essential for the production of thyroid hormones. In some parts of the world, iodine deficiency is common, but the addition of iodine to table salt has virtually eliminated this problem in the United States.

      Risk factors

      Although anyone can develop hypothyroidism, it occurs mainly in women older than 50, and the risk of developing the disorder increases with age. You also have an increased risk if you:

      * Have a close relative, such as a parent or grandparent, with an autoimmune disease
      * Have been treated with radioactive iodine or anti-thyroid medications
      * Received radiation to your neck or upper chest
      * Have had thyroid surgery (partial thyroidectomy)

      When to seek medical advice

      See your doctor if you're feeling tired for no reason or have any of the other symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as dry skin, a pale, puffy face, constipation or a hoarse voice.

      You'll also need to see your doctor for periodic testing of your thyroid function if you've had previous thyroid surgery, treatment with radioactive iodine or anti-thyroid medications, or radiation therapy to your head, neck or upper chest. However, it may take years or even decades before any of these therapies or procedures result in hypothyroidism.

      If you have high blood cholesterol, talk to your doctor about whether hypothyroidism may be a cause. And if you're receiving hormone therapy for hypothyroidism, schedule follow-up visits as often as your doctor recommends. Initially, it's important to make sure you're receiving the correct dose of medicine. And over time, the dose you need to keep your thyroid functioning normally may change.
      Screening and diagnosis

      Because hypothyroidism is more prevalent in older women, some doctors recommend that older women be screened for the disorder during routine annual physical examinations. Some doctors also recommend that pregnant women or women thinking about becoming pregnant be tested for hypothyroidism.

      In general, your doctor may test for an underactive thyroid if you're feeling increasingly tired or sluggish, have dry skin, constipation and a hoarse voice, or have had previous thyroid problems or goiter.

      Blood tests
      Diagnosis of hypothyroidism is based on your symptoms and the results of blood tests that measure the level of TSH and sometimes the level of the thyroid hormone thyroxine. A low level of thyroxine and high level of TSH indicate an underactive thyroid. That's because your pituitary produces more TSH in an effort to stimulate your thyroid gland into producing more thyroid hormone.

      In the past, doctors weren't able to detect hypothyroidism until symptoms were fairly advanced. But by using the sensitive TSH test, doctors are able to diagnose thyroid disorders much earlier — often before you ever experience symptoms. Because the TSH test is the best screening test, your doctor will likely check TSH first and follow with a thyroid hormone test if needed. TSH tests also play an important role in managing hypothyroidism. They help your doctor determine the right dosage of medication, both initially and over time.

      In addition, TSH tests are used to help diagnose a condition called subclinical hypothyroidism, which usually causes no outward signs or symptoms. In this condition, you have normal blood levels of T-3 and T-4, but higher than normal levels of TSH.
      Complications

      Untreated hypothyroidism can lead to a number of health problems:

      * Goiter. Constant stimulation of your thyroid to release more hormones may cause the gland to become larger — a condition known as goiter. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is one of the most common causes of a goiter. Although generally not uncomfortable, a large goiter can affect your appearance and may interfere with swallowing or breathing.
      * Heart problems. Hypothyroidism may also be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, primarily because high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol — the "bad" cholesterol — can occur in people with an underactive thyroid. Even subclinical hypothyroidism, a more benign condition than true hypothyroidism, can cause an increase in total cholesterol levels and impair the pumping ability of your heart. Hypothyroidism can also lead to an enlarged heart and heart failure.
      * Mental health issues. Depression may occur early in hypothyroidism and may become more severe over time. Hypothyroidism can also cause slowed mental functioning.
      * Myxedema. This rare, life-threatening condition is the result of long-term, undiagnosed hypothyroidism. Its symptoms include intense cold intolerance and drowsiness followed by profound lethargy and unconsciousness. A myxedema coma may be triggered by sedatives, infection or other stress on your body. If you have symptoms of myxedema, you need immediate emergency medical treatment.
      *

      Birth defects. Babies born to women with untreated thyroid disease may have a higher risk of birth defects than do babies born to healthy mothers. These children are more prone to serious intellectual and developmental problems.

