Enlarged Thyroid Symptoms And Causes

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Does an enlarged thyroid make you more sexually aggressive?
    I havean enlarged thyroid. The doctors are keeping a close eye on it, since it runs in the family, but they said as of bow mine is perfectly healthy and I am in no risk of infections or diseases. So, does an enlarged thyroid make you more sexually agressive? How else does it affect you?

    • ANSWER:
      Never heard of any of the thyroid problems to cause sexual 'aggression' but have heard many times that it causes LOSS of sexual desire. This could be hypO or hypER. There are way too many possible symptoms to list here. Google 'Mary Shomon' and 'Stop the Thyroid Madness' for good info on what you might expect.

      Blessings

  2. QUESTION:
    What are causes of an enlarged thyroid besides cancer or hyper/ hypo thyroidsim?
    I'm a 23 year old female. I was told my two different doctors that I have an enlarged thyroid. The both gave me the thc test and it came back normal. Neither doctor went any further with it and I'm worried. I have all the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

    • ANSWER:
      That is called a goiter, and it has no other causes. If you have all of the other symptoms of hypothyroidism too, in addition to the goiter, you need to get treatment for your hypothyroidism.

      Get your ducks in a row first though. You had a TSH blood test. Thyroid stimulating hormone. You didn't have a blood test for pot. It's really hard to get a doctor to take you seriously when you have a thyroid condition in the first place (as you found out). You have to do your research before you go in, know more than the doctor, and know what tests to demand. If you do things like get he names of the tests wrong, you'll never get treatment.

      That being said, TSH is a useless test. All it means is that you need further testing. Every Dr. will use it for diagnosis, but it can't be used for diagnosis. It is an indirect test, so it's ridiculous to diagnose based on it. You need a direct test of your thyroid. That is Free T3 and Free T4. See how those come out. They are the definitive tests for a thyroid problem.

      It took me until my 3rd doctor to get a diagnosis of my thyroid problem, and until my 6th doctor before I could get some help with my symptoms. So I know what you are going through. Hang in there. Find a new doctor. If that one can't help you, find another one.

  3. QUESTION:
    What is the best treatment for mild hyperthyroiism?
    According to blood work it is mild but it does need treatment because of symptoms. Extreme nervousness & anxiousness, insomnia, rapid heartbeat, heat intolerance, constant low grade fever.There are no nodules so I don't think surgery is an option. It may probably caused by a slightly enlarged thyroid or possibly graves disease.
    I have appointment with Dr. I'm just trying to do my research

    • ANSWER:
      reduce iodine intake (no iodised salt, no seafood, no kelp or seaweed) propylthiouracil or neomercazole/tapazole/carbimazole are the standard treatments, the only permanent solution if it persists is radio iodine, if you can get a specialist skilled enough he can give a dose that will reduce output of thyroxine rather than destroy the thyroid completely, it is also possible that you are hypersensitive to thyroxine and react more strongly to even a small excess than normal

  4. QUESTION:
    What causes an enlarged thyroid and how to avoid it?
    What are the symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      The thyroid gland can be enlarged for the following reasons:
      1) Enlargement due to iodine deficiency. Rare in developed nations. The gland gets bigger to try and compensate for decreased thyroid hormone production due to nutritional deficiency of iodine.
      2) Enlarged because it is inflamed. Can happen with both underactive and overactive thyroid, so the symptoms would vary. With overactive thyroid such as in Graves Disease, there would be fast heart rate, weight loss, feeling hot all the time. With underactive thyroid, there would be fatigue, feeling cold, gaining weight.
      3) Enlarged due to benign nodules. Called a multinodular goitre, this is usually without symptoms. Ultrasound can confirm the diagnosis and also ensure that none of the nodules look like they need biopsy.
      4) Enlargement due to a cyst or multiple cysts. Can be drained by the physician, but would be prudent to look with ultrasound and perhaps biopsy.
      5) Enlarged due to cancerous growth. Rather rare, but your physician can decide whether the thyroid needs a biopsy.

  5. QUESTION:
    What are the medical problems related to hyperactive thyroid? Does it affect organs , growth?
    Son has hyperactive thyroid just eager to find out what to expect. Hes 4 years old. He weighs 30 pounds he eats good ,and is very very active. Give him daily vitamins and always make sure he goes to bed with a fulle belly. But fighting a losing battle. Waiting on doctor to see him. Has flu rite now so cant run test but doctor is pretty sure thats what it is. What medications are available and what are the side effects? Will he gain too much weight afterwards ?

    • ANSWER:
      Common causes of hyperthyroidism are :
      * Grave's disease
      * Toxic multinodular goiter
      * Solitary toxic adenoma

      Also : * De Quervan's subacute thyroiditis.

      There are a few other conditions where hyperthyroidism can sometimes occur.

      Individuals with hyperthyroidism are hyperactive, restless, prefer cooler places, may feel excessively hot and have excessive sweating, palpitations, protruding eyeball, hot moist palms, may even have diarrhoea, weight loss and an increased appetite and can have a goiter (patients usually have several, if not all, of these features).

      But I don't know of hyperthyroidism increasing the person's susceptibility to infection, or delaying recovery from infection, as you seem to be worried in the case of your son.

      For treatment, the physician will perhaps start with methimazole (or carbimazole), and if it causes jaundice or increases vulnerability to infection, propylthiouracil (PTU). (Propranolol may have to be added if symptoms like palpitation, sweating are creating major trouble.)

      So this drug (carbimazole / methimazole / PTU) will be administered for about 8 - 12 weeks with regular assessment of hormone levels. When the hormone levels are back to normal, the drug may be continued at a lower maintenance dose for another 18 months if it is Grave's disease.

      If it is toxic multinodular goiter or solitary toxic adenoma, the physician may, after normalising the hormone levels, opt for radiotherapy. Radiotherapy can be given by external beam radiation, or by ingesting drugs containing radioactive iodine that will selectively exert its action on the thyroid gland.

      Surgery would be needed only if the patient has an enlarged thyroid gland which is compressing on the trachea or oesophagus, or is simply looking odd. Otherwise, drugs and radiation will suffice.

      Side-effects of treatment mainly involve too much suppression of the thyroid so that the patient becomes hypothyroid. In that case, the physician may prescribe hormone supplementation.

      Addressing your worries about your son gaining too much weight afterwards, I don't think that is a possibility (unless he unfortunately becomes hypothyroid due to treatment and then hormone supplementation is not given). So, there is not much for you to worry about his flu, or about gaining weight.

      But I didn't understand why you said "fighting a losing battle". Perhaps you could clarify.

      In any case, wish you be well.

  6. QUESTION:
    What does it mean to have mildly hyperactive thyroid?
    My doctor told me that my thyroid function is slightly elevated by 0.01. What does that mean?

    • ANSWER:
      Well, mildly is better than really active. I have the opposite one, hypo.
      You want to keep that in control.
      What causes hyperthyroidism?
      The most common cause (in more than 70% of people) is overproduction of thyroid hormone by the entire thyroid gland.
      What are the symptoms of hyperthyroidism?
      Thyroid hormone generally controls the pace of all of the processes in the body. This pace is called your metabolism. If there is too much thyroid hormone, every function of the body tends to speed up. It is not surprising then that some of the symptoms of hyperthyroidism are nervousness, irritability, increased perspiration, heart racing, hand tremors, anxiety, difficulty sleeping, thinning of your skin, fine brittle hair, and muscular weakness—especially in the upper arms and thighs. You may have more frequent bowel movements, but diarrhea is uncommon. You may lose weight despite a good appetite and, for women, menstrual flow may lighten and menstrual periods may occur less often.

