How Are Anemia And Hypothyroidism Related

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How can Hypothyroidism affect my vision?
    Here's the scenario: I'm 26 years old, female, no children, and I've had hypothyroidism related to pernicious anemia for about 5 1/2 years. I decided to do some research- just out of curiosity- and I've had trouble finding documentation of how hypothyroidism affects vision. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Mainly with dry eyes...which can make it difficult to focus and possibly lead to scratched/ulcerated corneas.

  2. QUESTION:
    What are some good energy-boosting vitamin brands?
    I generally feel as though I am lacking in energy. I think that I get enough rest and I exercise moderately ( about 3 times per week). I take vitamin supplements but I know that there are some brands that have really good energy-boosting combinations. I'd like to know which ones are the best.
    Polite, sincere, constructive answers only please.

    • ANSWER:
      Vitamins, if you are taking enough now, will not boost your energy.

      Energy comes from fuel (eating) and combustion (metabolism).

      Lack of energy can be a symptom of a number of things, including anemia, low thyroid, low blood sugar, low insulin supply, and parasites.

      Anemia and hypothyroidism are easy to diagnose. The blood sugar and insulin levels are tested together, as related to possible diabetes. Parasites are a long shot but not impossible.

      You body is like a car (but of course much more complicated). Sometimes just adding something to the fuel will not take care of the problem; sometimes it's the carburetor or the fuel pump or the transmission that is reducing its pep.

  3. QUESTION:
    What is this weird bubbling sound in my ear?
    It almost sounds like shampoo bubbles popping in my ear. I don't really have any other symptoms to indicate an illness, just the bubbly sound. I tried taking Sudafed, hoping that would help, it didn't
    Does anyone have any ideas what it is, or what would help?
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      The symptom is called Tinnitus. Can be caused by diseases inside or outside the ear.
      Common ear conditions:
      # Blocked ear canal

      # Blocked eustachian tube The passage that connects the middle ear and the back of the nose. It acts as a drainage way for the middle ear and regulates the pressure between the middle ear and the outside environment.

      # Ear infection

      # Otosclerosis A common ear disorder characterized by unusual stiffness or lack of flexibility of the tiny bones of the middle ear. This condition frequently causes tinnitus.: a common ear disorder characterized by unusual stiffness or lack of flexibility of the tine bones of the middle ear. This condition frequently causes tinnitus.

      # Meniere's disease A disorder of the inner ear characterized by recurrent dizziness, deafness, and tinnitus.

      # Damage caused by certain drugs, including aspirin and certain antibiotics

      # Hearing loss.

      Other Causes:

      # Anemia,
      # Hypertension, or high blood pressure
      # Arteriosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries.
      # Hypothyroidism, or low levels of thyroid hormone producti
      # Presbycusis: hearing loss and other hearing problems related to advanced age.
      # Head injury

  4. QUESTION:
    what are the causes of hearty palpitations?
    palpitations, heart flutters, like your heart drops in your chest likes its drowning and then goes back to normal? are these typical problems people have every now and then particularly when they get older?

    • ANSWER:
      It is normal to hear or feel your heart "pounding" as it beats faster when you exercise or do other physical activities. But if you have palpitations, you might feel your heart beating fast while you are just sitting still or moving slowly.
      Many things can cause palpitations. Some causes of heart palpitations include the following:

      Heart-related causes. People with an irregular heartbeat or arrhythmia may also have palpitations. (Arrhythmia is a change in the rhythm of your heartbeat.) Most of the time, palpitations and irregular heartbeats are harmless. However, sometimes the break in your heart's normal rhythm can be a serious problem. You also may have palpitations if you have problems with the valves in your heart. Valves help move blood through the heart.

      Non-heart-related causes. Certain medicines, herbal supplements and illegal street drugs can make your heart beat faster. Medicines that can cause palpitations include asthma inhalers and decongestants. Caffeine (found in coffee, tea and soda), alcohol and tobacco can also cause palpitations. People who have panic disorder feel their heart pounding when they are fearful of something or having a panic attack. Some medical conditions, such as thyroid disease and anemia, also can cause palpitations.

      Sometimes the cause of palpitations cannot be found. This happens in about 1 of every 7 people who have palpitations. Palpitations in these people usually are not harmful.

      The term "palpitations" loosely means any time a person can sense their own heartbeat, and believes it to be unusual or abnormal. Thus, palpitations may be used by patients to describe racing heartbeat, rapid heart beat, slow heart beat, irregular heartbeat, and various arrhythmias.

      Other causes can be:

      The following medical conditions are some of the possible causes of Palpitations. There are likely to be other possible causes, so ask your doctor about your symptoms.

      Some non-disorder reasons for palpitations may include:
      Anxiety
      Fear
      Stress
      Memory of a traumatic event - such as an association of a trauma causing a heart jump from temporary anxiety every time it's seen again.
      Poor physical condition - may calse "palpitations" on exertion or exercise.
      Psychological disorders that may cause palpitation symptoms include:
      Panic attack
      Panic disorder
      Anxiety disorders - may types of anxiety disorders may cause palpitations from anxiety.
      Generalized anxiety disorder
      Sexual aversion disorder
      Excessive caffeine
      Excessive alcohol
      Indigestion - one reader reports that indigestion leading to gas brings on palpitations
      Arrhythmias
      Tachycardia
      Bradycardia
      Atrial fibrillation
      Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation
      Paroxysmal atrial tachycardia (type of Tachycardia)
      Supraventricular tachycardia
      Ventricular tachycardia (type of Arrhythmias)
      Complete heart block
      Holiday heart syndrome - usually due to early alcohol ingestion.
      Click-murmur syndrome
      Digitalis-induced arrhythmia
      Heart disorders
      Heart disease
      Coronary artery disease
      Heart valve disease
      Heart ischemia
      Myocardiopathy
      Complications of heart attack
      Rheumatic carditis
      Mitral valve prolapse
      Congestive heart failure
      Cardiomyopathy
      Dilated cardiomyopathy
      Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy
      Heart conduction abnormalities
      Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome
      Sick sinus syndrome
      Functional palpitations
      Hypoglycemia
      Hypoglycemic attack
      Reactive hypoglycemia (type of Hypoglycemia)
      Hyperthyroidism
      Hypoxia
      Hyperventilation
      Infiltrative myocardial diseases
      Amyloidosis
      Sarcoidosis
      Heart tumor
      Hypothyroidism - can cause sinus bradycardia
      Anemia
      Perimenopause - the pre-menopause phase can cause palpitations.
      Strenuous exercise
      Certain drugs and substances
      See also causes of palpitations
      Acute anxiety attack
      Cardiac arrhythmias
      Hypertension
      Hypocalcemia
      Mitral stenosis
      Thyrotoxicosis
      Da Costa syndrome
      Phaeochromocytoma
      Caffeine poisoning
      Dumping syndrome

      For more information see the source below.

  5. QUESTION:
    What causes temporary hearing loss and ringing?
    What causes my one ear to sometime have a high pitch ringing, and loss of hearing for about a minute at the most? It is also slightly blocked, and has been for over 2 months.

    • ANSWER:
      Ringing of the ear is called Tinnitus.
      Inside your inner ear, thousands of auditory cells maintain an electrical charge. Microscopic hairs form a fringe on the surface of each auditory cell. When they're healthy, these hairs move in relation to the pressure of sound waves. The movement triggers the cell to discharge electricity through the auditory nerve. Your brain interprets these signals as sound.

      If the delicate hairs inside your inner ear are bent or broken, they move randomly in a constant state of irritation. Unable to hold their charge, the auditory cells "leak" random electrical impulses to your brain as noise.

      Damage to auditory cells in your inner ear most commonly results from:

      Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis). This process usually begins around age 60.
      Noise-related damage to your inner ear. This erosion of your hearing ability may result from excessive exposure to loud noise over a long period of time. Tractors, chain saws and weapons are common sources of noise-related hearing loss. Portable music devices, such as MP3 players or iPods, may become a common source of noise-related hearing loss in the future if people play these devices loudly for long periods.
      Other causes of tinnitus may include:

      Long-term use of certain medications. Aspirin used in large doses and certain types of antibiotics can affect inner ear cells. Often the unwanted noise disappears when you stop using these drugs.
      Changes in ear bones. Stiffening of the bones in your middle ear (otosclerosis) may affect your hearing.
      Injury. Trauma to your head or neck can damage your inner ear.
      Certain disorders of your blood vessels can cause a type of tinnitus called pulsatile tinnitus. These may include:

      Atherosclerosis. With age and buildup of cholesterol and other fatty deposits, major blood vessels close to your middle and inner ear lose some of their elasticity — the ability to flex or expand slightly with each heartbeat. That causes blood flow to become more forceful and sometimes more turbulent, making it easier for your ear to detect the beats.
      High blood pressure. Hypertension and factors that increase blood pressure, such as stress, alcohol and caffeine, can make the sound more noticeable. Repositioning your head usually causes the sound to disappear.
      Turbulent blood flow. Narrowing or kinking in a carotid artery or jugular vein can cause turbulent blood flow and head noise.
      Malformation of capillaries. A condition called A-V malformation, which occurs in the connections between arteries and veins, can result in head noise.
      Head and neck tumors. Tinnitus may be a symptom of a tumor in your head or neck.

      So as not to cause panic. Maybe it's just a simple case of water trapped in your ear. or an infection called otitis media. It would be prudent for you to go see an EENT for proper diagnosis. and treatment. All you need might only be an ear irrigation.

      Tinnitus is usually caused by a head injury, an infection, such as colds or sinus infection or sinusitis, a disease or exposure to loud sounds such as gunshots and explosions.

      It can be a sign of hearing loss, or it can result from head injuries, or diseases that range from the common cold to diabetes. People who work with noisy equipment, such as power tools, can also get it. Or tinnitus may be initiated by a single loud noise, such as a gunshot or an explosion. It can also be a symptom of almost any ear disorder, including the following:

      Ear infections
      Blocked ear canal
      Blocked eustachian tube
      Otosolerosis
      Tumors of the middle ear
      Meniere's disease
      Damage to the ear caused by drugs (such as aspirin and some antibiotics)
      Hearing loss
      Blast injury from a blast or explosion

      Tinnitus may also occur with other disorders such as anemia, heart and blood vessel disorders including hypertension and arteriosclerosis, and low thyroid hormone levels in the blood (hypothyroidism).

      A wide variety of conditions and illnesses can lead to tinnitus. Blockages of the ear due to a buildup of wax, an infection (Otitis Media), or rarely, a tumor of the auditory nerve can cause the unwanted sounds. A perforated eardrum also could be the culprit. The most common source of chronic tinnitus is prolonged exposure to loud sounds from sources such as blaring radios, gunshots, jackhammers, industrial machinery, rock concerts, etc. The noise causes permanent damage to the sound-sensitive cells of the cochlea, a spiral- shaped organ in the inner ear. A single exposure to a sudden extremely loud noise can also cause tinnitus.

      In sensitive people, the mercury in common amalgam dental fillings can lead to tinnitus. The ringing could also be a signal that the body is overwhelmed with stress and work.

      Temporary tinnitus can also results from loose ear hair or a fragment from a recent haircut. They get deposited close to the ear drum, vibrate and create thunderous notes.

      Sinus congestion, antibiotics, aspirin, barbiturates, quinine containing medications, exposure to chemicals such as carbon monoxide from gasoline fumes or the benzene used by dry cleaners, or by excessive consumption of aspirin, alcohol, or caffeine can also results in tinnitus. In fact, tinnitus is cited as a potential side effect for about 200 prescription and nonprescription drugs. In these cases, the tinnitus usually disappears when the underlying triggers are controlled, limited, or avoided.

      Exercise can cause tinnitus by disrupting the auditory system's normal function. According to the New England Journal of Medicine (February 1991), ringing in the ears may result from the jarring force of high-impact exercises.

      The natural process of aging can result in a deterioration of the cochlea (hearing organ) or other parts of the ear and lead to tinnitus. Tinnitus is also associated with Meniere's disease, a disorder of the inner ear, and otosclerosis, a degenerative disease of the small bones in the middle ear. Tinnitus can also be a symptom of a disorder of the neck or jaw, such as temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ).

      For reasons not yet entirely clear to researchers, stress seems to worsen tinnitus.
      In your case, probably it's due to a head cold.

  6. QUESTION:
    How often do you drink coffee and what are the reactions you have after drinking?

    • ANSWER:
      I generally stay away from coffee and only drink decaf.

      It makes me hyperactive, "edgy" with a false feeling of energy, gives me a sort of rambling thought of flow (I think really quickly), it increases my anxiety, etc. etc... and if I drink it regularly I begin to build up a tolerance. Also, according to my doctor I once actually EXHAUSTED my adrenals from abusing coffee (coffee stimulates your adrenal glands to release stress hormones which is the pick-me-up effect it has), which was ironically leading to an endogenous depression and overall lack of energy, which is why I'm very moderate and careful with it nowadays.

      I personally think that if you NEED coffee to get up in the morning, something's wrong with your body - your diet must be seriously lacking (i.e. energy-related vitamins or calories [energy] in general), you do not sleep enough, or you have some sort of condition like anemia, hypoglycemia, chronic fatigue syndrome or hypothyroidism. Humans are not naturally born overstimulated and do not need caffeine to function optimally.

  7. QUESTION:
    What are the side affects from Levoxyl?
    I have just been diagnosed with a underactive thyroid disease. I am aslo anemic, I am a 23/f and weigh 97 pounds. Do you think I will lose any weight from having to take this medication?I only have to take 50 mcg instead of the hole 100 mcg because taking the hole pill would be too much for my body. I do have to take this medication the rest of my life!Please if anyone knows what the side affects are let me know because my doctor gave me samples for 3 months, and when I got home the paper to the medicine wasn't in there, and it is 5:30 and it's too late to call the doctor. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Levoxyl is a synthetic form of a thyroid hormone. The drug should be taken on an empty stomach, either 1 hour before breakfast in the morning, or 3 hours after your last meal.

      Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) may be related to your anemia.

      Here are some instruction for the medication

      How should I take levothyroxine?

      Take this medication exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist to explain them to you.
      Take each dose with a full glass (8 ounces) of water.

      Take this medication at the same time each day whenever possible. Thyroid hormone is usually taken in the morning to prevent insomnia at night. Follow your doctor's instructions.

      It is important to take levothyroxine regularly to get the most benefit.

      Do not stop taking this medication without talking to your doctor. It is important to take this medication to replace the thyroid hormone that the body is not producing. Even if you feel well, you may still need to take this medicine every day.
      Do not change brands or change to a generic levothyroxine drug product without first talking to your doctor. Some levothyroxine products may not be interchangeable.

      Your doctor may want you to have blood tests or other medical evaluations during treatment with levothyroxine to monitor progress and side effects.
      Store levothyroxine at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

      Symptoms of a levothyroxine overdose may include chest pain, nervousness, trouble sleeping, tremor, rapid heartbeat, nausea, headache, fever, sweating, shortness of breath, heat intolerance, irregular menses, increased appetite, decreased weight, diarrhea, and abdominal pain.

      Besides an overdose the only other side effects would be allergic reactions.

      You may wish to see and endocrinologist, a specialist who deals with metabolism.

      For some reason giving you samples for 3 months and having you split pills doesn't sit well with me. I feel he should have written you a prescription and planned on seeing you within 6 weeks to see your progress.

      I had my thyroid removed after thyroid cancer, and have been on thyroid medication ever since.