      Infants with untreated hypothyroidism present at birth are also at risk of serious problems with both physical and mental development. But if the condition is diagnosed within the first few months of life, the chances of normal development are excellent.

      Treatment

      Standard treatment for an underactive thyroid involves daily use of the synthetic thyroid hormone levothyroxine (Levothroid, Levoxyl, Synthroid, Unithroid). The oral medication restores adequate hormone levels, shifting your body back into normal gear.

      Soon after starting treatment, you'll notice that you're feeling less fatigued. The medication also gradually lowers cholesterol levels elevated by the disease and may reverse any weight gain. Treatment with levothyroxine is usually lifelong, but because the dosage you need may change, your doctor is likely to check your TSH level every year or so.

      To determine the right dosage of levothyroxine initially, your doctor generally checks your level of TSH after two to three months. Excessive amounts of the hormone can cause side effects, such as increased appetite, insomnia, heart palpitations and shakiness.

      If you have coronary artery disease or severe hypothyroidism, your doctor may start treatment with a smaller amount of medication and gradually increase the dosage. Progressive hormone replacement allows your heart to adjust to the increase in metabolism.

      Levothyroxine causes virtually no side effects when used in the appropriate dose and is relatively inexpensive. If you change brands, let your doctor know to ensure you're still receiving the right dosage. Also, don't skip doses or stop taking the drug because you're feeling better. If you do, the symptoms of hypothyroidism will gradually return. People with hypothyroidism need to take medication for the rest of their lives.

      Proper absorption of levothyroxine
      Certain medications, supplements and even some foods may affect your ability to absorb levothyroxine. Talk to your doctor if you eat large amounts of soy products or a high-fiber diet or you take other medications, such as:

      * Iron supplements
      * Cholestyramine (Questran)
      * Aluminum hydroxide, which is found in some antacids

      If you have subclinical hypothyroidism, discuss treatment with your doctor. For a relatively low level of TSH, you probably won't benefit from thyroid hormone therapy, and treatment could even be harmful. On the other hand, for a higher TSH level, thyroid hormones may improve your cholesterol level, the pumping ability of your heart or your energy level.
      Complementary and alternative medicine

      Although most doctors recommend synthetic thyroxine, natural extracts containing thyroid hormone derived from the thyroid glands of pigs are available. These products contain both thyroxine and triiodothyronine. Synthetic thyroid medications contain thyroxine only, and the triiodothyronine your body needs is derived from the thyroxine.

      Extracts are available by prescription only and shouldn't be confused with the glandular concentrates sold in natural foods stores. These products aren't regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, and their potency isn't guaranteed.

  43. QUESTION:
    I want to be tested for hyperthyroidism?
    (mind he.fullstops.please.im typing.on.phone hehe). I am sick to death.of my mum annoying me about my weight. When.i.was.about 11 i suddenly lost loads of weight apparently. I dont remember it well myself but obviously my.family.always told.me.ive lost.weight and surprisingly teacher told me too. But i was never ona diet like accuse.me sometimes. Now, i try to eat as much as.i can but i cant.gain weight. I used fat as.a.child so i havent always.been like.this. Im 13 now and ive.had it. Im tired of "EAT" or "she looks so.weak". I do have.an athletic body shape.too which.is.apparently most rwsistant to weight and i have lots of.muscle. Im nearly underweight, NEARLY. But im just sick of it. Im unnaturally skinny coz i have no cheeks and i look.so.weird from the side of my face.

    Back to my q, i think i have overactive thyroid because my mum also.has a thyroid problem (underactive i think). I do have an irregular heart beat and obviously main symptom - unexplained eeightloss. I really want to get checkd so.i.know.i have a reason for.why im like this. But im.scared my mum wont take me seriously and she'll be like."dont be silly no you havent". Actually she will.be like that abut ill just have to persuade her. What do you think, coult i have it?
    Thanks for that info. So maybe i dont have it

    • ANSWER:
      Jackie is wrong. Autoimmune thyroid diseases run in the same family, whether hypothyroid or hyperthyroid.