      Hyperthyroidism usually begins slowly. At first, the symptoms may be mistaken for simple nervousness due to stress. If you have been trying to lose weight by dieting, you may be pleased with your success until the hyperthyroidism, which has quickened the weight loss, causes other problems.

      In Graves’ disease, which is the most common form of hyperthyroidism, the eyes may look enlarged because the upper lids are elevated. Sometimes, one or both eyes may bulge. Some patients have swelling of the front of the neck from an enlarged thyroid gland (a goiter).

  7. QUESTION:
    What does your thyroid have to do with body hair?
    I was reading a question, and someone had answered that your thyroid is responsible for hair on your body. What is a thyroid and what exactly does it do? What are its responsibilities in females?

    • ANSWER:
      You need your thyroid for the hormones it produces. The thyroid—a butterfly-shaped gland in the front of your neck—makes hormones that control the way your body uses energy. Your thyroid controls your metabolism, which is how your body turns food into energy, and also affects your heart, muscles, bones and cholesterol.

      While thyroid disorders can range from a small, harmless goiter (enlarged gland) to life-threatening cancer, the most common thyroid problems involve an abnormal production of thyroid hormones. Too much of these vital body chemicals results in a condition known as hyperthyroidism. Too little hormone production leads to hypothyroidism.

      Hyperthyroidism happens when the thyroid becomes overactive and produces too much of its hormones. People with hyperthyroidism have problems that reflect overactivity of the organs of the body, resulting in symptoms such as sweating, feeling hot, rapid heartbeats, weight loss, HAIR LOSS, and sometimes eye problems.

      Unlike hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism stems from an underproduction of thyroid hormones. Since your body's energy production requires certain amounts of thyroid hormones, a drop in hormone production leads to lower energy levels, causing you to feel weak and tired. Hypothyroidism will also cause HAIR LOSS.

      Pretty much, if your thyroid produces too much or too little of the T3 hormone... then you will suffer the effects of hair loss.

      If you need more information regarding thyroids (what they do and how they contribute to hair loss)... then check out a few of these links.
      http://www.oprah.com/slideshow/health/wellnessandprevention/slideshow1_ss_soh_200803/1
      http://www.wilsonssyndrome.com/ThyroidAndHairLoss.htm
      http://www.thyroid.ca/Articles/EngE9B.html
      http://www.zrtlab.com/Page.aspx?nid=20
      http://symptoms.wrongdiagnosis.com/cosymptoms/reduced-body-hair/thyroid-problems.htm

  8. QUESTION:
    What is thyroid disease in childen around one year to two years old?
    This one year old's soft spot has not healed over and he has some dry skin problems and a small loss of weight. This is some signs of thyroid disease. Hopefully it will turn out to be just a coincidence.

    • ANSWER:
      I would assume this child has been tested for thyroid disease. In the US, mandatory thyroid testing of infants has taken place since 1976. If this child has not been tested, then get him to a doctor as soon as possible. He may have congenital hypothyroidism. Even if he had been tested, it may be a good idea to test again. Hypothyroidism in a child can be devastating.

      Congenital hypothyroidism is a disorder that affects infants at birth, and occurs in about 1 in 4000 live-born babies. It is characterised by the loss of thyroid function, due to the thyroid gland failing to develop normally. In some cases, the gland is totally absent. About 10 per cent of cases are caused by an enzyme defect leading to deficient hormone production, iodine deficiency and a brain pituitary gland abnormality. If the diagnosis is delayed, and immediate treatment is not given, congenital hypothyroidism can lead to growth and developmental defects, and severe mental retardation (cretinism).

      Fortunately, routine testing for thyroid function in newborns has been mandatory since 1976. Within the first week of life, a heelprick blood sample is taken to assess an infant's thyroid hormone level. If any abnormality is found, a repeat blood sample is taken. If this confirms congenital hypothyroidism, the infant is immediately given thyroid hormone replacement therapy (T4 — thyroxine). Normal growth and development should then continue, with no adverse effects on the child's mental capacity.

      Before newborn thyroid screening began, this condition was easily missed. Even within a few days, subtle symptoms would emerge, such as poor feeding, constipation, low body temperature, cool skin, slow pulse, prolonged jaundice, increased sleepiness, and decreased crying. After a few weeks, other physical signs would become more noticeable, such as poor growth and development, dry skin and hair, poor muscle tone, slow tendon reflexes, hoarse crying, enlarged tongue, umbilical hernia, and puffiness or swelling. By this time, there would already have been some devastating consequences. Treatment with thyroid hormone replacement would have resolved most of the physical symptoms, but the child would more than likely have had permanent brain damage.

  9. QUESTION:
    What would cause a cat to stagger and lose its balance?
    Our 14 year old cat recently started falling over when he walks. He keeps his head slightly twisted to one side. His right pupil is enlarged and we're not sure if he can see out of that eye any more. His symptoms came on suddenly. He doesn't seem to be in pain but meows loudly when he wants food. He is eating normally. In fact, he seems to be eating more than usual but is losing weight. His vet doesn't know what is wrong with him. Our cat was on antibiotics for three weeks in case it was an inner ear infection that was affecting his balance, but his condition didn't change. He was tested for diabetes but was negative.

    • ANSWER:
      The combination of acute symptoms he is exhibiting is suggestive of a cardiovascular disease, cancer, or infection (in that order). I would have a retinal exam done (most vets have the equipment to do it) to check for retinal detachment and hemorrhage, which would suggest hypertension. Hypertension can be a result of cardiomyopathy, kidney disease, and thyroid problems. It can lead to blindness and stroke like symptoms. Does your cat have a rapid heartbeat or heart murmur? Did he have his blood pressure checked? Was his thyroid (T4) checked? His ravenous appetite and concomitant weight loss with normal blood sugar is suggestive of hyperthyroid related disease. Sometimes the T4 is normal and backup tests (free T4 or T3 suppression tests) are necessary for diagnosis. Brain tumors aren't real common in cats and tend to come on slowly. Infections such as F.I.P., FeLV, and F.I.V. can cause neurologic signs but require exposure to other cats. You may want to get a second opinion asking the vet to specifically check the above issues.

  10. QUESTION:
    What can happen if your Thyroid levels are high?
    What can happen if my thyroid levels are continuing to high. The doctor did not tell .