      Just a response to the person who mentioned armor thyroid, it is a natural thyroid medication taken from pig's thyroid and some people feel much better on it than just taking what your doctor gave you. For many people it makes no difference.

  8. QUESTION:
    Loss of the sense of the smell often precedes the major symptoms of Alezheimer disease and...?
    Parkinson's disease. What additonal information is needed to use this assocation to prevent or treat these diseases?

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, the loss of the sense of smell, ansomia, occurs during Alzheimer's, it is usually not a precursor symptom as it can be in Parkinson's disease. There might be some instances where it precedes AD, but the medical inclination would be to look at other conditions, especially PD.

      When it is found, it is important that the patient list every symptom they have noticed no matter how unrelated they may seem. Since the blood test for PD has not reached the market yet and there are no other tests to quantify the disease, it would be important to refer the patient to a neurologist who specializes in motion disorders despite the fact that ansomia is a non-motor symptom of PD.

      Anosmia itself can have several causes and related conditions. That symptom alone is not enough to direct attention to PD but with what is known now, it should be AFTER ruling out other conditions:
      http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/symptoms/anosmia/book-causes-8a.htm
      From the site above:
      "Begin the patient history by asking about the onset and duration of anosmia and related signs and symptoms—stuffy nose, nasal discharge or bleeding, postnasal drip, sneezing, dry or sore mouth and throat, loss of sense of taste or appetite, excessive tearing, and facial or eye pain. Pinpoint any history of nasal disease, allergies, or head trauma. Ask about heavy smoking and the use of prescribed or over-the-counter nose drops or nasal sprays. Be sure to rule out cocaine use.

      Inspect and palpate nasal structures for obvious injury, inflammation, deformities, and septal deviation or perforation. Observe the contour and color of the nasal mucosa and the size and color of the turbinates. Check for polyps, which appear as translucent white masses around the middle meatus. Note the source and character of any nasal discharge. Palpate the sinus areas for tenderness and contour.
      Assess the patient for nasal obstruction by occluding one nostril at a time with your thumb as the patient breathes quietly; listen for breath sounds and for sounds of moisture or mucus. Test olfactory nerve (cranial nerve I) function by having the patient identify common odors."

      As the medical profession as a whole begins to think outside the box until it becomes inside the box and has specific testing procedures for PD, it is partly up to the patient not to accept "well it isn't this" without finding out what "it" is.

      From Wrong Diagnosis.com are questions which the medical team should be asking:
      ANOSMIA OR UNUSUAL ODORS: Ask the following questions:
      (Algorithmic Diagnosis of Symptoms and Signs)

      1.Is it acute or chronic? Acute loss of smell would certainly suggest an acute upper respiratory infection (URI). It would also suggest recent exposure to toxic fumes or recent head injury. If the anosmia or unusual odor is intermittent, then one should consider psychomotor epilepsy.
      2.Is there a history of trauma? A skull fracture, particularly if it involves the cribriform plate, may interrupt the olfactory nerves and cause anosmia.
      3.Is there a history of drug use or overuse of nasal sprays? Captopril and penicillamine may cause anosmia. Overuse of alcohol or tobacco may also be the problem. Anti-rheumatic and antiproliferative drugs are also known to cause anosmia.
      4.Is the anosmia unilateral or bilateral? If there is unilateral anosmia, one should consider an olfactory groove meningioma.
      5.Are there other neurologic signs? Multifocal neurologic signs should suggest multiple sclerosis, and additional neurologic signs such as memory loss should suggest an olfactory groove meningioma or parietal lobe tumor.
      6.Are there signs of a systemic disease? Many systemic diseases may cause anosmia, including hypothyroidism, diabetes, renal failure, hepatic failure, and pernicious anemia
      http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/a/anosmia/diagnosis.htm

  9. QUESTION:
    Why do I have so many symptoms?
    I am 18 years old and have lots of things that seem to be wrong with me. I get frequent headaches, once or more a day, have extremely bad floaters in my eyes, a ping pong sized lump in my left breast, chronic gas, and recently I have been having extreme middle back pain. I also am constantly fatigued; I never have any energy. I exercise frequently but it does no good for my energy.

    Could these be linked together?
    I hope you're kidding Barbara G- I'm a lesbian: I'm NOT pregnant.

    I don't have health insurance right now and I don't want my doctor to think I'm a hypochondriac.
    Are you kidding me... Santana O... I am a lesbian. It has been two years since I have slept with a man. I AM NOT PREGNANT.

    • ANSWER:
      You're right; there are a lot of things "wrong". Some of these symptoms may be related. Some of the more vague symptoms, like headaches, fatigue, and gas, may be caused separately, or together, by so many different variables they cannot be listed here. HIV, chronic fatigue syndrome, Epstein-Barr virus (mononucleosis), cytomegalovirus, anemia, hypothyroidism, Lyme disease, fibromyalgia, gall bladder disease, irritable bowel syndrome.... you get the idea.

      Only your physician can tie these symptoms together and give you a diagnosis. You aren't a hypochondriac. It's time to see a doctor!

      I can, however, tell you about "floaters" at p://www.drkoop.com/encyclopedia/93/426.html#causes

  10. QUESTION:
    What causes pins and needles followed by numbness ?

    • ANSWER:
      Best Answer - Chosen by Asker
      Pins and needles' (paraesthesia) is a sensation of uncomfortable tingling or prickling, usually felt in the hands or feet. The affected area is sometimes said to have 'fallen asleep'. A common cause is leaning or lying awkwardly on a limb, which either presses against the nerves or reduces the blood supply to the local area. Changing position quickly restores normal feeling. Any numbness is soon replaced by the tingling and prickling sensation, as the nerves start sending messages again to the brain and spinal cord. In some cases, pins and needles are caused by nerve damage or certain disorders of the central nervous system. Always see your doctor if you experience frequent or persistent bouts of pins and needles.

      Symptoms
      The symptoms of pins and needles include:

      * Hands and feet are usually affected
      * Initial numbness and heaviness
      * Prickling and tingling sensation on the skin
      * Return of normal feeling a few minutes after changing position.

      A range of causes
      Pins and needles can be caused by a wide range of events and conditions, including:

      * Pressure on nerves
      * Reduced blood supply
      * Nerve injury
      * Hyperventilation or breathing excessively
      * The effect of toxic substances on the nerves, such as alcohol or lead
      * Certain medications
      * Diabetes
      * Multiple sclerosis
      * Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid gland)
      * Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA)
      * Stroke.

      Pressure-related pins and needles
      The peripheral nerves of the body send information back to the brain and spinal cord. When a sensory nerve is pressed by a cramped or awkward position, its functioning starts to falter. In time, the affected limb 'falls asleep', which means the sensory messages are blocked. Once pressure is taken off the nerve, functioning resumes. The uncomfortable prickling sensation is caused by the resumption of pain messages from nerves to the brain. Other nerves, such as those that provide information on temperature, take a little longer to recover.

      Pinched nerve
      Nerves can be pinched by bones and other tissue. Some examples include:

      * Carpal tunnel syndrome - the main nerve that services the hand runs through a ring of wrist bones. Inflamed and swollen tendon membranes reduce the amount of room inside the wrist and squash the nerve. Symptoms include pins and needles, pain and weakness.
      * Cervical nerve root irritation - nerves in the neck exit the spinal cord via small holes between the vertebrae. These small holes can be narrowed by inflammation, trauma or outgrowths of bone tissue (bone spurs). The nerves are compressed, causing pins and needles and, sometimes, referred pain into the arms.
      * Sciatica - the legs and feet are serviced by the sciatic nerve, which starts as four nerve roots between the vertebrae of the lower back. Each vertebra is cushioned by discs of cartilage. A prolapsed or 'slipped' disc bulges out and presses against one of the roots of the sciatic nerve, causing pins and needles and referred pain down the leg.

      Neuritis
      Neuritis is inflammation of the nerves. Some of the causes include:

      * Alcohol - chronic overconsumption of alcohol can be toxic to nerves and cause a condition called peripheral neuropathy, characterised by pins and needles.
      * Guillain-Barre syndrome - thought to be triggered by some kinds of viral infection.
      * Pernicious anaemia - causes a vitamin B12 deficiency that affects the functioning of the spinal cord.

      Nerve disease
      Nerve disease, or neuropathy, is characterised by the lack of sensory information to the brain due to damage of the sensory nerves. For example, a person with neuropathy may not experience pain to the normal degree, if at all. Conditions that may damage the sensory nerves include:

      * Severed spinal cord
      * Diabetes
      * Charcot-Marie-Tooth inherited neuropathy
      * Exposure to certain drugs and heavy metals, such as lead
      * Chronic overconsumption of alcohol.

      Seek medical advice
      The occasional bout of pins and needles is a harmless event. However, chronic pins and needles can be symptomatic of some other underlying disorder. Always see your doctor for a thorough medical investigation if you experience persistent or frequent episodes of numbness or pins and needles.

      Treatment options
      Treatment depends on the cause. For example, carpal tunnel syndrome may be treated with rest, splinting and medications such as anti-inflammatory and diuretic drugs. A nerve pinched by bone or some other tissue may need chiropractic or physiotherapy, or perhaps surgery to ease the pressure and allow full nerve functioning to resume. Underlying conditions such as diabetes need to be properly controlled to ease associated symptoms, including pins and needles. The symptoms of nerve inflammation and damage caused by chronic overconsumption of alcohol generally improve once the person stops drinking.

      Where to get help

      * Your doctor.

      Things to remember

      * 'Pins and needles' is a sensation of uncomforta

  11. QUESTION:
    What are some ways to treat immune disorders? What are some diseases that may develop due to an immune system?

    • ANSWER:
      Autoimmune diseases can affect virtually every site in the body, including the endocrine system, connective tissue, gastrointestinal tract, heart, skin, and kidneys.

      At least 15 diseases are known to be the direct result of an autoimmune response, while circumstantial evidence implicates >80 conditions with autoimmunity There are more than 80 different types of autoimmune disorders.

      Examples of Autoimmune or Autoimmune Related Diseases

      Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). A form of encephalitis caused by an autoimmune reaction and typically occurring a few days or weeks after a viral infection or a vaccination.

      Addison's disease. A disease often caused by autoimmune destruction of the adrenal cortex.

      Ankylosing spondylitis. A chronic, painful, progressive inflammatory arthritis primarily affecting spine and sacroiliac joints, causing eventual fusion of the spine.

      Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). A disease that causes blood clots to form in veins and/or arteries.

      Aplastic anemia. A disease caused by an autoimmune attack on the bone marrow.

      Autoimmune hepatitis. A disorder wherein the liver is the target of the body's own immune system.

      Autoimmune Oophoritis. A disorder in which the immune system attacks the female reproductive organs.

      Celiac disease - sprue. A disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the proximal portion of the small intestine caused by exposure to certain dietary gluten proteins.

      Crohn's disease. A form of inflammatory bowel disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestinal tract causing abdominal pain and diarrhea. There is also a theory that Crohn's Disease is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis.

      Diabetes mellitus type 1. A disorder that is characterized by a deficiency or absence of insulin production (Type I). It is often the consequence of an autoimmune attack on the insulin-producing beta cells in the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas.

      Gestational pemphigoid. A pregnancy-related blistering condition where auto antibodies attack the skin.

      Goodpasture's syndrome. A disease characterized by rapid destruction of the kidneys and hemorrhaging of the lungs through autoimmune reaction against an antigen found in both organs.

      Graves' disease. A disorder of the thyroid caused by anti-thyroid antibodies that stimulate the thyroid into overproduction of thyroid hormone. It is the most common form of hyperthyroidism.

      Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). An acquired immune-mediated inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Also referred to as: acute idiopathic polyradiculoneuritis, acute idiopathic polyneuritis, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and Landry's ascending paralysis.

      Hashimoto's disease. A condition characterized by initial inflammation of the thyroid, and, later, dysfunction and goiter. There are several characteristic antibodies (e.g., anti-thyroglobulin). A common form of hypothyroidism,
      Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. An autoimmune disease where the body produces anti-platelet antibodies resulting in a low platelet count.

      Kawasaki's disease. A disorder caused by an autoimmune attack on the arteries around the heart.

      Lupus erythematosus. A chronic (long-lasting) non organ specific autoimmune disease wherein the immune system becomes hyperactive and attacks normal tissue. This attack results in inflammation and brings about symptoms.

      Mixed Connective Tissue Disease. A disorder that has features of other connective tissues diseases — lupus, polymyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, and scleroderma, diagnosed by the presence of anti-body U1-RNP.

      Multiple sclerosis. A disorder of the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) characterized by decreased nerve function due to myelin loss and secondary axonal damage.

      Myasthenia gravis. A disorder of neuromuscular transmission leading to fluctuating weakness and fatigue. Weakness is caused by circulating antibodies that block (antagonist) acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction.

      Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome (OMS). A neurological disorder that appears to the result of an autoimmune attack on the nervous system. Symptoms include ataxia, intention tremor, dysphasia, dysarthria, myoclonus, mutism, hypotonia, opsoclonus, lethargy, irritability or malaise. About half of all OMS cases occur in association with neuroblastoma.

      Optic neuritis. An inflammation of the optic nerve that may cause a complete or partial loss of vision.

      Ord's thyroiditis. Thyroiditis similar to Hashimoto's disease, except that the thyroid is reduced in size.

      Pemphigus. An autoimmune disorder that causes blistering and raw sores on skin and mucous membranes.

      Pernicious anaemia. An autoimmune disorder characterized by anemia due to malabsorption of vitamin B12

      Primary biliary cirrhosis. An autoimmune disease that affects the biliary epithelial cells (BECs) of the small bile duct in the liver. Although the cause is yet to be determined, most of the patients (>90%) appear to have auto-mitochondrial anti-bodies (AMAs) against pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC), an enzyme that is found in the mitochondria.

      Rheumatoid arthritis. An autoimmune disorder that causes the body's immune system to attack the bone joints.

      Reiter's syndrome. An autoimmune disease affecting various body systems in response to a bacterial infection and the body's confusion over the HLA-B27 marker .

      Sjögren's syndrome. An autoimmune disorder in which immune cells attack and destroy the exocrine glands that produce tears and saliva.

      Takayasu's arteritis. An auto immune disorder that results in the narrowing of the lumen of arteries.

      Temporal arteritis (also known as "giant cell arteritis"). An inflammation of blood vessels, most commonly the large and medium arteries of the head. Untreated, the disorder can lead to significant vision loss.

      Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia. A auto immune disorder characterized by IgM attack against red blood cells

      Wegener's granulomatosis . A form of vasculitis that affects the lungs, kidneys and other organs.

      Diseases suspected or theorized to be linked to autoimmunity are:

      Alopecia universalis

      Behçet's disease

      Chagas' disease

      Chronic fatigue syndrome

      Dysautonomia

      Endometriosis

      Hidradenitis suppurativa

      Interstitial cystitis

      Lyme disease

      Morphea

      Neuromyotonia

      Narcolepsy

      Psoriasis

      Sarcoidosis

      Schizophrenia

      Scleroderma

      Ulcerative colitis

      Uveitis

      Vitiligo

      Vulvodynia

      Treatment

      There is no known prevention for most autoimmune disorders. The goals of treatment are to reduce symptoms and control the autoimmune process while maintaining the body's ability to fight disease. Treatments vary widely and depend on the specific disease and your symptoms.For instance:

      If the autoimmune disorder affects the blood, the person may need blood transfusions. Measures to help with movement or other functions may be needed for autoimmune disorders that affect the bones, joints, or muscles.