      But she is right that it's unlikely, because hyperthyroidism is almost never stable. If you had true hyperthyroidism it would get worse and worse (and it can be really awful).
      You could have had throtoxicity from having a store of thyroid hormone released during destruction of your thyroid- that happens at the onset of about 1 in 10 cases of autoimmune hypothyroidism- but the odds are that if you're okay now, you're okay.

      If you are worried right now because of your difficulty gaining weight, tell your mother that you're really tired of your food issues and would like to speak to a doctor. But first- take a look at this BMI calculator that is for kids. A lot of people think they're underweight or overweight because they are comparing themselves to some other age group. Try yourself here and see if you're surprised:
      http://pediatrics.about.com/cs/usefultools/l/bl_bmi_calc.htm

  44. QUESTION:
    anyone know how to read a thyroid antibodies test?

    • ANSWER:
      as i mentioned in your other question, i do not know how to read this. but, here's some websites that can help you, and some information about me & the symptoms in general. i'm still working to find the right dosage of medication, and i've had it for 10 years! i got it after i had my 2nd child.
      i have low thyroid. if you have low thyroid...here's a great question to answer: can you see the floor of your house? that was what was asked of me at one point, and to my amazement, the answer was no!
      anyway, the signs are:fatigue and lack of energy. Women suffering from underactive thyroid experience heavier menstrual periods. Sluggishness and forgetfulness are symptoms of underactive thyroid problem. Other symptoms of this thyroid disorder are dry skin and hair and constipation.
      if you have high thyroid, or an overactive one, the signs are:increased body metabolism. This is followed by weight loss and excessive warmth and sweating. Persons suffering from overactive thyroid experience trembling hands, irritability and rapid heartbeat or palpitations. Women with overactive thyroid or hyperthyroidism may experience shorter or lighter menstrual periods.
      I take medication, and sadly will have to take 1 pill everyday for the rest of my life. there's a blood check that they will do to see if you have low or high. i hope i've helped you!!

  45. QUESTION:
    thryoid question in children?
    i have a 7 year old daughter and her psychriatrist orderd a blood test to check her thyroid . well he said normal was either 5.5 or 5.7 but her level was 11 now does this mean she has an underactive or overactive thyroid ? and can our family doctor treat her for this or do we need to go to a specalist ?

    • ANSWER:
      Why is she seeing a psychiatrist? Why would he want to test her thyroid? If the level you're talking about is the tsh level, then yes 11 is very high and that indicates hypothyroidism.

      If she's having thyroid problems and psychiatric problem you should probably get her tested for celiac disease. It causes both of those like crazy. It's an autoimmune disease caused by gluten intolerance. Many people only have symptoms like this and don't have intestinal symptoms at all.

  46. QUESTION:
    what are atypical cells in a thyroid biopsy?

    • ANSWER:
      Please don't worry yet...until you get a second opinion. It's like a pap....(if you're a girl) you may have an abnormal pap, get a second one done, and you're fine...but on the other hand, you can have a problem. BUT! You don't know until you get the second opinion/test done.
      In the meantime, here's some information & great links...especially ones that have to do with cancer & understanding thyroid problems more!

      I have low thyroid. I have had it for 10 years. I came about after I had my second child. Most people can do well, but myself, if I even miss a day or two, I get super tired, and VERY cranky. My body literally ate up my thyroid...it's almost non-existent. I am on 300mg of levoxyrothin.
      If you have low thyroid...here's a great question to answer: Can you see the floor of your house? That was what was asked of me at one point, and to my amazement, the answer was no!
      Anyway, the signs are:fatigue and lack of energy. Women suffering from underactive thyroid experience heavier menstrual periods. Sluggishness and forgetfulness are symptoms of underactive thyroid problem. Other symptoms of this thyroid disorder are dry skin and hair and constipation.
      If you have high thyroid, or an overactive one, the signs are: increased body metabolism. This is followed by weight loss and excessive warmth and sweating. Persons suffering from overactive thyroid experience trembling hands, irritability and rapid heartbeat or palpitations. Women with overactive thyroid or hyperthyroidism may experience shorter or lighter menstrual periods.
      I take medication, and sadly will have to take 1 pill everyday for the rest of my life. There's a blood check that they will do to see if you have low or high. I hope i've helped you!!