    • ANSWER:
      It is called Hyperthyroidism or overactive thyroid
      It occurs when your thyroid gland produces too much of the hormone thyroxine. Since this hormone controls the body's metabolism rate, hyperthyroidism can affect every organ in the body. Symptoms occur both when your thyroid is overproducing the hormone or when you take too much thyroxine in tablet form.
      1. Weight loss is common with hyperthyroidism, even if you are eating more than usual. Appetite may be decreased
      2. Hyperthyroidism can cause a rapid heart rate (often more than 100 beats a minute), palpitations (a feeling of pounding in the chest) and irregular heart beat. It also can cause feelings of anxiety, irritability and nervousness.
      3. Increased perspiration and sensitivity to heat are indications of too much thyroid hormone
      4. Graves' disease, the most common form of hyperthyroidism, can cause protruding eyeballs, discomfort and redness of the eyes, or sensitivity to light.
      5. A swelling at the base of your neck may indicate an enlarged thyroid.
      6. Other symptoms:
      A lighter menstrual flow, more frequent bowel movements, tremor in the hands or fingers, muscular weakness, thinning skin and fine, brittle hair are all symptoms of excess thyroid hormone. A hyperthyroid patient may feel fatigued, yet have trouble sleeping

  11. QUESTION:
    My grandmother is 95 years old and is producing to much calcium which is causing dehydration?
    What could be causing the excessive calcium?

    • ANSWER:
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      Hyperparathyroidism Index
      Glossary
      Find a Local Doctor

      Hyperparathyroidism
      View the Hyperthyroidism Slideshow Pictures
      Hyperthyroidism Slideshow Pictures Hyperthyroidism Slideshow Pictures
      Thyroid Symptoms and Solutions Slideshow Pictures Thyroid Symptoms and Solutions

      Introduction to hyperparathyroidism
      What are the parathyroid glands?
      What is hyperparathyroidism?
      Why are calcium and phosphorous so important?
      What causes hyperparathyroidism?
      How common is hyperparathyroidism?
      What are the symptoms of hyperparathyroidism?
      How is hyperparathyroidism diagnosed?
      How is hyperparathyroidism treated?
      Are there any complications associated with parathyroid surgery?
      Are parathyroid imaging tests needed before surgery?
      Which doctors specialize in treating hyperparathyroidism?
      Patient Discussions: Hyperparathyroidism
      Patient Discussions: Hyperparathyroidism
      Find a local Endocrinologist in your town

      Introduction

      Primary hyperparathyroidism is a disorder of the parathyroid glands, also called parathyroids. "Primary" means this disorder originates in the parathyroids: One or more enlarged, overactive parathyroid glands secretes too much parathyroid hormone (PTH). In secondary hyperparathyroidism, a problem such as kidney failure causes the parathyroids to be overactive. This publication focuses on primary hyperparathyroidism.

      What are the parathyroid glands?

      The parathyroid glands are four pea-sized glands located on the thyroid gland in the neck. Occasionally, a person is born with one or more of the parathyroid glands embedded in the thyroid, in the thymus, or located elsewhere around this area. In most such cases, however, the glands function normally.

      Though their names are similar, the thyroid and parathyroid glands are entirely different glands, each producing distinct hormones with specific functions. The parathyroid glands secrete PTH, a substance that helps maintain the correct balance of calcium and phosphorus in the body. PTH regulates the level of calcium in the blood, release of calcium from bone, absorption of calcium in the intestine, and excretion of calcium in the urine.

      When the level of calcium in the blood falls too low, the parathyroid glands secrete just enough PTH to restore the blood calcium level.

      Picture of the Parathyroid Glands

      What is hyperparathyroidism?

      If the parathyroid glands secrete too much hormone, as happens in primary hyperparathyroidism, the balance is disrupted: Blood calcium rises. This condition of excessive calcium in the blood, called hypercalcemia, is what usually signals the doctor that something may be wrong with the parathyroid glands. In 85 percent of people with primary hyperparathyroidism, a benign tumor called an adenoma has formed on one of the parathyroid glands, causing it to become overactive. Benign tumors are noncancerous. In most other cases, the excess hormone comes from two or more enlarged parathyroid glands, a condition called hyperplasia. Very rarely, hyperparathyroidism is caused by cancer of a parathyroid gland.

      This excess PTH triggers the release of too much calcium into the bloodstream. The bones may lose calcium, and too much calcium may be absorbed from food. The levels of calcium may increase in the urine, causing kidney stones.

      Much, much more at the site below.

  12. QUESTION:
    should i be concerned about the enlarged pituitary gland?
    I have bad headaches/migraines, nausea, fatigue, loss of appetite, a temperature, cold hands and feet and a rash on my arm (which has been there for 2 weeks no improvement, but disappears when pressed with glass)
    Should i be concerned about these symptoms? I have an enlarged pituitary gland in my brain (possibly a pituitary tumour, but I haven't been to my check ups because i moved across the country) is it possible that these symptoms are being caused by this? My neurologist wasn't very helpful on the matter.

    • ANSWER:
      The pituitary gland controls your thyroid hormones and if that is out of sync it will give the symptoms you have, go back to doctor and get your thyroid checked out. I had same symptoms and was diagnosed with under-active thyroid and now take medication to control it.
      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/enlarged-pituitary-gland.html

  13. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of a thyroid problem?
    I've already asked a thyroid question, but the only answer i got was that i didn't list enough symptoms. My mother wants me to get checked out by a doctor and i would like to know if i have any symptoms i didn't know was associated with a thyroid problem. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold and/or heat, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.

      The physical examination often reveals the hair to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight, but may also be underweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow even though the patient is not a well-trained athlete.

      If the average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit, then the diagnosis of a low functioning thyroid system is likely. An average temperature above 98.2 is considered high and might reflect a hyperthyroid condition.

      Need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH should be .3 – 3 but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse ...OR Graves Disease (hypER).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. May have to go to more than one before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  14. QUESTION:
    What types of thyroid conditions can cause weight gain and hair loss?
    And is there anyway to check it without going to the doctor. I imagine there isn't, but I figure it doesn't hurt to ask.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, Witty. There are two primary kinds of thyroid disease relevant to weight gain and hair loss, hyperthyroidism, (overactive), and hypothyroidism, (underactive). Both conditions are mostly found in women and are a major cause of hair loss.

      Hyperthyroidism is a condition that overly produces thyroid hormone by an enlarged thyroid gland, which diffuses hair loss. The most common cause of hyperthyroidism is called Graves' disease, an autoimmune condition resulting in over producing thyroid hormone by an enlarged gland. Women between their twenties and thirties are mostly infected with hyperthyroidism.

      Hypothyroidism is a condition that doesn't produce enough thyroid hormone. The most common cause of hypothyroidism is called Hashimoto's disease, antibodies that attacks the thyroid causing destruction towards the thyroid hormone production.

      Some symptoms of hyperthyroidism are weight gain or loss, excessive perspiring, fatigue, leg swelling, emotional changes and oily skin.

      Symptoms of hypothyroidism include weight gain, depression, the swelling of eyelids, hands and feet, muscle aches and dry skin.

      Studies have shown that millions of Americans have been affected with a thyroid disease. Hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism are autoimmune thyroid diseases, and if you have one autoimmune disease you can easily increase the risk of attracting another autoimmune disease.

      It's nothing to fool around with, so I would bite the bullet and get checked out by a doctor.

  15. QUESTION:
    Have hypothyroidism and havent taken meds in over a year and symptoms are getting worse, should i be worried?
    I am 20 yrs old and was diagnosed with hypothyroidism at 16. I haven't taken meds in over a year gut did take some for a few days bout 2 weeks ago. For the past 2 weeks I've been having neck pains and I felt my neck and my thyroid is slightly enlarge. I also have been sleeping bout ten to twelve he's a night but every day I feel like I barely slept. Is the hypothyrodism anything to worry about or is this prob nothing?