      Some patients may need supplements to replenish a hormone or vitamin that the body is lacking. Examples include thyroid supplements, vitamins, or insulin injections.
      Medicines are often prescribed to control or reduce the immune system's response. Such medicines may include corticosteroids and immunosuppressant drugs such as cyclophosphamide or azathioprine.

      I hope this informqtion helps. I will post a longer more detailed answer at www.musclemagfitness.com later this week for you as well.

      Best Regards

  12. QUESTION:
    can low ferratin levels cause rapid heart beats?
    I have a ferratin level of 15 and recently it feels as though my heart just raced a marathon I can feel it pounding away, my resting pulse rate today was 120? I also just recently was tested for thyroid and I am subclinical for that. Will hopefully be treated for that soon!
    note: *hypothyroid which is odd because I should have a low heart rate so I thought maybe it was my low iron!

    • ANSWER:
      Low ferritin levels do not cause elevated heart rates unless the individual has profound anemia. You are correct that hypothyroidism is more likely to cause a slow pulse rate than a fast one but some individuals with hypothyroidism note an increase in pulse. It is possible that your pulse rate is not related to either of these problems. If your resting pulse rate is consistently above 90 I would notify your physician who may wish to see you sooner rather than later. I wish you the very best of health and in all things may God bless.

  13. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to get sick cause of exaustion?
    i have been doing a lot lately and this morning i felt sick and dizzy.nauseated.migrain

    • ANSWER:
      Exhaustion symptoms or excessive fatigue disorder

      Normally exhausted people show following apparent symptoms:
      Tired for no reason.
      Having trouble getting up in the morning.
      Depending on tea, coffee or colas to keep their going.
      Feeling run down and stressed.
      Dragging themselves through each day.
      Struggling to keep up with life's daily demands.
      Unable to bounce back from stress or illness.
      Not having fun any more.
      Experiencing decreased sex drive.
      Simply too tired to enjoy life.

      Exhaustion symptoms or excessive fatigue disorder has three defining characteristics:
      Feelings of excessive fatigue, weakness, and lack of energy,
      Increasing irritability, and
      Feelings of demoralization

      Comedian Dave Chappelle was hospitalized over the weekend for what his spokeswoman called "exhaustion." He's just the latest instance of a long celebrity tradition: Eminem canceled a tour due to "exhaustion" and other medical issues, Lindsay Lohan was carted off for "heat exhaustion," and Mariah Carey took a post-Glitter break after being hospitalized for "extreme exhaustion." Is exhaustion actually a medical diagnosis?

      World Health Organization, lists conditions of medical exhaustion due to heat, pregnancy, exposure, excessive exertion, and combat, as well as plain old "malaise and fatigue." .

      The fact that exhaustion has no single cause—you could be exhausted from too much work, improper nutrition, or intoxication—leads some doctors to avoid using it in diagnoses.

      Causes of Exhaustion:
      Stress
      Adrenal Insufficiency
      Hypothyroidism
      Anemia
      It's also a possible side effect of many prescription drugs, including beta blockers, muscle relaxants, and mood stabilizers

      Warning signs of heat exhaustion include:

      heavy sweating
      paleness
      muscle cramps
      tiredness
      weakness
      dizziness
      headache
      nausea or vomiting
      fainting

      So your symptoms of headaches ; dizziness and nausea can be all related to exhaustion.

      Heat exhaustion treatment:

      Cooling measures that may be effective include:
      cool, non-alcoholic beverages, as directed by your physician
      rest
      cool shower, bath, or sponge bath
      an air-conditioned environment
      Lightweight clothing

      Treatment for exhaustion varies depending on the cause. If it's the result of stress, a good night's sleep and some fluids are often enough to calm the nerves. (Exercise is good, too, once you're ready to stand.) More deep-seated exhaustion may require hormonal supplements or antidepressants

      How to avoid heat exhaustion
      1) Drink plenty of fluids and remember to alternate between water and something like gatorade or powerade that contains electrolytes. to avoid dehydration.
      2) Avoid caffeine and alcohol which can speed up dehydration
      3) Try to schedule physical activity in the early morning or late evening.
      4) If you must work outside during the heat of the day, make sure to take mini-breaks often and find a shady spot to cool down
      5) Make sure to dress in light weight/light colored clothes when going out

      And finally know the symptoms. Symptoms include headache, weakness, fatigue, vomiting, muscle cramps, etc

  14. QUESTION:
    What causes pins and needles?
    I haven't had them since I was a child, and then suddenly it happened again, so I am wondering why. Any ideas anyone?

    • ANSWER:
      Pins and needles' (paraesthesia) is a sensation of uncomfortable tingling or prickling, usually felt in the hands or feet. The affected area is sometimes said to have 'fallen asleep'. A common cause is leaning or lying awkwardly on a limb, which either presses against the nerves or reduces the blood supply to the local area. Changing position quickly restores normal feeling. Any numbness is soon replaced by the tingling and prickling sensation, as the nerves start sending messages again to the brain and spinal cord. In some cases, pins and needles are caused by nerve damage or certain disorders of the central nervous system. Always see your doctor if you experience frequent or persistent bouts of pins and needles.

      Symptoms
      The symptoms of pins and needles include:

      * Hands and feet are usually affected
      * Initial numbness and heaviness
      * Prickling and tingling sensation on the skin
      * Return of normal feeling a few minutes after changing position.

      A range of causes
      Pins and needles can be caused by a wide range of events and conditions, including:

      * Pressure on nerves
      * Reduced blood supply
      * Nerve injury
      * Hyperventilation or breathing excessively
      * The effect of toxic substances on the nerves, such as alcohol or lead
      * Certain medications
      * Diabetes
      * Multiple sclerosis
      * Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid gland)
      * Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA)
      * Stroke.

      Pressure-related pins and needles
      The peripheral nerves of the body send information back to the brain and spinal cord. When a sensory nerve is pressed by a cramped or awkward position, its functioning starts to falter. In time, the affected limb 'falls asleep', which means the sensory messages are blocked. Once pressure is taken off the nerve, functioning resumes. The uncomfortable prickling sensation is caused by the resumption of pain messages from nerves to the brain. Other nerves, such as those that provide information on temperature, take a little longer to recover.

      Pinched nerve
      Nerves can be pinched by bones and other tissue. Some examples include:

      * Carpal tunnel syndrome - the main nerve that services the hand runs through a ring of wrist bones. Inflamed and swollen tendon membranes reduce the amount of room inside the wrist and squash the nerve. Symptoms include pins and needles, pain and weakness.
      * Cervical nerve root irritation - nerves in the neck exit the spinal cord via small holes between the vertebrae. These small holes can be narrowed by inflammation, trauma or outgrowths of bone tissue (bone spurs). The nerves are compressed, causing pins and needles and, sometimes, referred pain into the arms.
      * Sciatica - the legs and feet are serviced by the sciatic nerve, which starts as four nerve roots between the vertebrae of the lower back. Each vertebra is cushioned by discs of cartilage. A prolapsed or 'slipped' disc bulges out and presses against one of the roots of the sciatic nerve, causing pins and needles and referred pain down the leg.

      Neuritis
      Neuritis is inflammation of the nerves. Some of the causes include:

      * Alcohol - chronic overconsumption of alcohol can be toxic to nerves and cause a condition called peripheral neuropathy, characterised by pins and needles.
      * Guillain-Barre syndrome - thought to be triggered by some kinds of viral infection.
      * Pernicious anaemia - causes a vitamin B12 deficiency that affects the functioning of the spinal cord.

      Nerve disease
      Nerve disease, or neuropathy, is characterised by the lack of sensory information to the brain due to damage of the sensory nerves. For example, a person with neuropathy may not experience pain to the normal degree, if at all. Conditions that may damage the sensory nerves include:

      * Severed spinal cord
      * Diabetes
      * Charcot-Marie-Tooth inherited neuropathy
      * Exposure to certain drugs and heavy metals, such as lead
      * Chronic overconsumption of alcohol.

      Seek medical advice
      The occasional bout of pins and needles is a harmless event. However, chronic pins and needles can be symptomatic of some other underlying disorder. Always see your doctor for a thorough medical investigation if you experience persistent or frequent episodes of numbness or pins and needles.

      Treatment options
      Treatment depends on the cause. For example, carpal tunnel syndrome may be treated with rest, splinting and medications such as anti-inflammatory and diuretic drugs. A nerve pinched by bone or some other tissue may need chiropractic or physiotherapy, or perhaps surgery to ease the pressure and allow full nerve functioning to resume. Underlying conditions such as diabetes need to be properly controlled to ease associated symptoms, including pins and needles. The symptoms of nerve inflammation and damage caused by chronic overconsumption of alcohol generally improve once the person stops drinking.

  15. QUESTION:
    what could be causing my joint pain and weakness?
    I am only 18 years old and experience weakness, fatigue, and joint pain. I eat relatively well, take vitamins, and get moderate exercise.The only medication im on is depo provera (injection form of birth control) my mother is aneamic and i have never been tested could it be this? i just dont know why i an so weak and tired with so much joint pain (especially in wrists and ankles)

    • ANSWER:
      Maybe Iron Deficiency since it's closely related to anemia ?
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/iron-deficiency-anemia/DS00323

      Signs and symptoms of iron deficiency may include brittle nails, swelling or soreness of the tongue, cracks in the sides of the mouth, an enlarged spleen, and frequent infections.

      Some signs and symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia are related to the condition's causes. For example, a sign of intestinal bleeding is bright red blood in the stools or black, tarry-looking stools.
      http://www.nutrientcor.com/nutrition-news/problems-with-unexplained-fatigue.php

      This highlights other potential problems like
      Underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism)
      Vitamin B Deficiency
      Caffeine Overload
      Food Intolerances
      Enzyme Deficiencies.
      “Leaky Gut” Syndrome.
      Sleep Apnea
      Undiagnosed Heart Disease

  16. QUESTION:
    I am have been sleeping allot and i don't know why. What could this be?
    My name is Katie, lately (a couple of months) i have been extremely tired. Today my mother had to wake me up because I had been sleeping for 21 hours. I've also been falling asleep during the day recently (on the motorway driving a car, while cycling, during exams and at less unfortunate moments). I did go to the doctor so they could test for anemia, the kissing disease etc. The doctor thought it was probably related to my food allergies seeing as i eat gluten free and lactose free. Anyway all the tests for illnesses came back negative and i have no deficiencies. What could be wrong with me? I just can't wake up, or stay awake. Please help.

    Katie
    I forgot to mention I'm nineteen years old

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid?
      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2, like maybe ONE) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (...OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

      You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. [anti-TPO and TgAb] They can code so that ins will pay.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless you

  17. QUESTION:
    Is anemia and sicko cell related?
    I am in my middle teens and i just found out i am anemic not to long ago so i was wondering is it related to sicko cell because i have a friend with the disease and have the same symptoms i.e pain in legs and staying cold. So i was wondering if it was related in some type of way.

    • ANSWER:
      Anemia is when you don't have enough hemoglobin in your red blood cells. Hemoglobin helps distribute oxygen throughout your entire body to you organs. Anemia can be caused by blood loss, low iron, and hypothyroidism among other things. I know because I am anemic. Sickle cell and anemia are not related but anemia can be a symptom of sickle cell because if is difficult for the sickle shaped blood cells to carry oxygen throughout you body. My doctor told me so.

  18. QUESTION:
    I have trouble walking, i start and i black out so to speak?
    i start walking not after sitting too long i will sit down for 15 mins or if i just stand, my head starts buzzing and every thing goes black and i start to fall and cant stop, im 14 and a guy, any reasons why this is happening? i have had typhoid if that helps but its been a few years, thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I was having this problem a few weeks ago - go to the doctor's and request a blood test as it could be any number of problems. As a few have suggested it could be a blood sugar level issue, potentially your thyroid could be acting up again (hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism? If it's to do with your thyroid and you have a history you definitely need to see the doctor in case it's a relapse), it may be related to anaemia (how much iron do you get in your diet? Red meat and iron-rich vegetables such as spinach and broccoli may help) - there are many possibilities.

      Book a blood test as soon as you can - it's better to get these things checked out by professionals who can examine you! Good luck =)

  19. QUESTION:
    Feel sick at the thought of food?
    Have an underactive thyroid, but have no appetite whatsoever. I feel so sick at the thought of food, and I can go 24 hours with nothing in my stomach?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm guessing you're asking if it's normal or maybe wondering if something else is wrong?

      You mention you suffer from hypothyroidism. I assume you take medication for this? Perhaps it could affect your appetite. Do you take any other medications? Do you suffer from any other medical conditions, psychological conditions etc?

      When did this begin? Is it new? Did you notice it began with the starting of treatment with a medication? Did it begin when you suffered a traumatic experience such as divorce of parents, abuse, bullying? Have you been this way as long as you can remember? Did you once have a healthy appetite? If there was a time you feel you had a healthier appetite, when was it and how often did you eat? Was it 3 meals a day?

      These are all important things to think about. The most common reason for something like this might be something psychological. If you are female you may be more prone to denying yourself food because of a body image issue or weight problem, or perceived weight problem that isn't really even there to other people. I'm not trying to attack you or accuse you of having something wrong psychologically, I'm just exploring a possible cause. These things also happen to men so don't take any of this as some sort of insult!

      Since you may be female ( I don't know but I'm guessing ) I assume you have started menstruation, and you could suffer from Anemia, due to the blood loss of heavy periods. This could really affect your appetite and might be a cause for what you are describing.

      It could be related to medications (if you take any).

      It could also, be an undiagnosed issue of some sort related to your blood, or perhaps an illness of some sort, but it's not really wise to jump to conclusions about things like this since we don't know and there are other more likely things to rule out.

      You really just need to go to the doctor. Preferably a doctor you know, and trust, who you feel will take you seriously and use their knowledge to get to the bottom of what is causing your lack of appetite.

      I'm sorry I couldn't help you more. It's impossible, and irresponsible of anyone to tell you they know for a fact, what is causing your lack of appetite.

      Before you go to the doctor think about some of the questions I asked you, and think about what you are going to tell the doctor, and the information you think might help them figure out what is wrong. Tell them when it started. Tell them when you last felt you had a healthy appetite, and how often you ate. If you feel it might be emotional, tell them it's nothing too be embarrassed about. IF it's not emotional, and they are implying it might be, you should strongly disagree without getting emotional about it. (if you get emotional with doctors, they generally will think you are nuts)

      Also...If you feel doctors aren't taking you seriously, or they are writing you off, as being depressed etc, and you don't agree, keep going to different doctors and pursuing the matter until someone figures it out and gives you an answer that you can believe.

      Take Care!

  20. QUESTION:
    Why do I keep feeling itchy?
    I feel uncomfortably itchy all over, and I don't know why... It's not a rash, because there is no redness or swelling, I just feel itchy for no reason all the time.