  47. QUESTION:
    11 days an still no period with negative results yesterday.. but started thinkin, cud underactive thyroids...?
    cud underactive thyroids affect the tests? im supposed to be on thyroxine tablets but i dont take them, (i no stupid thing do, but they make me feel 10 times worse) anyway, thyroids produce hormones, so could that be the reason for negative results? iv never ever missed a period in my life or never late, i do have a child already an i didnt have no pregnancy symptons with her, but these last 2 weeks, all i have felt is really sick, over tired (more than usual, i no underactive corses tirdness) hungry more, boobs dont hurt but feel heavier, feel teary alot lately aswell..

    sorry if it dont make sense, but any advice will be great!

    thanx in advance x

    • ANSWER:
      Hi I was exactly the same. I took a pregnancy test and it showed a very faint positive line. After going to see the nurse the following day she confirmed that I WASNT pregnant as her test was negative. I had all the same symptoms as you. I left it another few days and did another test that confirmed I WAS pregnant! I think it is to early to rely on pregnancy tests 100% and I suggest you give it a few more days before taking another. It certainly sounds to me like you are. I ended up taking about 8 tests before I believed it so just give it a couple more days. I hope you get the result you want xx

  48. QUESTION:
    I am worried about hyperthyroidism?
    There are many symptoms but I only have a few - weigh loss (however, not sudden as it says on some websites) a twitching in my eye, a slight shake of the hand, tiredness and warm skin. I know there are many more symptoms than this, some of them probably larger, but I am worried anyway

    • ANSWER:
      The main symptom of hyperthyroidism(overactive thyroid) is basically what it says - hyper - which means you will be full of energy and never tired, just like a hyperactive child because your thyroid produces to much thyroid hormone which gives you lots of energy, you wont have sudden weight loss but will find it very easy to lose weight without trying. I have hypothyroidism(underactive thyroid) and always tired etc but the medication helps balance out my thyroid hormones and I am slightly overweight and find it very hard to lose it, get it checked out by your doctor, Good Luck

  49. QUESTION:
    Years of fatigue, excessive hunger, and anxiety anyone else with this problem?
    These symptoms have been ruining my life and preventing me from living normally so please real answers only.

    Years of fatigue, excessive hunger, and anxiety
    These symptoms have been ruining my life and preventing me from living normally so please real answers only.

    For two years now I have been suffering from the following symptoms. Extreme fatigue, anxiety, excessive hunger this all began when I was about 4 months pregnant with my second child. Before that I was not tired during the day or needed a nap. I was able to control my appetite and my weight.
    And I was not anxious all the time and did not have a problem with anger and irritability or depression. But ever since after I gave birth and seen a doctor for the symptoms that seemed quite normal during pregnancy turned into something that looked like depression and I was diagnosed with clinical depression.

    The following is the medication that I have been given and used to help me with the symptoms of that time maybe some depression feelings where there: Zoloft, lexapro and wellbutrin XL

    I was also told I have underactive thyroid and an inflamed thyroid and took Synthyroid for 4 months (side effects from Synthyroid excessive sweating, a bit less hungry) other symptoms where still there so then I saw an endocrinologist who tested for insulin, testosterone levels and THS and said everything looks good its not a thyroid problem or insulin but the testosterone was borderline / high which he said for women my age 26 would be at around 25-50 I was at 76.

    So then put me the birth control yasmin to help bring it down. It has not helped with any of my symptoms. I am still very tired all the time and need to take naps during the day I am always hungry and still really irritable and moody.