    • ANSWER:
      I became hypothyroid at age 14 as a result of cancer treatments. During the treatment they put me on a steroid and I gained A LOT of weight, which I think heavily contributed to the hypothyroidism. I'm at a normal weight now and I need almost no medication at this time. Before I was put on meds, it was severely interrupting my ability to cope with daily life. I couldn't sleep, but once I fell asleep sometimes needed 15-20 hours of sleep. It also caused me to gain more weight, which I've thankfully lost now. Basically in order for crucial parts of your body to function properly, your thyroid needs to be working. It won't kill you if you don't take the medication, but it will continue to make you more and more miserable. Maybe your health insurance can't cover your thyroid medication. In that case, there are some natural methods that have been proven to boost thyroid function. There should be a holistic health practitioner working at your local health food store who can discuss this with you. However, if you can afford the medication please take it. It is just thyroid hormone, it will not harm your body in any way. I promise. And I usually am against most prescription drugs, but thioridazine and synthroid have no long term adverse side effects reported as far as I know.

  16. QUESTION:
    Why would my dad be gaining weight when he has swollen lymph nodes in 4 different areas?
    My dad has hurthle cell carcinoma(thyroid cancer). He has been gaining weight over the last few months. But he also has been having lymph nodes that have been swollen or enlarged. He has had no fever, night sweats, or weight loss. But he does have some of the symptoms of lymphoma. He also has fluid on the lungs, copd, a trach from the tumor, emphysema, lots of breathing problems... Thank you for your advice or any knowledge you have on these issues.

    • ANSWER:
      There are a couple reasons that your dad might be gaining weight. These two are the most common, but only his doctor can say for sure, so he should see him/her as soon as possible.

      First is fluid retention throughout the body caused by the same mechanism that causes the fluid to build up in the lungs. Are his legs swollen? When you push on the skin (firmly) does it leave a "pit" or depression behind? If so, then he may need to be on a diuretic (helps to remove excess fluid) and to restrict salt in his diet.

      The second reason is that his thyroid may be badly underactive from the destruction caused by the cancer or the treatment he has undergone. A simple blood test will show whether this is the case. Make sure that his doc tests for all three thyroid hormones: T3, T4, and TSH.

      In any case, he should get to the doctor as soon as possible.

  17. QUESTION:
    Enlarged spleen, thyroid nodules, swollen lymph nodes in neck?
    I just found out that my spleen is swollen, and that is what is causing the pain in my upper left abdomen. I've had thyroid nodules for years, but recently they are much larger, and the nodes near them are swollen now. I am waiting for results of CBC, Hepatic Panel, and mono spot, and have a thyroid ultra-sound scheduled for tonight. Does anyone else have similar symptoms? What could be causing all this?

    • ANSWER:
      First off, you have ALL the classic signs and symptoms of Mono, so I'm glad they are doing a mono spot!

      Enlarge spleen is a condition that normally happens when you have mono due to the fact its a 'filtering' organ and trying to remove the infection. Same with the enlarged lymph nodes in your neck. I'm curious to know if you have a sore throat or have been weak for the last couple of days!

      As for thyroid nodules, experts know that thyroid nodules run in families. This means you are more likely to have a thyroid nodule if one of your parents has had a thyroid nodule. Or they can form when a person has been exposed to to much radiation.

      Hope this helps!

  18. QUESTION:
    What are the effects of have a hypothyroid?
    My latest test results show me having a 16.3 level when the norm for my age is 5.0-7.0. Recently i missed a period...i am two 2 1/2 weeks late and have taken 5 HPT test and they are negative and a blood test which also came back negative...i have some symptoms of pregnancy and i wanted to know if the thyroid has anything to do with me missing my cycle...thanks.
    I was diagnosed in 2004 and have been on and off the meds since then but this is the first time that it might have made me miss my period.

    • ANSWER:
      FYI;
      The thyroid is a small gland located below the skin and muscles at the front of the neck, just at the spot where a bow tie would rest. It's brownish red, with left and right halves (called lobes) that look like a butterfly's wings. It's light like a butterfly, too, and usually weighs less than an ounce.

      As small as it is, though, the thyroid has an enormously important job to do, especially for teens. It manufactures the hormones that help control metabolism and growth. To do its job, the thyroid needs a chemical element called iodine that the body absorbs from the foods you eat and the water you drink. The entire body contains about 50 milligrams of iodine. About 1/5 to 1/3 of that supply (10 to 15 milligrams) is stored in your thyroid. The thyroid combines the iodine with tyrosine (an essential amino acid) to make important hormones.

      Thyroid hormones are released from the gland and travel through the bloodstream to your body's cells. They help control the growth and the structure of bones, sexual development (puberty), and many other body functions. By helping your cells convert oxygen and calories into the energy they need to work properly, these hormones are important in determining if your body will mature as it should. Thyroid hormones also directly affect how most of your organs function. So if your thyroid isn't operating properly, you can have problems in lots of other parts of your body.

      What Is Thyroid Disease?
      Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland doesn't supply the proper amount of hormones needed by the body. If the thyroid is overactive, it releases too much thyroid hormone into the bloodstream, resulting in hyperthyroidism. ("Hyper" is from the Greek, meaning "over" or "above.") Hyperthyroidism causes the body to use up energy more quickly than it should, and chemical activity (like metabolism) in the cells speeds up.

      An underactive thyroid produces too little thyroid hormone, resulting in hypothyroidism. ("Hypo" means "under" or "below.") When the amount of hormone released into the bloodstream is below normal, the body uses up energy more slowly, and chemical activity (metabolism) in the cells slows down.

      Although they are two different conditions, in both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism the thyroid can become larger than normal. An enlarged thyroid gland is a lump that can be felt under the skin at the front of the neck. When it is large enough to see easily, it's called a goiter. People who don't get enough iodine in their diets also can get an enlarged thyroid, but this is rare in the United States because foods here usually supply enough iodine.

      Hyperthyroidism
      Hyperthyroidism can cause nervousness, irritability, increased perspiration, intolerance to heat, fatigue, difficulty sleeping, a fast heartbeat, irregular menstrual periods in girls, and muscle weakness. People with this problem might lose weight even though they're eating more than usual. The eyes may feel irritated or look like they're staring. Sometimes the tissues around the eyes become inflamed and swollen, and the eyes appear to bulge out, but this is less common in teens than in adults with hyperthyroidism.

      Graves disease, an autoimmune disease, is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. The condition makes a person's immune system produce abnormal types of antibodies (normally antibodies help the body fight infection). These abnormal antibodies make the thyroid gland produce more thyroid hormones. Eventually, the thyroid gland enlarges, which can result in a goiter. For reasons that doctors don't yet understand, autoimmune thyroid diseases like Graves disease are much more common in women and are most likely to occur in teens and young and middle-aged adults.

      Doctors usually diagnose Graves disease based on a person's symptoms, a physical examination, and blood tests that show high levels of thyroid hormone in the blood.

      Once the diagnosis is made, a teen with Graves disease will usually start taking an anti-thyroid medication, such as propylthiouracil or methimazole, which blocks the thyroid's production of thyroid hormones. Medication usually brings the hormone levels down to the normal range in 1 to 2 months.