    • ANSWER:
      Itching is an irritating sensation in the skin. Most people have itching from time to time. Often, there is no clear reason for the itching.
      Itching has many possible causes. These may include:
      + allergic conditions, such as skin conditions known as atopic dermatitis or contact dermatitis. Allergic rhinitis is an allergic condition that can cause itchy eyes and nose. Drug reactions, common with penicillin or sulfa antibiotics, are another common cause of allergic itching.
      + skin conditions, such as psoriasis, bullous pemphigoid, or abnormally dry skin, sometimes called xerosis
      + irritation of the skin. This may be from sunburn, insect bites, chemicals, soaps, poison ivy or other causes.
      + skin infections, such as scabies
      + bodywide infections such as chickenpox
      + cancer or tumors, such as certain blood cancers known as lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and polycythemia vera. Other tumors, such as a skin cancer called melanoma, stomach cancer or a carcinoid tumor can also cause itching.
      + conditions with bodywide effects, such as chronic renal failure, certain liver conditions, such as cholestasis of pregnancy, or iron-deficiency anemia
      + autoimmune disorders, conditions in which a person's immune system attacks his or her own body. Examples include Sjögren syndrome and multiple sclerosis.
      + hormone imbalances such as those that occur in diabetes. Low thyroid hormone levels called hypothyroidism and high thyroid hormone levels, known as hyperthyroidism, both can cause itching as well.
      + psychological causes. These may include anxiety, psychosis or cocaine withdrawal
      Other causes are also possible. Sometimes, no cause can be found.
      Prevention is related to the cause. For example, avoiding sunburn or poison ivy can prevent these causes of itching.-

  21. QUESTION:
    My best friend has thyroid problems (hypothyroidism). What will happen to her?
    My friend is very concerned, almost hysterical about her condition. What will happen to her? I want to help her, but I need more information (she doesn't know where to look). She has been told that she seems to have all the symptoms (nervosity, abundant sweat, can't lose weight, can't breathe well), and she is 17 yeras old. How will her condition affect her and her everyday life and what can she do about it? Will she have any dietary restrictions? please give me some information about her condition. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      these are actually syptoms of hyperthyroidism. check your other question regarding it. but here is information on hypothyroidism as well.

      Hypothyroidism is the disease state caused by insufficient production of thyroid hormone by the thyroid gland. There are several distinct causes for chronic hypothyroidism, the most common being Hashimoto's thyroiditis and hypothyroidism following radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism.

      The severity of hypothyroidism varies widely. Patients are classified as "subclinical hypothyroid" if diagnostic findings show thyroid hormone abnormalities, but they do not exhibit any symptoms. Others have moderate symptoms that can be mistaken for other diseases and states. Advanced hypothyroidism may cause severe complications, the most serious one of which is myxedema.

      Signs and symptoms

      Adults
      Slowed speech and a hoarse, breaking voice. Deepening of the voice can also be noticed.
      Impaired memory
      Impaired cognitive function (brain fog)
      Urticaria (hives)
      Migraine headache
      Increased sensitivity to heat and cold
      A slow heart rate with ECG changes including low voltage signals. Diminished cardiac output and decreased contractility.
      Pericardial effusions may occur.
      Sluggish reflexes
      Dry puffy skin, especially on the face, and hair loss, especially thinning of the outer 1/3 of the eyebrows
      Depression (especially in the elderly)
      Weight gain and obesity
      Anemia caused by impaired hemoglobin synthesis (decreased EPO levels), impaired intestinal iron and folate absorption or B12 deficiency from pernicious anemia
      Slowed metabolism
      Constipation
      Fatigue (physical)
      Choking sensation or difficulty swallowing
      Shortness of breath with a shallow and slow respiratory pattern.
      Impaired ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and hypoxia.
      Increased need for sleep
      Muscle cramps and joint pain
      Decreased sex drive
      Brittle fingernails
      Osteoporosis
      Paleness
      Irritability
      Yellowing of the skin due to impaired conversion of beta-carotene to vitamin A
      Abnormal menstrual cycles
      Impaired renal function with decreased GFR.
      Thin, fragile or absent cuticles
      Infertility or difficulty becoming pregnant
      Elevated serum cholesterol
      Acute psychosis (myxedema madness) is a rare presentation of hypothyroidism
      weak muscles

      Children

      Very Early Infancy
      Feeding problems
      Constipation
      Hoarseness
      Excessive sleepiness
      Protruding tongue
      Puffy appearance of hands and feet
      Deaf mutism

      Later Infancy/Toddlerhood
      Protruding abdomen
      Rough, dry skin
      Delayed teething

      After Toddlerhood
      Lack of normal growth
      Abnormally short for age on height/weight charts
      Puffy, bloated appearance
      Below-normal intelligence for age

      Causes

      Neonatal hypothyroidism
      Thyroid hormone is very important to neural development in the neonatal period. A deficiency of thyroid hormones can lead to cretinism. For this reason it is important to detect and treat thyroid deficiency early. In Australia, the Netherlands, and many other countries this is done by testing for TSH on the routine neonatal heel pricks performed by law on all newborn babies.

      Hashimoto's thyroiditis
      Sometimes called Hashimoto's Disease, this is part of the spectrum of autoimmune diseases and is related to Graves' disease, lymphocytic thyroiditis, and other organ-related autoimmune conditions such as Addison's disease, diabetes, premature menopause and vitiligo. Hashimoto's is a lymphocytic and plasmacytic thyroid inflammation that eventually destroys the thyroid. Patients require permanent thyroid hormone replacement.

      Autoimmune hypothyroidism may also be part of a spectrum of disorders referred to as Schmidt's syndrome:

      Hypothyroidism
      Pernicious anemia
      Diabetes mellitus
      Adrenal insufficiency
      Thyroid surgery for this has generally been a sub-total thyroidectomy. A large reason for this is the risk of destroying the parathyroids in a total thyroidectomy. If insufficient thyroid tissue remains to produce normal requirements then supplementary thyroxine is required.

      Pituitary failure
      Reduction or loss of TSH secretion by the pituitary is a rare cause of hypothyroidism. This constellation is usually referred to as "secondary hypothyroidism". Even rarer is tertiary hypothyroidism that is caused either by hypothalamic lesions or by interruption of signal transfer in the portal veins connecting the hypothalamus to the pituitary gland (Pickardt syndrome).

      Iatrogenic
      Hypothyroidism may occur as an adverse reaction to lithium used in the treatment of mood disorders, and in response to interferon and IL-2 treatment (e.g. for cancer). It may also be a result of the antiarrhythmic amiodarone.

      Iodine deficiency
      Severe iodine deficiency is another major cause of hypothyroidism. In areas of the world where there is an iodine deficiency in the diet, severe hypothyroidism can be seen in 5 to 15% of the population. In many countries, iodine deficiency is very rare due to the small amount of iodine salt that is added to common table salt.

      Surgery on the thyroid is generally done in a form that allows some hormone-producing tissue to remain. Nevertheless, some patients will need hormone supplementation after surgery.

      Treatment
      Myxedema coma
      Myxedema coma is a medical emergency. The major imbalances are hypoglycemia, hyponatremia, hypothermia and acute renal failure. The initial management includes warming the patient, monitoring the vitals. Parenteral steroids is the initial drug (injection hydrocortisone 100 mg - 200 mg) given. Levothyroxine 600 micrograms is given through nasogastric tube or parenteral route.

      Hypothyroidism
      Clinically apparent hypothyroidism usually warrants treatment, and there is evidence that treating subclinical hypothyroidism is indicated to slow long-term consequences, such as atherosclerosis. In case the hypothyroidism is due to dietary minerals and iodine, supplementation with these may obviate the need for hormonal treatment, but only if iodine deficiency has been documented, which is very rare in the Western world.

      Treatment is usually with levothyroxine (starting at 50 μg/day), a synthetic thyroxine analogue. There is no evidence suggesting that there is any need to substitute T3 as well[1][2].

      Symptoms as well as TSH levels are used to monitor effect of substitution; a high TSH level suggests treatment is not yet adequate and that dose adjustments are necessary. A low ("suppressed") TSH may indicate the dose is too high. Some patients prefer a pig thyroid extract, natural desiccated thyroid hormones, which contains T3 as well as T4 and traces of T2, T1 and calcitonin.

  22. QUESTION:
    have hypothyroidism, told levels ok for now.i now get air hunger and really tired. any thoughts, remedies?
    I struggle to breathe and fall asleep if i sit down longer than 5 mins. I had anaemia and told it is also away. Anyone know if these are related to thyroidism? My docs don't seem to be very helpful.

    • ANSWER:
      No they are not helpful and try and convince you that you have depression and give you more dangerous drugs.

      Read on and I will tell you of a natural product that will make you feel well again with lots of energy.

      First off all if you are in the UK, 99% of doctors do not know how to treat thyroid disease. They only know about Thyroxin which is a synthetic CHEMICAL and should not be in your body. It has many side affects, many don’t feel well on thyroxin as you may well find in a couple of months...weight gain, extreme fatigue, frequent bowel movements, puffy eyes and dry skin, and many others.

      People with under active thyroid glands who take Synthyroid (thyroxine) should be warned that this drug stimulates osteoclast activity, accelerating bone resorption, and leading to osteoporosis. Natural thyroid medication is available in most countries and is far superior.
      Thyroid disease has become epidemic, due to our stressful lives and ill-conceived diets. Soy, in particular, which is used so widely now, suppresses thyroid function and should be banned in all its forms.

      In the long term it leads to osteoporosis. In time you will experience these side affects, so please keep the information that I am about to tell you as you WILL need it. You can treat your thyroid by natural medication with NO side affects. The medication is called Armour Thyroid and is derived from pig’s glands that have a great success rate. They actually used to prescribe it in this country for people with thyroid disease. Yet most doctors don’t even know that, in fact most doctors will not have heard of it and advice you against it while not being able to give you scientific evidence why you shouldn’t! That’s because it’s all about money not health. Their problem with natural products is that nobody can patent them, so the government cannot have exclusive ownership. But they can by making up synthetic chemicals.

      What you need to know is that about 85% of people are unable to transfer T4 into T3 when they use Thyroxin. T3 is essential to the function of the main organs of your body. Armour thyroid naturally has T4, T3 and T2 and T1 and it make you feel well with no side affects. Tyrosine does not have T2 & T1. Once you research it at the site below you can order it from the recommended site -http://www.internationalpharmacy.com/en/home

      I was on Thyroxin for two years and did not feel well on it I had absolutely no energy and my weight ballooned up to 19 and a half stone. I started my Armour in April this year and I am now 15 and a half stone with loads of energy. Armour Thyroid helps increase your metabolism where thyroxin slows it down. As you don’t know me, don’t take my word for your health go to http://www.tpa-uk.org.uk/ Sheila Turner (expert on thyroid disease) runs this thyroid patient advocacy site which will inform and educate you on your disease. There are over six hundred other people on that forum who are taking Armour Thyroid and can give you advice. Pretty soon you will see that doctors know absolutely nothing about treating the thyroid. The are ignorant about it.

      Beware of people on this site who are not what they seem, and will try and discredit amour thyroid at every opportunity.
      In the early 1960s, desiccated thyroid hormones (thyroid extract) began to be replaced by synthetic levothyroxine (T4), or by combinations of synthetic T4 and T3. Replacement occurred faster in the United Kingdom than in North America, but by the 1980s more patients were being prescribed synthetic levothyroxine or T4/T3 combinations than desiccated thyroid extract.

  23. QUESTION:
    Im a diabetic, and im tired all the time. any reasons why?
    its geting on my nerves, and its hard to wake up in the morning.
    my blood sugars are fine, but im in a yale study and need to take the pills for the study, which is metformin.

    • ANSWER:
      not necessarily related to diabetes. there are a million things that cause fatigue- off the top of my head- sleep disorders, anemia, stress, hypothyroidism.
      maybe your doc needs to do a workup for fatigue.

      take care!

  24. QUESTION:
    Hormone imbalance?? something else?? How to manage/treat?
    Hi,
    So I'm pretty sure my current on-going symptoms are partially hormone-related.
    They are feeling lethargic, nauseous, exhausted, fatigued, foggy-minded during the day,
    and a half hour or so after dinner I get ravenously hungry, crave all sorts of substances and foods, and am more awake and alert. It is really messing me up and I feel like crap.
    Does this ring a bell with anyone? Any idea what could be causing these specific symptoms?
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Iron anaemia symptoms include fatigue, nausea, brain fog, and a craving for strange foods/substances which is called pica. I would suggest asking the doctor for a ferritin test (most accurate test for iron deficiency) to rule this out. Anaemia can be caused by various reasons from lacking in the diet to hypothyroidism to malabsorption problems like celiac's disease.

      http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Anaemia

  25. QUESTION:
    Why do I sometimes hear a ringing in my left ear?

    • ANSWER:
      It's probably tinnitus

      Definition
      Tinnitus is hearing ringing, buzzing, or other sounds without an external cause. Patients may experience tinnitus in one or both ears or in the head.
      Description
      Tinnitus affects as many as 40 million adults in the United States. It is defined as either objective or subjective. In objective tinnitus, the doctor can hear the sounds, as well as the patient. Objective tinnitus is typically caused by tumors, turbulent blood flow through malformed vessels, or by rhythmic muscular spasms. Most cases of tinnitus are subjective, which means that only the patient can hear the sounds.
      Causes and symptoms
      Subjective tinnitus is frequently associated with hearing loss. About 90% of patients have sensorineural hearing loss; 5% suffer from conductive hearing loss; 5% have normal hearing. The causes of subjective tinnitus include:

      * impacted ear wax
      * ear infections
      * hardening of the structures of the inner ear
      * hearing loss related to age or excessive noise
      * ototoxic medications, including aspirin, quinine, some diuretics, heavy metals, alcohol, and certain antibiotics
      * meniere's syndrome
      * head trauma
      * systemic diseases, including syphilis, hypertension, anemia, or hypothyroidism
      * tumors of the ear

      Diagnosis
      Diagnosis of tinnitus includes a physical examination of the patient's head and neck. The doctor will use an otoscope to examine the ears for wax, infection, or structural changes. He or she will also use a stethoscope to listen to the blood vessels in the neck. Additional tests may include the following:
      Tuning fork tests
      The Rinne and Weber tests are commonly used to evaluate the type and severity of hearing loss. In the Weber test, the doctor holds a tuning fork against the patient's forehead or front teeth. If the hearing loss is sensorineural, the sound radiates to the ear with better hearing; if the hearing loss is conductive, the sound will be louder in the damaged ear. In the Rinne test, the tuning fork is placed alternately on the mastoid bone (behind the ear) and in front of the ear. In conductive hearing loss, bone conduction (BC) is greater than air conduction (AC). In sensorineural hearing loss, AC is greater than BC.
      Diagnostic imaging
      Magnetic resonance angiography or venography (MRA and MRV) can be used to evaluate malformations of the blood vessels. Computed tomography scans (CT scans) or magnetic resonance imaging scans (MRIs) can be used to locate tumors or abnormalities of the brain stem.
      Blood tests
      The doctor may order a complete blood count (CBC) with specific antibody tests to rule out syphilis or immune system disorders.
      Treatment
      Some cases of tinnitus can be treated by removal of the underlying cause. These include surgical treatment of impacted ear wax, tumors, head injuries, or malformed blood vessels; discontinuance of ototoxic medications; and antibiotic treatment of infections.
      Subjective tinnitus, especially that associated with age-related hearing loss, can be treated with hearing aids, noise generators or other masking devices, biofeedback, antidepressant medications, or lifestyle modifications (elimination of smoking, coffee, and aspirin).
      Alternative treatment
      A variety of alternative therapies may be helpful in the treatment of tinnitus. Dietary adjustments, including the elimination of coffee and other stimulants, may be useful, since stimulants can make tinnitus worse. In addition, reducing the amount of fat and cholesterol in the diet can help improve blood circulation to the ears. Nutritional supplementation with vitamin C, vitamin E, B vitamins, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and essential fatty acids is also recommended. Gingko (Gingko biloba) is often suggested, since it is believed to enhance circulation to the brain. Acupuncture treatments may help decrease the level of tinnitus sounds the patient hears, and constitutional homeopathic treatment may also be effective.
      Prognosis
      The prognosis depends on the cause of the tinnitus and the patient's emotional response. Most patients with subjective tinnitus do not find it seriously disturbing, but about 5% have strong negative feelings. These patients are frequently helped by instruction in relaxation techniques.