    I am a stay at home mom so I do not have the lack of sleep from over working and I do not eat because I am bored I actually feel hungry most of the time. All these symptoms have not been a problem anytime in my teenage years and young adult life until the point of my second pregnancy.

    I am thinking but I am not sure I am not a doctor. that a big possibility for all the other symptoms is the cause from the fatigue and then I eat to trying to give my body sugar to keep going. Which causes me to get moody irritable then anxious and maybe even a bit of depression because of the weight gain and crash dieting.

    Is there anybody who has had these problems and figured out the cause of the problem and been treaded correctly? I just want to get well, be normal, strong and not tired I do not want to feel so helpless and have this uncontrolled hunger anymore. Please anyone with any suggestions or maybe has seen somebody with these problems what did they do to get better?

    Thank you very much for all your help.

    Sorry for the long writing i just did not want to miss anything that could be the difference between the solution and the underling problem.

    • ANSWER:
      The symptoms you are mentioning would be typical for someone suffering from depression.
      As you told here, all of it started when being pregnant, so the triggering reason for your condition was hormones.

      As you may know (or have realised):
      The symptoms need to be taken care of, what you are experiencing is torture. Common techniques for torturing people use withdrawl of sleep, hunger, pain and anxiety..
      So its only a question of time before you might break and fighting your condition is imperative.

      I would suggest to eliminate any chances for hormone imbalance first.
      Without balanced hormones anything else will fail.
      You might try another pill, or getting off the pill for AT LEAST half a year.

      In addition to that physical exercise (at least 4 times a week for half an hour) and a healthy diet (vegetables and vitamins) will complete the treatment.
      Just dont expect an instant miracle. The condition took some time developing and needs time to "heal" like a physical wound.

      Your best weapon in your fight to get back in control again is perseverance. Pick a date nine months from now and keep up your workout schedule and diet until that day.

  50. QUESTION:
    What should I expect if I have thyroid problems?
    Hi,
    I'm a 27 year old female with 2 children the youngest of which is 2 years old.

    I have gained a lot of weight in the last 9 months and have been feeling increasingly exhausted and low and my nurse thinks I may have an underactive thyroid.

    I had my blood test on Friday and am nervously awaiting my results.

    Whilst waiting I have been doing a lot of reading and am quite convinced I have thyroid problems due to the following reasons

    -I had a miscarriage 3 months ago.
    -Since my 2 year old was born I have been progressively more exhausted , no amount of sleep is enough.
    -My periods have been awful since my 2 year old was born. I have even spent the day throwing up and in pain the day before I was due. Also I have a pain in my shoulder a couple of days before my period arrives now
    -My neck feels puffy and uncomfortable.
    -I am bloated and constipated all of the time even though I eat my five a day and drink plenty of water. I haven't been making a pig of myself.

    Is there anyone else out there with experience of having an underactive thyroid?
    How does the medication work for you?
    Did you manage to lose weight gained when on medication and do you feel better?

    I know I may or may not have a thyroid problems , but I would just like to know what I am facing if the blood tests come back leaning towards it.

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      i was diagnosed hypo- thyroid about 5 yrs ago. i experienced MASSIVE hair thinning and hair loss.
      I got tired very easily.
      i gained alot of weight.
      very irritable and bitchy.
      bloating and const. prob a symptom of your periods, thats all. i get that way too.
      i have a very sore shoulder too. not sure why that is. maybe age, i am 49. youre very young to have this problem! you will have to be on the meds for the rest of your life :( Once on it, DO NOT EVER miss a dosage. i keep the pills on my kitchen counter in plain sight.

      i got on Synthroid and lost the weight and hair started to not fall out as much. I'm still tired alot but that's just because i am a night owl. i felt alot better all around. get your TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) levels checked immediately, then go see a ENDOCRONOLOGIST with those results. Not controlling your thyroid can lead to stroke, heart disease or worse, coma, if left untreated. Best of luck to you!!

symptom of underactive thyroid in children

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