      However, in most cases, the disease doesn't go away. Some people continue taking medication for months or years to keep Graves disease under control, but it can be a hassle to take medication 1 to 3 times a day for a long period. So many doctors recommend a permanent treatment.

      Radioactive iodine (RAI) is the most commonly recommended permanent treatment for teens with Graves disease today. It is usually given at a hospital, but doesn't require a hospital stay. RAI is considered safe for teens when given in the standard amount. It is taken in capsules or mixed with a glass of water. The thyroid gland quickly absorbs the RAI from the bloodstream and, within a few months, the gland shrinks and symptoms gradually disappear. RAI has been used to treat Graves disease successfully for more than 50 years.

      The other permanent treatment for Graves disease is surgery to remove most of the thyroid gland (thyroidectomy). The operation is performed in a hospital under general anesthesia, meaning the person is asleep and feels nothing during the surgery. A small incision (cut) in the lower central part of the neck usually leaves a thin scar. After surgery, there typically is swelling in the area of the incision. People sometimes have a sore throat and some trouble swallowing following surgery, although they should be able to eat and drink normally. These symptoms usually disappear within a few days.

      After treatment for hyperthyroidism, hormone production often slows down to hypothyroid (underactive) levels, so the person needs to take a thyroid hormone replacement tablet each day. This treatment is a lot easier to manage than taking pills to control the hyperthyroidism - fewer blood tests, doctor visits, and medication adjustments are necessary.

      As the body adjusts to the hormone replacement tablets, a doctor may increase or reduce the dosage until the levels of thyroid hormone in a person's blood are normal. Once the doctor finds the proper dosage, people usually feel well and free of symptoms. However, the doctor will continue to check hormone levels to make sure the dosage is right, especially for growing teens whose levels might change over just a few months.

      Hypothyroidism
      A person with mild hypothyroidism may feel just fine - in fact, the condition might cause no symptoms at all. However, symptoms can become more obvious if hypothyroidism progresses.

      People with underactive thyroids might feel depressed and sluggish. They might gain weight, even though they're not eating more or getting less exercise than usual. Teens with hypothyroidism also might have slow growth in height, slow sexual development, irregular menstrual periods in girls, muscle weakness, dry skin, hair loss, poor memory, and difficulty concentrating.

      Hashimoto's thyroiditis (pronounced: hah-she-moe-toes thy-roy-dye-tiss) is also an autoimmune disease and is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in teens. In this condition, the body's immune system attacks the cells in the thyroid gland, preventing it from producing enough thyroid hormone. The thyroid responds by working harder to make enough hormones. This can make it become enlarged and may result in a goiter.

      Hypothyroidism is usually easily diagnosed with a physical examination and blood tests, and treatment with thyroid hormone replacement pills can restore normal levels of thyroid hormone in the blood. This treatment is pretty simple, but it does require doctor visits once or twice a year for an examination, blood tests, and medication adjustments as needed.

      Goiters and Thyroid Nodules
      It can take months or years for a goiter to develop. In teens, goiters are usually caused by the autoimmune thyroid conditions discussed above, which might show no obvious symptoms until the goiter is visible as a swelling at the front of the neck. People with this problem might have the sensation that food is stuck in the throat, especially when they lie down or sleep on their backs.

      Generally, treatment of the thyroid disease causing the goiter will decrease or control the enlargement. If the thyroid continues to get larger despite treatment and becomes large enough to cause discomfort or a lump in the neck, surgery may be required. However, surgery is not necessary for most people.

      A thyroid nodule is a lump or enlarged area in the thyroid gland. Sometimes a nodule can appear in a healthy gland. It may feel like a lump in the throat, or there may be tenderness or pain in the front of the neck. If the nodule is large enough, it may be visible at the front of the neck.

      Most thyroid nodules are harmless. A nodule may simply be an overgrowth of normal thyroid tissue, a swelling caused by inflammation (such as in autoimmune thyroid diseases) or a collection of fluid called a cyst.

      The doctor usually discovers nodules by touch during a physical examination. If the doctor finds a nodule, blood tests might be needed to find out how the thyroid gland is working. A doctor may also take an ultrasound image of the gland to detect whether the nodule is a cyst or a solid growth or tumor. In addition to doing a physical examination, the doctor will ask you about any concerns and symptoms you have, your past health, your family's health, any medications you're taking, any allergies you may have, and other issues. This is called the medical history.

      Another test called a thyroid scan can tell the doctor what type of nodule a person has. For this test, a person swallows a pill containing a small amount of radioactive iodine or another radioactive substance. The thyroid absorbs the radioactive substance. Next, a special camera measures where the radioactive substance is taken up by the thyroid gland, giving the doctor a better picture of the location, size, and type of thyroid nodule.

      In addition, a fine needle biopsy may be done to help determine whether a nodule is cancerous. During the biopsy, the doctor inserts a thin needle through the skin into the thyroid nodule (the skin is numbed with medication first). Through the needle, the doctor takes a sample of tissue or some fluid from a cyst. The tissue or fluid is then sent to a lab to be examined. In some cases, a person might need to have the nodule surgically removed for more detailed examination in the lab. Fortunately, cancer is rare in children and teens, and most thyroid cancers can be cured or controlled with treatment.

      Thyroid Disease, Growth, and Puberty
      Once puberty starts, the body goes through some very noticeable changes. Because thyroid hormones play an important role in this process, thyroid disease may slow down or interfere with a teen's physical development. But it's important to know that not everyone grows or develops at the same age or at the same rate. If your friend seems to grow 4 inches overnight and you haven't had a growth spurt yet, it doesn't mean there's something wrong with you or your thyroid.

      A thyroid problem may also cause a girl to have changes in her periods. Girls with thyroid problems may have a decrease or increase in menstrual flow or there may be a shorter or longer time between periods than usual. However, because girls who are just starting to menstruate often have irregular periods for the first year or so, changes in periods are usually nothing to worry about and don't mean a person has thyroid disease.

      People who are concerned that they might have a thyroid problem should visit the doctor. Chances are, the problem is something simpler. And if a person does have thyroid disease, diagnosing and treating it properly - including bringing the blood levels of thyroid hormones back to normal - will usually prevent or correct any problems.

      Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
      Date reviewed: September 2006

  19. QUESTION:
    What are the chances this is something serious?
    I am a 14 y.o. girl and i have Hoshimoto's disease. ive been taking medication almost as long as i can remember for it and i go in for my annual checkup. today i went and she found a nodule on my thyroid and im freaked out..what if its serious and its cancer? what are the chances that it is?
    PS. a month ago i had an achy feeling in my throid and iver summer i play lacrosse and i got hit in the throat with the ball really hard.

    • ANSWER:
      Catching a lacrosse ball in the throat had to have hurt big time. I got hit with a lacrosse ball near the top of my thigh once. I was lame for days. I would have had to go to the doctor, but Dad was a sports trainer and knew what to do. It's likely the bruising to your thyroid has caused a small nodule.

      From the Mayo clinic.