  26. QUESTION:
    What do I have? Anemic, Fatigue, Cold Hands, etc....?
    This has been going on most of my life. I was a sick child with asthma and a ton of allergies. those finally went away but now I experience things like getting dizzy when I stand up, sometimes extreme weakness (where I just have to lay down and my limbs feel heavy, I almost can't move), just being slow in general, sorta cold extremeties, low motivation for anything.

    So the docs thought it was hypothyroidism at first... didn't help. I've tried supplements like B vitamins, Wheatgrass, goji juice, eating a mostly veggie diet etc etc. I may have seen a bit of improvement, but I'm no where near normal. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      i think you may have answered your own question, you may be anemic. if not you should ask your doctor about low blood pressure. it kind of sounds like your blood may not be flowing right to your whole body.

      i also suggest asking about sickle-cell anemia/ disease:

      Symptoms
      Painful events (crises) in the hands or feet, abdomen, back, or chest are the most common symptom of sickle cell disease . This pain may last from hours to days. Most people with sickle cell disease experience anemia . Symptoms of anemia include feeling weak and tired. People with sickle cell disease can appear pale or washed out, or have a yellowish look to their skin and the whites of their eyes ( jaundice ).

      When a child is born with sickle cell disease, it isn't possible to predict which symptoms will appear, when they will start, or how severe they will be. Most symptoms of sickle cell disease are related to either long-term (chronic) anemia or blood vessels blocked by sickled cells.

      Symptoms related to chronic anemia

      Most people who have sickle cell disease have at least mild symptoms of chronic anemia, which may include:

      Weakness.
      Tiredness (fatigue).
      Pale appearance.
      Yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eyes (jaundice).
      Shortness of breath, especially when they are active.
      Research suggests that infants younger than 2 who have severe anemia, hand-foot syndrome , or both may be more likely to have severe sickle cell disease throughout life. 1 Severe anemia may also raise the chance of a person with sickle cell disease getting high blood pressure in the lungs ( pulmonary hypertension ), and this can be deadly. 2

      Symptoms caused by blocked blood vessels

      Pain symptoms caused by blocked blood vessels in bones, organs, and other tissues include hours to days of extreme pain ( painful events ). These painful events account for more than 90% of hospital admissions of adults with sickle cell disease. 3 Some people rarely have a painful event, while others have them often; three or more per year is considered severe.

      Children between the ages of 6 months and 4 years may have episodes of extreme pain in the hands, the feet, or both (hand-foot syndrome).

  27. QUESTION:
    Keep feeling tired and getting ill?
    Earlier this week I had a bad sick bug that gave me constant nausea, it was really bad and I was bedridden for a few days. Now I have a cold (tummy ache, runny nose, sneezing, coughing, maybe a throat infection). At the moment I am quite tired a lot of the time, especially later in the day, even when I haven't been doing much. I was just wandering if the tiredness is related to being ill and why I keep getting ill? Is it just a coincidence or is there a reason why I am getting ill frequently?

    • ANSWER:
      Fatigue weakens your immune system.

      Perhaps glandular fever or CFS are possibilities.

      One of the most common fatigue causes is anxiety, which is known to effect 40 million U.S. adults each year. Anxiety is a state of fear of real or imagined danger, which is manifested as increased heart rate, trembling, panic, weakness, extreme fatigue and stomach or intestinal discomfort. Disorders of this nature make up the largest mental illness diagnosis in the U.S.

      In women of reproductive age, anemia is fairly common. It can be the result of heavy menstrual periods or having a baby. Anemia is one of the more common fatigue causes in women. When you don’t have enough iron in your body, your hemoglobin isn’t strong enough to carry the necessary amounts of oxygen to your body. Consume more iron-rich foods. As iron supplements can be potentially dangerous, they should be consumed with caution, or preferably in consultation with a suitable natural health practitioner.

      Your thyroid may be the cause of your fatigue. If you have hypothyroidism, this means that you have a slow metabolism, and this could be preventing you from getting the energy your body needs from the foods you eat. This can leave you feeling sluggish and even a little depressed.

      There are also many lifestyle problems that can increase your chances of feeling fatigued, including inactivity, heavy alcohol consumption, excessive physical activity, lack of sleep, antihistamines, stress and unhealthy eating habits. For most of these, identifying and solving the problem is usually the best course of action.

      Depression can also be a fatigue cause, as a poor mental and emotional state can translate to physical lethargy.

      You may have a urinary tract infection and not even know it. Often, the only symptom can be fatigue.

      Too much caffeine can actually be making you feel constantly tired. If you think that this might be the cause of your fatigue, try to do without it for a while and see how you feel.

      Food allergies can also be behind your fatigue. Since even a slight intolerance can be at the root of what’s making you tired, you should start eliminating foods from your diet to see how you feel. Slowly reintroduce the food after a time and see if it affects you.

      Another common fatigue cause, especially in today's toxic world, is the accumulation of too much toxins in one's body. An improved diet, regular exercise, as well as suitable detoxification protocols would help a great deal.

      As you can see, there are many different possible causes of your fatigue. If your fatigue has gone on for a long time, you should consider getting a check up, as you may have a more serious problem, such as chronic fatigue syndrome or other problems such as kidney failure or sleep apnea.

      Only by addressing your underlying fatigue causes, can true and total healing of your condition be effected.

      You can see further information in a web search for "common fatigue causes".

  28. QUESTION:
    Is it Anemia or Hypothyroidism?
    I am 18 years old and entering my freshman year in college. I am 5'11'' and 135lds so I’m pretty tall and thin. Two years ago I became a vegetarian and my doctor was a bit concerned about anemia because of the lack of iron in my diet, (and my mom is also anemic) but it was never looked into. Once summer break began I started feeling very tired and sluggish even though I was sleeping on average 9 hours a night. I thought I was getting too much sleep or not being active enough but even when I exercised regularly I felt tired. I thought about the possibilities of anemia and the only other symptoms I have are pale skin and headaches (I seem to get headaches a lot, I always have, but I had my first migraine about three weeks ago, I don’t know if that has anything to do with anemia). Today I went to the doctors to get a blood test done to check for iron, and my doctor also ordered a hypothyroidism test. When I got home I read up on hypothyroidism and realized that I have experienced some of the symptoms (hypothyroidism also runs in my family). Besides being mildly tired and sluggish I also am very sensitive to hot and cold temperatures. I have somewhat pale and dry skin especially in the winter, but I don’t have a puffy face or brittle hair or nails. I also started exercising more and started weighing myself more and noticed my weight fluctuating within 5lbs or so each couple of days to a week, but I haven’t really noticed an exact weight gain. I also do not have a hoarse voice, which is a symptom, but instead I always have a constant tickle in the back of my throat that I always find myself trying to clear. I guess I should mention that I have really long and heavy periods and phases of constipation. I also have always had a lot of knee pain and swelling, especially when exercising for a period of time, but I have very long legs and weird joints so it might have something to do with that. Lastly, I have never been depressed but I do get confused easily and tend to forget things. I don’t know if my brain is just shutting off for the summer, or it’s something else, because I definitely have a hard time concentrating and retaining information. I also have recently noticed within the past year, that it has sometimes been hard for me to make sentences and verbalize correctly without drawing a blank midway through the sentence (that sounds pretty extreme, and what I’m experiencing is very mild, I just thought I should mention it because I saw confusion was a symptom)
    Anyway, I just don’t feel like myself right now, and I can usually tell when there’s something wrong in my body. I should be getting the results back from the blood test in a couple of weeks, but before then I just wanted to see if anyone had information about anemia and/or hypothyroidism that might relate to my situation. Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      Vitamin B12 deficiency is common with vegetarians plus many of your symptoms are listed under a B12 deficiency: fatigue, sensitivity to cold, pale skin, heavy periods, headaches, intermittent constipation/diarrhea, confusion, problems with cognitive function, forgetfullness/memory loss, poor attention span. Optimal B12 serum is over 800pg/ml or 600pmol/l. A more accurate test is the urinary methylmalonic acid test (UMMA). Methylmalonic acid levels rises just 10 days after a B12 deficiency occurs. Sublingual (under the tongue) B12 is very effective to increase B12 levels.

      90% of adults with hypothyroidism have Hashimoto's Thyroiditis - autoimmune hypothyroidism. This is confirmed with higher than normal thyroid antibodies. Your TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) can be "normal" with this condition.

      Nutritional Deficiencies in Vegetarian Diets >>>
      http://www.vitamin-deficiency-today.com/vitamins-for-vegetarians.html

      B12 deficiency: a silent epidemic with serious consequences >>>
      http://thehealthyskeptic.org/b12-deficiency-a-silent-epidemic-with-serious-consequences?utm_source=The+Healthy+Skeptic&utm_campaign=8b111bfd2f-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email

      Hashimotos – The autoimmune attack on your thyroid! >>>
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/hashimotos/

  29. QUESTION:
    What Is Good For Hair Regrowth?
    I just want some options on whats good to have my hair grow back? Nothing expensive! Something that really does work! Please Help Me Out!!!
    Thank You in advance...

    • ANSWER:
      When it comes to hairy situations, many of us can live with a bad haircut or a little graying or the occasional day with our hair looks like a haystack. But the most frustrating problem for many people--men especially--is what's perceived to be the start of the downhill slide to death, or at least the impetus for wanting that Corvette: hair loss.

      While we tend to say that baldness comes from the mother's side, an individual's genes from both parents influence that person's predisposition to male or female-pattern baldness. Of course, hair loss is far more visible in men (80 percent of whom experience some degree of baldness), but nearly 40 percent of women lose substantial amounts of hair after menopause, as well (women tend to thin out all over, rather than develop the signature spots that men do), making it a major appearance issue for both genders.To learn how you lose hair, you first have to understand how it grows. Hair goes through its own growth cycle that's unrelated to seasons or hormones or anything else. It's a random biological process that's dictated largely by your genetic disposition. The two main phases:

      Anagen (active): Cells in the root are dividing quickly and pushing the hair out. It averages two to three years.

      Telogen (resting): This phase last for about 100 days on the scalp. Consider it hair hibernation- the follicle is completely at rest.

      Doctors don't know why certain hair follicles are programmed to have a shorter growth period than others. One suspected factor for age-related male-pattern baldness is a person's level of androgens- the "male" hormones that are actually produced by both men and women. For many years, people believed that a predominance of testosterone was the root cause of baldness, but it's not quite that simple. We don't know that we lose hair especially fast if it is exposed to dihydrotestosterone (DHT, which comes from metabolism of testosterone). It's believed that the exposure of follicles to levels of testosterone that are normal for adult males causes the hair follicles to go into a resting state. This DHT is formed in the testes, prostate, adrenals, and hair follicles themselves through an enzyme called 5-alpha reductase. The enzyme raises the levels of DHT, and that's why there's a link between higher levels of this enzymes and areas of baldness. DHT changes healthy follicles to follicles that grow thin dwarf hairs- hairs that resemble peach fuzz. Essentially, DHT shrinks hair follicles, making it impossible for healthy hair to survive. Drug companies have targeted this process by making antibaldness medication that inhibits 5-alpha-reductase, the enzyme that makes DHT. (Some infrequent side effects of these meds include impotence, decreased libido, and breast enlargement).

      Now, age-related baldness isn't the only reason why clumps of hair start falling from the head like raindrops from the sky. Other causes, especially for women, include low iron levels and anemia (low blood count), recent anesthesia for surgery (it's the stress of the surgery and the pressure on one area of the head, not the anesthesia), menopause or being postpartum, autoimmune diseases such as lupus, thyroid disease, and polycystic ovarian disease (PCOS).

      Rapid hair loss is often a strong sign that you ought to have a battery of tests to evaluate your nutrition, health, and hormone levels. And that makes an important point: Hair loss isn't just an appearance issue; it can be a sign that something wacky is going on elsewhere in your body. Inflammation in the scalp, from an overdose of sun or from seborrheic dermatitis, can speed up hair loss. More often than not, it's a hormone issue- especially one involving your thyroid gland. In women especially, it's common to experience a decline in thyroid hormone (that's called hypothyroidism), where some of your bodily systems slow down. Scalp hair loss or facial hair growth is a sign that you should have your hormone levels checked. We recommend having your thyroid-stimulating hormone checked every other year if you're losing hair, or, for all others, once at age 20, then at age 35, and every other year after age 50 (TSH is the trigger from the brain that tells your thyroid gland to make thyroid hormone). If your level of thyroid hormone is low or if it's normal but you are experiencing thyroid-related symptoms, you can be (and usually need to be) treated with a synthetic (sometimes bioidentical) hormome. You'll need to be rechecked six weeks later to see if the supplemented does is enough. For a man, a decline in the need to shave signals a decrease in testosterone (for a woman, it's the same clue if she needs to shave her legs less often).

  30. QUESTION:
    why am i so cold?,is it my diet?
    over the past few months i have been trying to loose weight, and certainly succeeding. i lost 2 stone. i feel a lot more confident as being 13 means that a lot depends on how you look.

    but lately ive been really cold a lot of the time and ive had no energy at all. whenever i change i always change by the radiator which is turned up ot the max. i then have burning hot showers. ive tried adding more sugar to my diet but not really succeeding. should i just give it more time or is it something else?

    • ANSWER:
      * LOW THYROID FUNCTION. Try drenamin and go check out this web site www.gohealthgirl.com. She had that problem, her diet helps you to regain circulation.

      * You could be anemic.

      * One possibility is hypothyroidism , in which levels of thyroid hormone are below normal.

      * There are many causes of feeling cold all the time. This could be from anemia or a thyroid disorder or circulatory problems related to diabetes, high cholesterol or many various other disorders. You should see your family doctor for a routine check up and labwork to know for sure!

      * I know another answer, although insignificant, apparently, not getting enough affection, can make you cold.

      * Some people don't have enough muscle mass or the insulating fat layer which helps keep most people warm. The muscles help warm the body, while the fat layer helps keep the heat where it belongs. There is also a possibility or hormone imbalance.

      * Raynaud's Disease. Do a search for that, you will find good information about this condition. It is bad circulation in your feet, fingers and nose. Your body temperature is always lower than most people. You will be surrounded by people who love "air conditioning", yet the heater is your best friend. Good luck. No treatment is found for this, my research has shown it to be annoying more than a health issue.

      * One reason people feel Cold, in hands and feet, can be due to dips in blood pressure. This is acctually fairly common as it is caused by not drinking enough water. Drink more water and see if it helps. The drops in blood pressure also can cause 'black outs', fainting or dizzy spells...

  31. QUESTION:
    I want stop sleeping, can you help me?
    I sleep to much, I can't stop, sometimes over 16 hours a day, some people call it laseness even myself, but started to suspect it could be an illness, I try wake up early around 7:30, have a shower, lots of coffee, but around twelve I fell sleep wherever I am, I never had that problem before, maybe now could be because I spent the last 3 years working over night, I heard something called hormones upside down, I don't know, do you know about something that could help put more oxigen in my brain so I don't need to much of sleep? thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      What you need to do is see your doctor. There are many conditions associated with oversleeping.