      Complications
      By Mayo Clinic staff

      Left untreated, an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) caused by Hashimoto's disease can lead to a number of health problems:

      Goiter. Constant stimulation of your thyroid to release more hormones may cause the gland to become enlarged, a condition known as goiter. Hypothyroidism is one of the most common causes of goiter. Although generally not uncomfortable, a very large goiter can affect your appearance and may interfere with swallowing or breathing.
      Heart problems. Hashimoto's disease also may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, primarily because high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol — the "bad" cholesterol — can occur in people with an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism). If left untreated, hypothyroidism can lead to an enlarged heart and, in rare cases, heart failure.
      Mental health issues. Depression may occur early in Hashimoto's disease and may become more severe over time. Hashimoto's disease can also cause sexual desire (libido) to decrease in both men and women and can lead to slowed mental functioning.
      Myxedema (mik-suh-DEE-muh). This rare, life-threatening condition can develop due to long-term hypothyroidism as a result of untreated Hashimoto's disease. Its signs and symptoms include intense cold intolerance and drowsiness followed by profound lethargy and unconsciousness. A myxedema coma may be triggered by sedatives, infection or other stress on your body. Myxedema requires immediate emergency medical treatment.
      Birth defects. Babies born to women with untreated hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto's disease may have a higher risk of birth defects than do babies born to healthy mothers. Doctors have long known that these children are more prone to intellectual and developmental problems. There may be a link between hypothyroid pregnancies and birth defects, such as cleft palate. A connection also exists between hypothyroid pregnancies and heart, brain and kidney problems in infants. If you're planning to get pregnant or if you're in early pregnancy, be sure to have your thyroid level checked.

      Nowhere does it reference a link between Hashimoto's disease and thyroid cancer.

  20. QUESTION:
    What's the best alternative for Synthroid for Hypothryoidism?
    I've been hearing a lot of Thyrolar as a safer alternative for Synthroid. I've been having a lot of problems with hair falling out while using Synthroid and I'm only 20 years old. It's bad enough I have a thyroid issue, I don't need to be bald this early in my life. Has anyone else with Hypoactive Thyroidism found a better solution for treatment? What has worked best for you?

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Medicines works very well in both Hypothyroidism and Hyperthyroidism, below you will find the symptoms and the head remedies used in Homeopathy to treat Thyroid Disorders please read carefully and I would suggest you consult a good Homeopathic physician in your locality.

      Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the body lacks sufficient thyroid hormone. Since the main purpose of thyroid hormone is to "run the body's metabolism", it is understandable that people with this condition will have symptoms associated with a slow metabolism.

      Hypothyroidism - CAUSE
      There are two fairly common causes of hypothyroidism. The first is a result of previous (or currently ongoing) inflammation of the thyroid gland which leaves a large percentage of the cells of the thyroid damaged (or dead) and incapable of producing sufficient hormone. The most common cause of thyroid gland failure is called autoimmune thyroiditis (also called Hashimoto's thyroiditis), a form of thyroid inflammation caused by the patient's own immune system. The second major cause is the broad category of "medical treatments". As noted on a number of our other pages, the treatment of many thyroid conditions warrants surgical removal of a portion or all of the thyroid gland. If the total mass of thyroid producing cells left within the body are not enough to meet the needs of the body, the patient will develop hypothyroidism.

      Hypothyroidism - SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
      Fatigue
      Weakness
      Weight gain or increased difficulty losing weight
      Coarse, dry hair
      Dry, rough pale skin
      Hair loss
      Cold intolerance (can't tolerate the cold like those around you)
      Muscle cramps and frequent muscle aches
      Constipation
      Depression
      Irritability
      Memory loss
      Abnormal menstrual cycles
      Decreased libido

      Hypothyroidism - HOMEOPATHIC TREATMENT & Medicines
      Homeopathy offers good prognosis to cases of hypothyroidism. Medicines like Calcare phos, Calcarea carb, Lapis alb, Iodium, Thyroidinum, Spongia, Lycopus, Calcarea iod etc are often found indicated in cases of hypothyroidism.
      ______________________________________

      Hyperthyroidism is due to an excess amount of free thyroid hormone. There is a generalized increase in metabolic rate, with an increase in oxygen use.

      Hyperthyroidism - SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
      The symptoms of hyperthyroidism include heat intolerance, nervousness, increased irritability, palpitations, weight loss with the same or increased food intake, and increased frequency of defecation. Women may have a decreased frequency of menses. Physical findings may include hyperkinesis, warm moist skin, a prominent stare and lid lag. The neurological exam may show a fine tremor and a fast return phase for the deep tendon reflexes. The cardiac exam reveals signs associated with a high cardiac output, including tachycardia, although atrial fibrillation is also common, a prominent S4, and flow murmurs. The thyroid gland may be diffusely enlarged, nodular, or even normal in size. Signs and symptoms may range from very mild to severe. Laboratory tests almost always show a low TSH and a high T3. The total and free T4 are also usually increased.

      Hyperthyroidism - HOMEOPATHIC TREATMENT & Medicines
      Homeopathy offers good prognosis to cases of hyperthyroidism. Medicines like Calcare phos, Calcarea carb, Lapis alb, Iodium, Thyroidinum, Spongia, Lycopus, Calcarea iod etc are often found indicated in cases of hyperthyroidism.

      Best of Health to you.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  21. QUESTION:
    what are the symptoms of thyroid disease?
    how can one find out if she/he has thyroid disease?

    • ANSWER:
      Well here are some...............
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.

      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.

      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      For second question - you have to find a doctor that is knowledgeable about the thyroid...this is not easy.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      You need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  22. QUESTION:
    What were your hypothyroidism symptoms?
    I know what websites like Web MD and Mayo Clinic say about the typical symptoms, but I was wondering if anyone has any details about their specific process of experiencing symptoms & getting diagnosed?

    • ANSWER:
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.

      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.

      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      Have you had your thyroid tested? You need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  23. QUESTION:
    When and after I cry. My throat swells up and there is a big tight painfull ball that really bothers me?
    Also my thyroid glands are swelling up and down all the time, and sometimes my esophagus flap has a hard time opening and closing when I swallow, but not always. Whats going on.....? I also have aplastic anemia right now and my platelets are low. Don't know if its realted but added it just in case....

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of aplastic anemia
      Symptoms arise as the consequence of bone marrow failure.
      • Low red blood cell count (anemia) leads to fatigue and weakness.
      • Low white blood cell count (leukopenia) causes an increased risk of infection.
      • Low platelet count (Thrombocytopenia) results in bleeding, especially of mucus membranes and skin.
      The disease may be acute or chronic, and is almost always progressive. Risk factors are unknown.
      The following are the most common symptoms of aplastic anemia. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently (Fundamental of Homoeopathy Supported).
      Symptoms may include:
      • headache
      • dizziness
      • nausea
      • shortness of breath
      • bruising
      • lack of energy or tiring easily (fatigue)
      • abnormal paleness or lack of color of the skin
      • blood in stool
      • nosebleeds
      • bleeding gums
      • fevers
      • sinus tenderness
      • enlarged liver or spleen
      • oral thrush - white patches on a red, moist, swollen surface, occurring anywhere in the mouth.
      The symptoms of aplastic anemia may resemble other blood disorders or medical problems.

      TARGET THERAPY* for any incurable disease including cancer of any organ[s], post-surgical recurrence of tumors, HIV/AIDS, Thalassemia, Muscular Dystrophy, Autism, Tinnitus, Aplastic anemia, all brain & spinal cord disorders, etc., ---it should aim @ [3] steps.
      1. Removal of toxins from all internal organs & purging through Normal Drainage systems, feces, urine, menses[females], skin, lungs and vomiting.
      • 2. Activating all the internal organs to make each & every organ to function up to optimum levels.
      3. Supplying vitamins, nutrients, micro-nutrients, minerals, trace elements for invigorating the entire Immune system to produce antibodies.


      • Acupressure techniques & Indian Natural Remedies [comprising Ayurveda, Homeopathy, Bio-chemic salts, Herbal Remedies, Yoga/Meditation, Magneto-therapy, Sidha, etc.,] can meet all the requirements.
      • Acupressure Techniques—NO SIDE EFFECTS. NO HOSPITALIZATION. Costs Affordable even by the poor. An acupressure Therapeutist can, not only diagnose any disease instantaneously, but, also prevent/treat any disease & or the affected organ[s] with the aid of Indian natural remedies. All stipulated instructions must be followed most religiously. The % of success depends upon the extent of compliance.
      4. U may try acupressure techniques and natural remedies strictly for 45 days and If U find any perceivable improvements, U may continue it for another 45 days and so on to have total cure.

      PS:If satisfied/benefited with, U may inform others to browse ‘Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ by Dr.Devendra Vora, D.Sc.,M.D.,F.R.C.P.,---an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.

  24. QUESTION:
    How do you get breast cancer?
    Im just wondering for future reference, how do you get breast cancer? What are the signs and what causes it?

    • ANSWER:
      BREAST CANCER*:
      Signs and symptoms of breast cancer may include:
      •A breast lump or thickening that feels different from the surrounding tissue
      •Bloody discharge from the nipple
      •Change in the size or shape of a breast
      •Changes to the skin over the breast, such as dimpling
      •Inverted nipple
      •Peeling, scaling or flaking of the nipple or breast skin
      •Redness or pitting of the skin over your breast, like the skin of an orange

      Why breast cancer is prevalent amongst the youth?
      1.In the 'Bra and Breast Cancer Study' in the United States , It was discovered that women with breast cancer had a history of sporting tighter and longer bra-wearing than did the women who had not (yet) developed the disease. Wearing a bra whole day and while @ home. When a woman wears a tight bra, she subjects her breasts to pressure, closing off the lymphatic pathway from the breast to the nodes. This causes fluid built-up swelling, tenderness and cyst formation. Toxins must be flushed out via the lymphatic. However, a bra-constricted breast cannot adequately perform this cleansing process, resulting in toxin accumulation in the breast.

      2.Thyroid and parathyroid glands are the first victims in any type of cancer including breast cancer.
      3.Bad dietary habits- Obesity- McDonald’s Pizzas, Burgers, KFC’s deep-freezed & deep fried chicken, ghee, butter, chocolates, excessive consumption of rice, Calorific value of intake is more than output, etc.
      4.Stress, strain and tensions of modern life. A modern woman has to perform double duties, house wife as well as employment.
      5.Irregular menses.
      6.Sexual Promiscuity-vis-à-vis-HIV/AIDS,STDs—It is inevitable to indulge in the ‘indiscriminate consumption of birth control pills, steroids’ resulting in hormonal imbalance, irregular menses, heavy periods, amenorrhea----all symptoms induced by steroids.
      7.Non-indulgence in breast feeding by the modern mother in the name of losing her prettiness, good and aesthetic shapes.
      8.In terms of ‘Acupressure’the causes of cancer----a disturbed solar plexus, blocked energy in endocrine glands, gonads, brain & spinal cord, hormonal imbalance, irregular menses, bad dietary habits, chronic internal hemorrhages induced by drugs, loss of appetite, heavy loss of weight, anemia, chronic allergies, unhealed wounds/injuries, chronic infections, accumulation of toxins and heat in the internal organs, etc.

      Any lump or tumor in the breast should be suspected until proved benign. The growth is hard and adherent to the skin or deeper tissues, ulceration, nipple is retracted and auxiliary lymph nodes are enlarged. Tenderness is not uncommon.
      Different medications are available depending upon signs and symptoms.
      For example, left nipple is sunken, skin adherent. Ulceration discharging very offensive fluid. Auxiliary glands swollen hard and knotted. Lancinating pains in the tumor during night. For all these symptoms or at least a majority of them, the best remedy is Asterius rub 30 – dosage 4 globules t.d.s.

      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ by Dr.Devendra Vora, D.Sc.,M.D.,F.R.C.P.,---an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.
      Dr.Vora, the world renowned Acupressurist, an octogenarian and the Bhishma Pithamaha of acupressure in India--- treated and caused to treat more than 150000 cases of Cancer, HIV/AIDS, Diabetes, irregular menses and also many other most dreaded diseases---Dr.Devendra Vora has analyzed that pressure applied on certain points located on the palms and soles helps to stimulate all organs of the body, prevents disease and assists in maintaining good health. Acupressure also helps to diagnose, prevent and cure diseases like common cold, Diabetes, High Blood Pressure, Migraine, Paralysis, and even cancer, HIV/AIDS. Autism, Thalassemia, Muscular Dystrophy, all brain and spinal cord affected diseases.

  25. QUESTION:
    Sometimes when I breathe my whole body goes numb, and I have headaches a lot. What could be causing that?
    I get really light headed and my body tingles, like when your foot falls asleep. I find that when I breathe, it makes the numbness worse. I have pretty constant headaches, and these things have started to worry me. Any ideas of what could be causing it?

    • ANSWER:
      Those are unusual symptoms. You really need to go see the doctor about them. No one here can diagnose something like this.

      There are quite a few things that can help with the headache until you see the doctor. Lie quietly in a darkened room and try to relax. Massage can help. Drink some coffee - caffeine works very well for me. Take a warm relaxing bath. Take an appropriate over the counter pain medication. Use heat or cold, which makes you feel better. Drink water as some headaches are caused by dehydration. Rub a slice of lime on your forehead - it does help relieve the throbbing. Check here for more suggestions.

      http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-a-Headache

      Some of the possible causes of numbness include:

      Sitting or standing in a position for prolonged time
      Injury to a certain nerve can cause numbness in the body part of that nerve, or other parts connected with that nerve channel
      Shingles (herpes zoster) infection is another reason which can lead to numbness
      Pressure on the spinal nerves in condition like slip disk
      Pressure on the peripheral nerve which forms due to enlarged blood vessels, infection or tumors
      No blood supply to a certain body area, can also cause body numbness in the certain body part
      Body numbness at night or during sleep sensation gets worse in people having the peripheral neuropathy condition
      Medical condition of carpel tunel syndrome where a person gets a pressure on a nerve at the wrist, is a common experienced condition of body numbness during pregnancy
      Other medical condition like diabetes, multiple sclerosis, under active thyroid also lead to body numbness and tinglingnnel
      Lack of vitamin B12 in body is also another cause of body numbness
      Certain medications or radiation therapy can also lead to body numbness
      Experiencing right side or left side of body numbness can be a stroke symptom
      Nerve damage due to consumption of lead, tobacco or alcohol can also lead to body numbness and tingling sensation

      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/body-numbness.html

  26. QUESTION:
    A 37-year-old woman presents to her physician with an enlarged thyroid gland and high plasma levels of T4 and?
    A 37-year-old woman presents to her physician with an enlarged thyroid gland and high plasma levels of T4 and T3. Which of the following is likely to be decreased?