      Sudden or persistent fatigue, despite adequate rest, may mean it's time for you to consult your doctor. Unrelenting exhaustion may be a sign of an underlying medical problem. In general, talk to your doctor if you're extremely tired or unable to regain your energy after several weeks of increased rest. Medical causes of fatigue can include:

      Anemia
      This blood disorder results from a number of problems that affect your blood's ability to transport oxygen, causing fatigue.

      Cancer
      Fatigue can be a symptom of cancer. A thorough checkup, including routine cancer screenings, can help rule out malignancy as a cause of your fatigue.

      Depression
      A loss of energy that's accompanied by any number of symptoms, including sadness, loss of appetite, difficulty sleeping or oversleeping, a lack of interest in pleasurable activities, and difficulty concentrating may be a part of depression.

      Diabetes
      Extreme fatigue can be a warning sign of diabetes. Signs and symptoms of diabetes, in addition to fatigue, include excessive thirst, frequent urination, blurred vision and recurring infections.

      Medications
      Prescription or over-the-counter medications may cause fatigue or make you too restless to sleep well. Antihistamines, cough and cold remedies, some antidepressants, and many other drugs may make you tired. Talk to your doctor if you suspect your medications are making you tired.

      Restless legs syndrome (RLS)
      This condition is characterized by an inability to keep your legs still and by tingling or aching sensations in your legs, feet or arms. The symptoms generally occur at night, preventing sound sleep.

      Sleep apnea
      Signs of this disorder include loud snoring, pauses between breaths and awakening frequently while gasping for air. It's a common source of fatigue because it interferes with sound sleep. Losing weight and quitting smoking may help, as well as an adjustment in sleeping position. Lying on your side or facedown may reduce snoring.

      Thyroid problems
      Hypothyroidism is a condition in which your thyroid gland fails to make or release enough thyroid hormone. Signs and symptoms include sluggishness, chronically cold hands and feet, constipation, dry skin and a hoarse voice. Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which your thyroid produces excessive amounts of hormone. Too much hormone also can cause fatigue, muscle weakness, weight loss, increased heart rate, nervousness and irritability.

      A diagnosis of exclusion: Chronic fatigue syndrome
      Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complicated disorder characterized by extreme fatigue that doesn't improve with bed rest and may worsen with physical or mental activity. Of all chronic illnesses, chronic fatigue syndrome is one of the most mysterious.

      Severe and debilitating fatigue, muscle aches and difficulty concentrating are the most commonly reported symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome. In some cases, low-grade fevers and swollen lymph nodes also may develop.

      A diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome is based on exclusion. This means that before arriving at a diagnosis, a doctor has ruled out any other disease or condition that may be causing your fatigue and related symptoms.

  32. QUESTION:
    What is a differential diagnosis?
    Give examples.

    • ANSWER:
      Here is an example:

      A 26 year old white male presents to his general practitioner with the primary complaint of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), trouble concentrating, and difficulty sleeping. He has a medical history positive for acne vulgaris and for 10 years he has used tetracycline (an antibiotic) 500 mg three times daily and Cleocin T (clindamycin topical) 1%.

      A differential diagnosis is basically a list of possible diagnoses.

      For example in this case several potential problems come to mind:

      Psychiatric/neurological: Insomnia, primary insomnia, insomnia due to a psychiatric or physiological problem, narcolepsy, major depressive disorder, sleep apnoea, restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS), excessive use of caffeine or nicotine, substance abuse or dependency, substance withdrawal, drug interactions, anxiety, ADHD, bipolar, idiopathic hypersomnia, primary hypersomnia, hypersomnia due to a medical condition and chronic pain.

      Physiological: hypothyroidism, anemia, hypoglycemia, and pain (yes that can be psychiatric and physical).

      From that list a doctor might have in his brain he will ask questions, look at the medical history, preform an examination, and order tests if needed.

      If blood tests come back fine then hypothyroidism, anemia, and hypoglycemia are eliminated.

      KLS is extremely rare and the patient does not fit the profile so it is eliminated.

      He uses no illicit drugs (confirmed by a 12 panel drug test), does not drink alcohol, does not use any OTC medication or other prescription drugs aside from his tetracycline and Cleocin T, he does not drink coffee/tea/soda or eat chocolate (so no caffeine).

      He undergoes a polysomnogram (a sleep study) and RLS, sleep apnoea, narcolepsy, primary insomnia and other sleep disorder are ruled out.

      Medical records and a physical and psychiatric examination eliminate PLMD, bipolar, and ADHD.

      However there are significant elements of generalized anxiety, depression, and insomnia.

      Upon further discussion and examination the patient reluctantly admits to having severe pain, numbness and tingling (paraesthesia), and muscle spasms in his right leg for over 6 months. A MRI shows a lumbar disc herniation at L5-S1, significantly pinching the sciatic nerve, causing the leg pain. He also has spinal stenosis.

      The doctor concludes severe pain is the cause of depression, anxiety, and insomnia all of which are common in people with chronic pain. The doctor also believes the anxiety and depression are partly related to the patients' incorrect belief that men should just tough it out, live with the pain, and think it is character building.

      The doctor prescribes:
      Percocet (oxycodone/acetaminophen) 5/325 1-2 tabs four times daily (#120 tabs)
      Restoril (temazepam) 7.5 mg for sleep (# 10) for ten days.
      Valium (diazepam) 2 mg tablets for muscle spasms X3 per day for ten days (#30)
      Elavil (amitriptyline) 75 mg at night (#14) for , depression anxiety, insomnia, and pain.

      And the patient is given a referral to orthopedics for possible interventions, surgery, and/or pain management.

      So from a large number of possible problems they are systematically eliminated until the correct diagnosis is determined.

      This example which is certainly not the best example, is more complicated than it would normally be and the order of tests is not how it would realistically be but hopefully you have a better understanding.

  33. QUESTION:
    Hair loss from Cymbalta! When will it stop and will it grow back?!?
    I was on Cymbalta for about two weeks and experienced massive hair loss almost immediately. My doctor recommended I stop taking it cold turkey and it's been a little over a week but the hair loss is just as excessive. My hair is at least half as thick as it was and I'm concerned about how much more I will lose. My question is how long until it stops falling out (If it will at all!) and will it all grow back? If so, how long will it take?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm sorry to hear, here is what i researched and I hope it will answer your question

      Hair loss due to stress and is a common problem which affects men and women of all ages. People have a lot of doubts when it comes to stress related hair loss - How does stress trigger a loss of hair? How serious is it? Can it be treated? Can it be prevented? Will hair grow back after treatment? Let us look at the answers to these questions.

      Hair loss due to stress - how does stress trigger it?

      Hair growth is a complex phenomenon. There is an active growth period where your hair grows actively for a period of about two years. Then there is a rest period where there is no growth. Then comes a fall period where the hair falls from your scalp. When your're stressed out, it has a negative effect on your entire body and your hair goes from active growth phase to rest phase very quickly. Then, within a few months, you start losing a considerable amount of hair. This process is usually called telogen effluvium.
      (Telogen effluvium is a scalp disorder characterized by massive hair loss as a result of early entry of hairs into the telogen phase. Emotional or physiological stressful events may result in an alteration of the normal hair cycle. It may be due to a variety of causes, eating disorders, fever, childbirth, chronic illness, major surgery, anemia, severe emotional disorders, crash diets, hypothyroidism, and drugs)

      What causes stress?

      This is an important question. People get stressed out for a number of reasons - job loss, pregnancy, child birth, accidents, death of loved ones, serious health problems, and so on. It differs from person to person. When people become depressed or stressed out due to any of these reasons, their physical and mental health gets affected and this leads to hair loss due to stress.

      How serious is this problem?

      It is not a serious problem at all if you do not mind going bald. Jokes apart, you will lose a lot of hair even before you start noticing it. While you might not go completely bald, there might be a noticeable difference in your scalp. In most cases, hair loss due to stress is a temporary phenomenon and the hair usually grows back after some time. However, in some cases, it could lead to permanent, long term hair loss.

      Can it be treated?

      Of course, it is possible to treat hair loss due to stress. The first thing you should do when you notice that you are losing a lot of hair is visit a good dermatologist. By asking you some questions and by doing some tests, he should be able to find the cause for your hair loss. If it is due to emotional stress, he might ask you to attend counseling sessions. He might also suggest taking multivitamin tablets and omega 3 fatty acid supplements to improve hair growth.

      Is it possible to prevent hair loss due to stress?

      There is no definite answer to this question. In most cases, extreme emotional stress is triggered by life-changing incidents like child birth, death of close friends or relatives, or sudden job loss. So, it is never possible to predict such incidents and avoid them in advance. However, there are certain things you can do to reduce the extent of damage considerably. They include regular physical exercise, eating a healthy diet, taking vitamins and omega 3 fatty acid supplements, and by using a mild shampoo and conditioner regularly.

      Will it grow back after treatment?

      In most cases, it will. However, in some cases, it could lead to long term hair loss. It depends on factors like your health and genetics.

      I hope this information was helpful

      unholyjulien->

  34. QUESTION:
    Question About Chronic Anaemia.?
    Does anyone have any ideas of what might cause chronic anemia? I have hypothyroidism and am on hormone replacement therapy. I have been under treatment sporadically for anemia since I was about 7, and I'm 35 now. It seems like I become anemic every time I stop taking iron supplements. It's as if my body lacks the ability to store iron. Could my history of anemia be related to my current situation? My doctor is sending me for an ultra sound to see if the cause could be fibroids, but I'm doubtful because I've had this since before I began menstruating. I also doubt it is dietary, because I eat red meat 7 days a week. I've been tested for just about everything from lupus to pernicious anemia, and nothing has turned up. I've tried researching articles, but there isn't anything on childhood anemia that doesn't eventually clear up. The only time I'm not anemic is when I've taken high doses of iron supplements, but this only helps for a month or two, then I'm anemic again.

    • ANSWER:
      www.healingwell.com ............you can talk 2 people with the same problem good site

  35. QUESTION:
    Why am I not sleeping at night?
    I get at lease 8 hours of sleep almost every night, and i don't feel stress or anything but if i go to be at 12:30am and get up at 9am but i feel tired around 11am or 12pm. what is going on with me how can i not feel tried all the time
    an its year around (all the time)

    • ANSWER:
      hey -

      There can be many, many causes of daytime sleepiness. The most common cause, however, is obstructive sleep apnea. It's a condition in which you continuously wake yourself up at night (>100x per night) without realizing that you're waking up. I don't know anything about you, so it may or may not be this. It's usually related to being overweight, having diabetes, and/or loud snoring.

      Other causes might include excessive caffeine intake or side effects from certain medications. Constant, huge amounts of caffeine can result in a "rebound", in which the opposite effects of caffeine actually result.

      Hypothyroidism is another cause...it's most often an autoimmune disorder (easily treated) that results in a slowed metabolic rate, fatigue, diarrhea, change in hair texture, change in skin texture, diabetes and heat intolerance.

      Another common cause is anemia - a lack of hemoglobin (iron deficiency is most common) deprives your vital organs of oxygen, forcing them to work less efficiently resulting in fatigue.

      Honestly, the list of reasons for "fatigue" are endless. But, these are the most common. And, since I don't know anything about you or your daily activities, it's hard to pinpoint exactly what it is.

      Hopefully this helps! I'd suggest getting a checkup since it seems to be hindering your life and your daily activities. Most of the conditions that cause "daytime sleepiness" can be treated.

      Good luck! :)

      Ryan

  36. QUESTION:
    Science question about THYROID and FETUS AT 9TH MONTH?
    what is the importance of vernix on the fetus at the 9th month? what affects happen of the maturation of the thryoid?????

    • ANSWER:
      Vernix caseosa is a creamy coating of the skin that protects the fetus from bumps and bruises. It also protects the skin from irritation or breakdown from floating in the amniotic fluid.

      The thyroid gland is a small gland located beneath the skin and muscles in the front section of your neck. Located just below the spot where a man’s Adam’s apple would form, the thyroid gland is responsible for manufacturing and releasing a number of different hormones. It’s primary hormone is known as thyroxine, or T4, which plays a large role in directing your body’s metabolism and growth functions.

      Hypothyroidism in Pregnancy
      Hypothyroidism is one of the most common types of thyroid disease occurring during pregnancy. In fact, between 2% and 4% of pregnant women have to contend with the disease.

      Symptoms of Hypothyroidism
      Symptoms of hypothyroidism are often difficult to detect during pregnancy, and may be mistaken for simple pregnancy discomforts. Symptoms include:

      •fatigue and weakness
      •weight gain
      •frequent muscle aches
      •cold intolerance

      Complications of Hypothyroidism During Pregnancy
      Once diagnosed, hypothyroidism typically requires daily treatment. Prompt treatment is especially important during pregnancy, because hypothyroidism can increase your risk of certain pregnancy complications including:

      •miscarriage
      •preterm labor
      •hypertension

      If left untreated, hypothyroidism can also put your child at risk for developmental problems. In fact, studies have shown that women with untreated hypothyroidism are four times more likely to give birth to a child with a low IQ.

      Treating Hypothyroidism During Pregnancy
      Quick treatment of hypothyroidism is essential during pregnancy. When treated during the first trimester, the risk of giving birth to a child with developmental issues is greatly reduced. Treatment typically involves taking daily doses of an artificial form of the thyroxine hormone.

      If you were diagnosed with hypothyroidism prior to pregnancy, your treatment dosages may have to be increased now that you are pregnant. This is because iron supplements and calcium supplements taken during pregnancy often interfere with thyroxine absorption. For this reason, always try to take your hypothyroidism medication on an empty stomach, either one hour prior to meals, or two hours after meals.

      Hyperthyroidism During Pregnancy
      Hyperthyroidism can also occur during pregnancy. This type of thyroid disease affects one in every 500 hundred pregnant women. It can develop prior to pregnancy or it may manifest for the first time during pregnancy.

      Symptoms of Hyperthyroidism
      As with hypothyroidism, the symptoms of hyperthyroidism are often difficult to diagnose during pregnancy. Pregnancy frequently works to mask the symptoms, which may include:

      •weight loss
      •fatigue and weakness
      •nausea and vomiting
      •sweating
      •heat intolerance

      Complications of Hyperthyroidism During Pregnancy
      If hyperthyroidism is treated throughout your pregnancy, than you and your baby are at no increased risk of any health related problems. Most women who are treated for the disease go on to experience normal pregnancies. However, if you are suffering from uncontrolled or untreated hyperthyroidism, than you are at increased risk for:

      •miscarriage or stillbirth
      •preeclampsia
      •iron deficiency-related anemia
      •infection

      Though labor and delivery is usually unaffected by the disease, there is also a risk of developing "thyroid storm." This life-threatening condition is associated with exacerbated hyperthyroidism symptoms, including:

      •extremely high fever
      •severe vomiting and diarrhea
      •very high heart rate

      Treating Hyperthyroidism During Pregnancy
      If you are pregnant and think that you may be suffering from hyperthyroidism, then it essential to seek appropriate treatment. Your health care provider will perform a blood test and measure your thyroid hormone levels.

      Treatment for hyperthyroidism involves lowering the amount of thyroid hormone to more acceptable levels. Generally, this involves taking the mediation propylthiouracil. This medication is entirely safe to take during pregnancy, and should be continued throughout your three trimesters, as well as after labor and delivery. If your health care provider is having difficulty controlling your thyroid hormone levels, she may suggest surgery to remove the thyroid hormone altogether.

      Women diagnosed with hyperthyroidism prior to pregnancy should make an appointment with their health care provider to have their hormone levels measured and to discuss changing the dose of their medication.

      Whether you have hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism, it is important to have your thyroid levels regularly monitored throughout your pregnancy. Because your thyroid levels can change from month to month, it may be necessary to adjust your medication dosage at various points during your pregnancy.

  37. QUESTION:
    what is the cause of pins and needles in the body?

    • ANSWER:
      Pins and needles' (paraesthesia) is a sensation of uncomfortable tingling or prickling, usually felt in the hands or feet. The affected area is sometimes said to have 'fallen asleep'. A common cause is leaning or lying awkwardly on a limb, which either presses against the nerves or reduces the blood supply to the local area. Changing position quickly restores normal feeling. Any numbness is soon replaced by the tingling and prickling sensation, as the nerves start sending messages again to the brain and spinal cord. In some cases, pins and needles are caused by nerve damage or certain disorders of the central nervous system. Always see your doctor if you experience frequent or persistent bouts of pins and needles.

      Symptoms
      The symptoms of pins and needles include:

      * Hands and feet are usually affected
      * Initial numbness and heaviness
      * Prickling and tingling sensation on the skin
      * Return of normal feeling a few minutes after changing position.

      A range of causes
      Pins and needles can be caused by a wide range of events and conditions, including:

      * Pressure on nerves
      * Reduced blood supply
      * Nerve injury
      * Hyperventilation or breathing excessively
      * The effect of toxic substances on the nerves, such as alcohol or lead
      * Certain medications
      * Diabetes
      * Multiple sclerosis
      * Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid gland)
      * Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA)
      * Stroke.

      Pressure-related pins and needles
      The peripheral nerves of the body send information back to the brain and spinal cord. When a sensory nerve is pressed by a cramped or awkward position, its functioning starts to falter. In time, the affected limb 'falls asleep', which means the sensory messages are blocked. Once pressure is taken off the nerve, functioning resumes. The uncomfortable prickling sensation is caused by the resumption of pain messages from nerves to the brain. Other nerves, such as those that provide information on temperature, take a little longer to recover.

      Pinched nerve
      Nerves can be pinched by bones and other tissue. Some examples include:

      * Carpal tunnel syndrome - the main nerve that services the hand runs through a ring of wrist bones. Inflamed and swollen tendon membranes reduce the amount of room inside the wrist and squash the nerve. Symptoms include pins and needles, pain and weakness.
      * Cervical nerve root irritation - nerves in the neck exit the spinal cord via small holes between the vertebrae. These small holes can be narrowed by inflammation, trauma or outgrowths of bone tissue (bone spurs). The nerves are compressed, causing pins and needles and, sometimes, referred pain into the arms.
      * Sciatica - the legs and feet are serviced by the sciatic nerve, which starts as four nerve roots between the vertebrae of the lower back. Each vertebra is cushioned by discs of cartilage. A prolapsed or 'slipped' disc bulges out and presses against one of the roots of the sciatic nerve, causing pins and needles and referred pain down the leg.

      Neuritis
      Neuritis is inflammation of the nerves. Some of the causes include:

      * Alcohol - chronic overconsumption of alcohol can be toxic to nerves and cause a condition called peripheral neuropathy, characterised by pins and needles.
      * Guillain-Barre syndrome - thought to be triggered by some kinds of viral infection.
      * Pernicious anaemia - causes a vitamin B12 deficiency that affects the functioning of the spinal cord.

      Nerve disease
      Nerve disease, or neuropathy, is characterised by the lack of sensory information to the brain due to damage of the sensory nerves. For example, a person with neuropathy may not experience pain to the normal degree, if at all. Conditions that may damage the sensory nerves include:

      * Severed spinal cord
      * Diabetes
      * Charcot-Marie-Tooth inherited neuropathy
      * Exposure to certain drugs and heavy metals, such as lead
      * Chronic overconsumption of alcohol.

      Seek medical advice
      The occasional bout of pins and needles is a harmless event. However, chronic pins and needles can be symptomatic of some other underlying disorder. Always see your doctor for a thorough medical investigation if you experience persistent or frequent episodes of numbness or pins and needles.

      Treatment options
      Treatment depends on the cause. For example, carpal tunnel syndrome may be treated with rest, splinting and medications such as anti-inflammatory and diuretic drugs. A nerve pinched by bone or some other tissue may need chiropractic or physiotherapy, or perhaps surgery to ease the pressure and allow full nerve functioning to resume. Underlying conditions such as diabetes need to be properly controlled to ease associated symptoms, including pins and needles. The symptoms of nerve inflammation and damage caused by chronic overconsumption of alcohol generally improve once the person stops drinking.

      Where to get help

      * Your doctor.

      Things to remember

      * 'Pins and needles' is a sensation of uncomfortable tingling or prickling, usually felt in the hands or feet.
      * A common cause is leaning awkwardly on a limb, which presses against the nerves.
      * Persistent pins and needles may be symptomatic of more serious conditions, such as nerve disease or nerve inflammation.
      * Always see your doctor if you experience persistent or frequent episodes of pins and needles.

  38. QUESTION:
    Effects of Pernicious Anaemia?
    I have suffered with Pernicious Anaemia now for the last 15 years and although I understand more or less most things I need to know about the condition, I was hoping some one out there could shed a little light on the condition as to my joints, I have of late started to suffer with my right knee, the pain is getting worse, but its behind my knee, I was wondering if it was to do with this, I have my B12 injections on e ampule every month which I need as my Pernicious Anaemia is very bad, so need to have them every month for the rest of my life, to cap it all I don't produce acid in my stomache, my body has killed off the T cells that produce Acid, please help me!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Pernicious anemia does not typically cause arthritis so the joint pain may be unrelated.

      Vitamin B12 is needed to produce an adequate amount of healthy red blood cells in the bone marrow. Vitamin B12 is available only in animal foods (meat and dairy products) or yeast extracts (such as brewer's yeast). Vitamin B12 deficiency is defined by low levels of stored B12 in the body that can result in anemia, a lower-than-normal number of red blood cells.

      Vitamin B12 deficiency can develop for the following reasons:

      Absence of intrinsic factor, also called pernicious anemia — Intrinsic factor is a protein secreted by cells of the stomach lining. Intrinsic factor attaches to vitamin B12 and takes it to the intestines to be absorbed. An absence of intrinsic factor is the most common cause of pernicious anemia, and it typically causes the stomach lining to shrink (atrophy). This condition often is seen in elderly people of African-American or Northern-European descent. In these people, pernicious anemia develops at about age 60. In children, decreased levels of intrinsic factor can be an inherited (genetic) condition. When this happens, low levels of intrinsic factor produce symptoms of juvenile pernicious anemia in patients younger than age 10. Pernicious anemia occurs more commonly in people who already have diseases that are linked to immune-system abnormalities, such as Graves' disease, hypothyroidism (under-functioning thyroid gland), thyroiditis (inflammation of the thyroid), vitiligo and Addison's disease (adrenocortical insufficiency).

      Removal or destruction of the stomach — Vitamin B12 deficiency can develop in people who have had surgery to remove part or all of the stomach.

      Overgrowth of bacteria — Some people develop vitamin B12 deficiency as a result of conditions that slow the movement of food through the intestines (diabetes, scleroderma, strictures, diverticula) , allowing intestinal bacteria to multiply and overgrow in the upper part of the small intestine. These bacteria steal B12 for their own use, rather than allowing it to be absorbed by the body.

      Dietary deficiency — Vegans (strict vegetarians who do not eat any meat, fish, egg or dairy products) can develop vitamin B12 deficiency because they lack vitamin B12 in their diets. In patients with bulimia or anorexia nervosa, vitamin B12 deficiency also can be related to diet. However, your liver can store vitamin B12 for up to five years, so it's rare for diet to cause this anemia.
      Symptoms

      Symptoms tend to develop slowly and may not be recognized immediately. As the condition worsens, common symptoms include:

      Weakness and fatigue
      Light-headedness and dizziness
      Palpitations and rapid heartbeat
      Shortness of breath
      A sore tongue that has a red, beefy appearance
      Nausea or poor appetite
      Weight loss
      Diarrhea
      Yellowish tinge to the skin and eyes
      If low levels of B12 remain for a long time, the condition also can lead to irreversible damage to nerve cells, which can cause the following symptoms:

      Numbness and tingling in the hands and feet
      Difficulty walking
      Muscle weakness
      Irritability
      Memory loss
      Dementia
      Depression
      Psychosis

      Diagnosis

      Your doctor will ask you about your diet and about any family history of anemia. Your doctor also will review your medical history for medical illnesses (diabetes, immune disorders) or surgeries, such as stomach removal, that can lead to B12 deficiency.

      Your doctor may suspect that you have vitamin B12 deficiency based on your medical history and symptoms. To confirm the diagnosis, he or she will examine you and order laboratory tests. During the physical examination, your doctor will look for a red, beefy tongue, pale or yellowish skin, a rapid pulse and heart murmurs resulting from an anemia-related increase in blood flow demands on the heart. Laboratory tests will include:

      Standard blood tests to measure the level of red blood cells and check their appearance — In vitamin B12 deficiency, red blood cells are unusually large and appear abnormal.

      Blood tests to measure B12 levels — Levels of iron and folate also may be measured to check for deficiencies in these nutrients.

      Blood test to measure methylmalonic acid level — The blood level of methylmalonic acid increases when a person has B12 deficiency.

      Blood tests for intrinsic factor antibody — Your doctor may order special tests for antibody levels to determine if you have pernicious anemia. Most people who lack intrinsic factor in their stomach have these antibodies in their blood.

      Bone marrow biopsy — Occasionally, a bone marrow biopsy is done to help confirm the diagnosis. In this procedure, a small sample of bone marrow is taken by inserting a needle into the pelvic bone just below the waist on either side of the spine. The bone marrow sample is examined in a laboratory to look for other causes of anemia and red blood cell abnormalities.
      Expected Duration

      With proper treatment, symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency begin to improve within a few days. In vegans and other people whose B12 deficiency is diet-related, oral B12 supplements and a diet designed to increase consumption of vitamin B12 should cure the condition. People with pernicious anemia or people who cannot absorb vitamin B12 from their intestines will need injections of vitamin B12 every one to three months indefinitely.

      Prevention

      To prevent vitamin B12 deficiency, vegans should take adequate amounts of vitamin B12 supplements to make up for the shortage in their diet.

      For people who cannot absorb B12, the condition cannot be prevented. However, once it is diagnosed, regular injections of vitamin B12 will prevent symptoms from returning.

      Treatment

      Treatment for this condition involves replacing the missing vitamin B12. People who cannot absorb B12 need regular injections. When injections first are administered, a patient with severe symptoms may receive five to seven during the first week to restore the body's reserves of this nutrient. A response usually is seen within 48 to 72 hours, with brisk production of new red blood cells. Once B12 reserves reach normal levels, injections of vitamin B12 will be needed every one to three months to prevent symptoms from returning. People who cannot absorb vitamin B12 should continue to eat a well-balanced diet that provides other nutrients (folic acid, iron and vitamin C) necessary to produce healthy blood cells. Sometimes people can take high doses of oral B12 to provide replacement instead of undergoing injections, but a physician should closely supervise this.

      In people whose vitamin B12 deficiency is related to overgrowth of intestinal bacteria, treatment with oral antibiotics, such as tetracycline (sold under several brand names) or ampicillin (Omnipen, Polycillin) may stop bacterial overgrowth and allow the absorption of vitamin B12 to return to normal.

      Vitamin B12 deficiency resulting from inadequate dietary intake is the easiest to treat. The condition can be reversed by taking oral vitamin B12 supplements and adding foods containing B12.

      When the anemia is severe and the red blood cell count is extremely low, blood transfusions may be necessary for the first couple of days until the vitamin B12 injections begin working.

      When To Call A Professional

      Contact your doctor for a physical examination if you experience unexplained fatigue, palpitations, shortness of breath, sore tongue or any other symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency. This is especially true if you are a vegan, are older than age 50 and of African-American or Northern-European descent, have diabetes, have an autoimmune disorder or have had your stomach removed.

      Prognosis

      The outlook is excellent because this form of anemia responds well to treatment. However, it is possible that nerve cell damage will be permanent. Some residual damage to the nervous system may remain in people who sought treatment late in the illness.

  39. QUESTION:
    Is 104/66 considered low blood pressure?
    My extremities are almost always cold and I tend to be more sensitive to the cold. Could this possibly be related to low blood pressure or anything else?

    • ANSWER:
      104/66 is on the low end of normal. However, it shouldn't be low enough to be related to your cold extremities. Some people just have better circulation to their extremities than others. I'm not sure if you are male or female, but it seems that females tend to have worse circulation in their extremities and are more prone to them being/feeling cold.
      You need to visit the doctor and have some tests done. Your doctor can test you for many causes of being unusually cold, such as anemia, hypoglycemia, hypothyroidism, poor circulation due to peripheral vascular disease or coronary artery disease, Raynaud's syndrome, etc.
      Best wishes to you and in the meantime, exercise your arms and legs to encourage blood circulation and therefore warmth...

  40. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism?
    I just had some blood tests and had my thyroid checked. I read up on some of the symptoms and felt I had a lot of the symptoms relating to Hypothyroidism such as tiredness, anemia, weight gain, constipation, aches, feeling cold, dry skin, lifeless hair,hair loss, mental slowing, and depression,a hoarse voice, heavy menstrual periods and numbness and tingling in hands.
    I got my results today and my thyroid was at 3.5. My Doc said it wasn't an optimum level but in the normal range.
    Could I have a low level hypothyroidism and how can I get my thyroid levels to a better level so that I can feel better?

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of hypothyroidism: Fatigue, constipation, intolerance to cold, and muscle cramps
      Later symptoms include mental clouding diminished appetite, and weight gain.

      Some other signs may be brittle fingernails and dry hair.

      You need tests to confirm, but it sounds like you have it. However, the prognosis is great. You may have to undergo hormone relacement therapy, but that is easy. But if you experience hypothermia and stupor, you require immidiate medical attention.

      Have your doctor test your T4 and T3 levels.

      By the way, I'm not a doctor. So dont take my advise over any real medical professionals. I'm just a high school freshman who wants to be a doctor one day.

      Get well. Let me know if I was correct,
      Jake P

  41. QUESTION:
    My hair is falling out more than normal (I'm a teen)?
    Lately my hair has been falling out more than normal. Whenever I comb it or wash it a lot comes out, but not in clumps. I'm pretty sure its not hair loss. I have hypothyroidism and lately I haven't been taking my medicine too regularly. Is that related? Also, I was recently in the hospital due to an accident, an I was anemic. Should I take iron pills if thats related to this problem? Thanks.
    i have hypo-thyroid which is very different from hyper-thyroid
    and the meds have different side affects
    my hairs a 100% natural no dye or anything

    • ANSWER:
      The average young-adult woman loses 50-100 strands per day. Most often this occurs during showering and hair brushing. Hypothyroidism can be a very serious disorder. I know it can be difficult to stay on a medicinal regime, but not taking them can be very detrimental to your health. I don't believe it is related to your hair loss though. About the anemia; taking a multi-vitamin is usually sufficient. However, you really need to talk to your doctor about this stuff, especially your hypothyroidism and anemia.

  42. QUESTION:
    could i be a patient of hypothyroidism? please, read?
    i was reading about and i definitely show a lot of the symptoms. i'm always tired (sleep during the day), i have gained weight, i'm always cold (i'm wrapped up in a blanket and still shivering), i've been depressed lately, i have a very dry scalp, dry and flaky elbows, i have high cholorsteral levels, i get a lot of headaches and pains in my stomach, and i have my period around 3 times a year.

    what are the chances that i'm a patient of hypothyroidism? if not that, what else could be wrong with me?

    • ANSWER:
      It's definitely a possibility, the best thing to do is go to the dr. and find out. They check it with a blood test, and that can also tell them if you some other possible things, like anemia which has some of those symptoms too. I was checked for it recently because I had some of the symptoms and my mom has had hypothyroidism since I was a kid. Anyway, I don't have it, just a little anemia combined with depression/anxiety. Just go get it checked, only way to know for sure!

      Also, the period thing may not be related, if you have always had that few periods than I wouldn't worry, but if has been a recent change then it can be an indication that something in you're body isn't working right, so get it checked!

  43. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism and Thyroid Levels?
    I just had some blood tests and had my thyroid checked. I read up on some of the symptoms and felt I had a lot of the symptoms relating to Hypothyroidism such as tiredness, anemia, weight gain, constipation, aches, feeling cold, dry skin, lifeless hair,hair loss, mental slowing, and depression,a hoarse voice, heavy menstrual periods and numbness and tingling in hands.
    I got my results today and my thyroid was at 3.5. My Doc said it wasn't an optimum level but in the normal range.
    Could I have a low level hypothyroidism and how can I get my thyroid levels to a better level so that I can feel better?

    • ANSWER:
      AACE changed the range to 0.3 to 3.0 years ago. Unfortunately labs like Quest haven't changed it yet and many doctors are unaware of the change. See TSH links below. With your TSH and symptoms, you are hypothyroid now. Don't wait for treatment because its only going to get worse. Remember to always test TSH first thing in the morning when its near its high point. One on treatment the goal is to get a morning TSH under 2.0, closer to 1.0

  44. QUESTION:
    Varied symptoms, unknown cause...any insight would be appreciated.?
    I'm a 23 year old female without any sort of bad medical history. I'm on the pill, and have no conditions to speak of. I eat well and exercise regularly.

    In the past months though, I've been experiencing sudden episodes of weakness, light-headedness, extreme, sudden fatigue and nausea, which last about 20-30 mins. I'm generally tired. It usually happens in the evenings. I have had many recent changes in my life, which I think are to blame...

    But could this *really* all be stress-related? When these episodes happen, I'm never particularly anxious, or stressed, they seem very random. I will be consulting a DR, but any advice would be welcome. It's all very weird, and disconcerting, to be honest. How much can stress really affect my health, and if it's not stress, then what? (I've already ruled out pregnancy and hypothyroidism or anemia.) Thanks for your help.
    *It's also important to note that I drink 1,5 litres of water a day, exercise every day, and do not drink any sort of soda. I've changed my diet radically over the past few years, and it's generally healthy.

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds to me like stress and a bit of tension. I experienced something similar. Worrying about it also adds to it.

      You should do some relaxing excercises during the day, just a few where you stretch a bit, breathing excercises and even some walking.

      Try try changing some of your regular routines, maybe take a friday or monday off to extend your weekend and don't worry too much.

  45. QUESTION:
    Why am I always so cold?
    First off, NO I don't do drugs.
    im only 13.
    I wear a jacket everyday at school and i am shivering all day!
    its only like 82 degrees outside.
    Why am I freezing?

    • ANSWER:
      Feeling Cold All The Time
      The tendency to feel cold is indicative of circulatory problems and issues, as it is blood flow which causes us to have a sensation of warmth. A perfectly healthy individual can feel cold all the time if they live with "hot" people who over air condition their environment or if they frequent public establishments that are run by "hot" people who tend to over air condition their environment--or is it just me?

      Here are more opinions and answers from other WikiAnswers Contributors:

      LOW THYROID FUNCTION. Try drenamin and go check out this web site www.gohealthgirl.com. She had that problem, her diet helps you to regain circulation.

      You could be anemic.

      One possibility is hypothyroidism , in which levels of thyroid hormone are below normal.

      There are many causes of feeling cold all the time. This could be from anemia or a thyroid disorder or circulatory problems related to diabetes, high cholesterol or many various other disorders. You should see your family doctor for a routine check up and labwork to know for sure!

      I know another answer, although insignificant, apparently, not getting enough affection, can make you cold. I read it in my textbook because I'm studying childcare and they did tests and all that.

      Some people don't have enough muscle mass or the insulating fat layer which helps keep most people warm. The muscles help warm the body, while the fat layer helps keep the heat where it belongs. There is also a possibility or hormone imbalance.

      Raynaud's Disease. Do a search for that, you will find good information about this condition. It is bad circulation in your feet, fingers and nose. Your body temperature is always lower than most people. You will be surrounded by people who love "air conditioning", yet the heater is your best friend. I hate the winter, because it is so hard to stay warm, without melting co-workers or my husband. LOL. Good luck. No treatment is found for this, my research has shown it to be annoying more than a health issue.

      One reason people feel Cold, in hands and feet, can be due to dips in blood pressure. This is acctually fairly common as it is caused by not drinking enough water. Drink more water and see if it helps. The drops in blood pressure also can cause 'black outs', fainting or dizzy spells...

  46. QUESTION:
    Need help with pins and needles in legs!!!?
    So my dad suffered from a disease that attacked his spinal cord. Some symptoms he got were pains in his legs and pins & needles that wouldn't go away for ages. Recently ive been getting pins and needles in my feet that wouldn't go away for 10 minutes. Sometimes I wake up with them (like my dad did). I can't really remember what it was called, but at first the doctors thought it was MS. If anyone can sorta tell me whats happening that would be awesome :).

    • ANSWER:
      Pins and needles

      "Pins and needles"(paresthesia) is a sensation of uncomfortable tingling or prickling, usually felt in the hands or feet. The affected area is sometimes said to have ‘fallen asleep’.

      In some cases, pins and needles are caused by nerve damage or certain disorders of the central nervous system. Always see your doctor if you experience frequent or persistent bouts of pins and needles.

      Symptoms
      The symptoms of pins and needles include:

      Hands and feet are usually affected
      Initial numbness and heaviness
      Prickling and tingling sensation on the skin
      Return of normal feeling a few minutes after changing position.

      A range of causes
      Pins and needles can be caused by a wide range of events and conditions, including:
      Pressure on nerves
      Reduced blood supply
      Nerve injury
      Hyperventilation or breathing excessively
      The effect of toxic substances on the nerves, such as alcohol or lead
      Certain medications
      Diabetes
      Multiple sclerosis
      Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid gland)
      Transient ischaemic attack (TIA)
      Stroke.
      Pressure-related pins and needles
      The peripheral nerves of the body send information back to the brain and spinal cord. When a sensory nerve is pressed by a cramped or awkward position, its functioning starts to falter. In time, the affected limb ‘falls asleep’, which means the sensory messages are blocked. Once pressure is taken off the nerve, functioning resumes. The uncomfortable prickling sensation is caused by the resumption of pain messages from nerves to the brain. Other nerves, such as those that provide information on temperature, take a little longer to recover.

      Pinched nerve
      Nerves can be pinched by bones and other tissue.

      Some examples include:
      Carpal tunnel syndrome – the main nerve that services the hand runs through a ring of wrist bones. Inflamed and swollen tendon membranes reduce the amount of room inside the wrist and squash the nerve. Symptoms include pins and needles, pain and weakness.

      Cervical nerve root irritation – nerves in the neck exit the spinal cord via small holes between the vertebrae. These small holes can be narrowed by inflammation, trauma or outgrowths of bone tissue (bone spurs). The nerves are compressed, causing pins and needles and, sometimes, referred pain into the arms
      .
      Sciatica – the legs and feet are serviced by the sciatic nerve, which starts as four nerve roots between the vertebrae of the lower back. Each vertebra is cushioned by discs of cartilage. A prolapsed or ‘slipped’ disc bulges out and presses against one of the roots of the sciatic nerve, causing pins and needles and referred pain down the leg.

      Neuritis
      Neuritis is inflammation of the nerves.

      Some of the causes include:
      Alcohol – chronic overconsumption of alcohol can be toxic to nerves and cause a condition called peripheral neuropathy, characterised by pins and needles.

      Guillain-Barre syndrome – thought to be triggered by some kinds of viral infection.

      Pernicious anemia – causes a vitamin B12 deficiency that affects the functioning of the spinal cord.

      Nerve disease
      Nerve disease, or neuropathy, is characterized by the lack of sensory information to the brain due to damage of the sensory nerves. For example, a person with neuropathy may not experience pain to the normal degree, if at all.

      Conditions that may damage the sensory nerves include:
      Severed spinal cord
      Diabetes
      Charcot-Marie-Tooth inherited neuropathy
      Exposure to certain drugs and heavy metals, such as lead
      Chronic overconsumption of alcohol.

      Treatment
      Treatment depends on the cause. For example, carpal tunnel syndrome may be treated with rest, splinting and medications such as anti-inflammatory and diuretic drugs. A nerve pinched by bone or some other tissue may require physiotherapy or (in some cases) surgery to ease the pressure and allow full nerve functioning to resume.

      Underlying conditions such as diabetes need to be properly controlled to ease associated symptoms, including pins and needles. The symptoms of nerve inflammation and damage caused by chronic overconsumption of alcohol generally improve once the person stops drinking

      Things to remember
      ‘Pins and needles’ is a sensation of uncomfortable tingling or prickling, usually felt in the hands or feet.
      A common cause is leaning awkwardly on a limb, which presses against the nerves.
      Persistent pins and needles may be symptomatic of more serious conditions, such as nerve disease or nerve inflammation.

      The occasional bout of pins and needles is a harmless event. However, chronic pins and needles can be symptomatic of some other underlying disorder. Always see your doctor for a thorough medical investigation if you experience persistent or frequent episodes of numbness or pins and needles.

      I suspect the cause of your "pins and needles" is due to a common cause of leaning or lying awkwardly on a limb, which either presses against the nerves or reduces the blood supply to the local area. Changing position can quickly restore a normal feeling. Any numbness is soon replaced by a tingling and prickling sensation, as the nerves start sending messages again to the brain and spinal cord.

  47. QUESTION:
    Why am I always tired?
    I am a 14 year old girl who sleeps 8 hours a night. I have been tired every day for about 2 years. I have constant headaches because of it. It takes about an hour to fall asleep. I don't drink too much caffeeine. Please please help. I can't handle being tired anymore.

    • ANSWER:
      Mental Health?

      Go get a physical and bloodwork. Could be several different things related to physical health. Blood tests will rule out:

      Anemia
      Hypothyroidism
      Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)
      Hormonal imbalance
      Infection
      Hepatitis
      Jaundice
      Diabetes
      Malnutrition
      Dehydration
      Electrolyte imbalance
      Vitamin deficiency
      Mononucleosis

      Could also be dysthymia, chronic, low-grade, long-term depression.

      Also post your question in "Women's Health" category for more answers.

  48. QUESTION:
    What is a heart murmur?

    • ANSWER:
      I personally was diagnosed with one a few years ago was sent to a cardiologist who said it was nothing to worry about it. Since then, it was not detected when I had physicals. I know many people who were diagnosed with them and they were nothing.

      Here's some info from webmd:

      In particular, they occur in many healthy children, who may or may not outgrow them as adults. They may also occur during pregnancy. Such murmurs are called "innocent" heart murmurs. They are not associated with medical or heart conditions, and do not require treatment or lifestyle changes.

      Though many murmurs are innocent, some may indicate serious heart problems. For instance, heart murmurs may be caused by blood flowing through a heart valve made leaky or narrow by disease. Murmurs can also be caused by increased blood flow across a valve as a result of medical conditions such as anemia or hypothyroidism. Congenital cardiac defects (heart problems present at birth) can also cause heart murmurs. These often can be repaired with surgery.

      Within the heart there are four chambers separated from each other by valves, or flaps, that regulate how much blood enters each chamber at any time. Healthy valves also help prevent blood from flowing in the wrong direction in your heart.

      A healthy heart makes a "lub-dub" sound as it beats. The "lub" (systolic sound) happens when part of the heart contracts and the mitral and tricuspid valves close, and the "dub" (diastolic sound) occurs when part of the heart relaxes and the aortic and pulmonic valves close. A heart murmur is an extra sound, such as a whooshing, in the heartbeat caused by irregular blood flow through the heart valves.

      Heart murmurs can be heard through a stethoscope and often are detected during routine physical examinations. On further examination, your doctor may find that the heart murmur is innocent. If your heart murmur is related to more serious heart problems, your doctor may refer you to a cardiologist (heart specialist). Medication or surgery may be recommended to treat the underlying problem. He or she may also suggest that you take extra precautions against getting a heart infection, such as by taking antibiotics when you have dental work or some surgeries. With thorough examination and proper tests, your doctor should be able to tell what causes your heart murmur.

      Symptoms
      Many people with heart murmurs experience no symptoms. However, some murmurs can occur in conjunction with these other symptoms:

      * Chest pain
      * Rapid heartbeat (palpitations)
      * Breathlessness
      * Fatigue
      * Bluish skin color or fingertips (sometimes seen in babies with congenital heart defects)

  49. QUESTION:
    Cancer and Kidney Stones?
    After peeing blood for a few weeks, ultrasound showed kidney stones. I have had stacks before.

    I also have periods of malaise, fatigue, anemia, chills etc.

    Can kidney stones be a symptom of cancer?

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      This can be due to hypercalcemia - or an increase of calcium in the blood. Have the doctor check your thyroid hormones, all of your symptoms including the kidney stones could be directly related.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypothyroidism

      Look and see if you have any other symptoms you may be missing.

      Osteoporosis would be related to high calcium in the blood.
      Low basal body temp would explain the chills.
      Muscle cramps and poor tone would explain the malaise.
      Anemia and fatigue go hand in hand and are both symptoms.

  50. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism maybe?
    My TSH is 1.69 and my Free T4 is 1.1. I don't see the doctor until the end of February. My cholesterol is 195 and triglycerides at 160. I am not any any medications other than Januvia for insulin resistance. My blood glucose is at 78. Bloodwork was done fasting. I am trying to figure out if I have hypothyroidism and research what can be done about it. I have hair loss, cold extremities even though I live in Florida, fatigue, bascially a lot of the symptoms. I have been on a rigorous diet for 6 months now and have only lost about 7 pounds. I don't cheat so I can't figure out why I am not losing weight. I am also exercising 3-4 times a week. Does anyone have any idea what these levels mean? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      TSH stands for Thyroid Stimulating Hormone. Your pituitary makes TSH in a feedback relationship with your thyroid. When your thyroid function is low, your pituitary releases more TSH to get your thyroid working. When your thyroid function is high, your pituitary makes less TSH.

      Your TSH is in normal range, which is usually defined as anything less than 4. Higher than 4 indicates hypothyroidism. When I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism, my TSH was about 9. I've been on thyroid medication for years and now I'm comfortably in the 2.x range.

      Your Free T4 is also normal (.8 - 1.7).

      Your symptoms sound a little like anemia. Have you been tested for that?

      Your blood sugar is excellent. Your triglycerides are elevated, which is common in people with insulin resistance. Your cholesterol is borderline, but that's also common in people with IR. Also, I'm not a big believer that total cholesterol matters - what matters much more for heart health is your breakdown of LDL and HDL, as well as what type of LDL you have. Triglycerides are also very important and you can lower those, and your insulin levels--important for a person with IR--by low carbing.

      This is all off topic, but I would look into anemia. This may also be diet related.

how are anemia and hypothyroidism related