    A.Heart rate
    B.Cardiac output
    C.Peripheral vascular resistance
    D.Ventilation rate
    E.Metabolic rate

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid*Symptoms
      T3 Normal-RANGE 0.790-1.490 UNITS NG/ML
      T4 Normal- RANGE 4.5 - 12 UNITS UG/DL
      TSH Normal RANGE 0.45 - 4.7 UNITS uiU/ml.

      To arrive @ the root cause & to answer your question, U may edit Ur question with further details----------- constipation problems; if female menses irregularities, if sexually active consuming steroids [artificial hormones for birth control], depression, menses irregularities, anxiety neurosis, insomnia, some other disorder[s], etc.

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

  27. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms for thyroid cancer ?

    thanks all..

    cats ... can you tell me what are the other multitude symptoms your daughter had ?

    • ANSWER:
      There are different types of thyroid cancer (carcinoma of the thyroid), and the most common types (papillary carcinoma and follicular carcinoma) are highly curable if detected early. Up to 97% of these common types of thyroid cancer that occur in younger people are completely cured with appropriate treatment. Less common types, including medullary carcinoma and anaplastic carcinoma, tend to spread more rapidly and extensively than the other types and have a worse prognosis.

      Most commonly, thyroid cancers in the early stage produce no symptoms. As the cancer grows, a small lump or nodule can be felt in the neck. The vast majority of thyroid nodules are caused by benign conditions, but about one per cent of these lumps represent early stages of thyroid cancer. If the cancer spreads, it can cause symptoms that include:

      Problems with swallowing
      Hoarseness
      Enlarged lymph nodes in the neck
      Breathing difficulty
      Pain in the throat and/or neck
      Remember, 99% of nodules in the thyroid gland are benign, but only your doctor can determine if a lump in your neck is cancerous. Even the symptoms above can be caused by infections and other benign conditions. If you have a lump in the neck or have the above symptoms, you should visit your doctor to determine the cause of your symptoms.

  28. QUESTION:
    How do you get an increased workload as a cause of death?
    I'm being honest and trying to be specific in my life.
    I know the definition of enlarged heart, but I mean it, what makes you get that cause?

    • ANSWER:
      An enlarged heart can be caused by conditions that cause your heart to pump harder than usual or that damage your heart muscle. Sometimes the heart enlarges and becomes weak for unknown reasons (idiopathic).

      Conditions associated with an enlarged heart include:

      High blood pressure. Having high blood pressure can make it so that your heart has to pump harder to deliver blood to the rest of your body, enlarging and thickening the muscle.

      Heart valve disease. Four valves within your heart keep blood flowing in the right direction. If the valves are damaged by such conditions as rheumatic fever, a heart defect, infections (infectious endocarditis), connective tissue disorders, certain medications or radiation treatments for cancer, your heart may enlarge.

      Disease of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy). Cardiomyopathy is the thickening and stiffening of heart muscle. In early stages of cardiomyopathy, you may have no symptoms. As the condition worsens, your heart may enlarge to try to pump more blood to your body.

      Heart attack. Damage done during a heart attack may cause an enlarged heart.
      A heart condition you're born with (congenital heart defect). Many types of congenital heart defects may lead to an enlarged heart, as defects can affect blood flow through the heart, forcing it to pump harder.

      Abnormal heartbeat (arrhythmia). If you have an arrhythmia, your heart may not pump blood as effectively as it would if your heart rhythm were normal. The extra work your heart has to do to pump blood to your body may cause it to enlarge.

      High blood pressure in the artery connecting your heart and lungs (pulmonary hypertension). If you have pulmonary hypertension, your heart may need to pump harder to move blood between your lungs and your heart. As a result, the right side of your heart may enlarge.

      Low red blood cell count (anemia). Anemia is a condition in which there aren't enough healthy red blood cells to carry adequate oxygen to your tissues. Left untreated, chronic anemia can lead to a rapid or irregular heartbeat. Your heart must pump more blood to make up for the lack of oxygen in the blood when you're anemic. Rarely, your heart can enlarge if you have anemia for a long time and you don't seek treatment.

      Thyroid disorders. Both an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) and an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism) can lead to heart problems, including an enlarged heart.

      Excessive iron in the body (hemochromatosis). Hemochromatosis is a disorder in which your body doesn't properly metabolize iron, causing it to build up in various organs, including your heart muscle. This can cause an enlarged left ventricle due to weakening of the heart muscle.

      Rare diseases that can affect your heart, such as amyloidosis. Amyloidosis is a condition in which abnormal proteins circulate in the blood and may be deposited in the heart, interfering with your heart's function. If amyloid builds up in your heart, it can cause it to enlarge.

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/enlarged-heart/DS01129/DSECTION=causes

  29. QUESTION:
    What is thyroid ? What are the symptoms ? If untreated could it yield to enlarge of the heart or heart attack?
    Six years ago, I was diagnosed to have toxic thyroid. My doctor gave me medicine and when my thyroid is in normal level, my doctor recommend a radioactive treatment. But I never undergo a radioactive treatment. Just this afternoon, I happen to met a long highschool friend who is now a successful doctor. He told me to have a medical check up immediately because my heart might start to enlarge due to non treatment of thyroid. Is there any doctor out there who can share us ?

    • ANSWER:
      The thyroid is the gland found in front of your throat or trachea. It produces hormones that are necessary for metabolism of your body. Your thyroid can be hyperfunctioning (hyperthyroid) meaning it produces more than what is needed, hypofuntioning (hypothyroid) when it produces less than what hormon is needed or it can be euthyroid, it means you have enough. there is also a small gland located in the brain that stimulates or control your thyroid, so even if basically your thyroid is ok, if the pituitary gland is abnormal, it can cause your thyroid to either produce more or produce less hormones. The more hormones it produce, the larger the gland gets.
      You had toxic thyroid, it means thay you have a hyperfunctioning gland. the problem with this is that the hormones produced cause faster metabolism, therefore you can have increased heart rate, increase metabolism of the body so weight loss, poor tolerance to heat and cold, tremors, etc. eye problems can also manifest, like proptosis or protruberance of the eyeballs.
      You have to have your hormone levels check to see if its normal, whether you need supplements or anti-thyroid hormones. Your heart enlarges because the greater/faster metabolism exerts a higher toll in your body, increase HR, so the muscles in the heart are overdeveloped (just like when you do weight lifting, if you keep exercising the muscle, it grows bigger!)

  30. QUESTION:
    how can i make my legs and tighs slimmer without liposuction and exercise that causing muscles?
    how can i make my legs and tighs slimmer without liposuction and exercise that causing muscles on legs and tighs....i did walking but my muscles on my legs getting bigger...

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Remedies for Obesity - Corpulence and Fatness (Without any side effects or Complications) :-

      OBESITY(Corpulence) along with :-

      Tongue thickly white coated; patient feels exhausted in warm water Antim Crud 200, 6 hourly

      With unusual tallness in children; chilly patient Silicea 30X or 30, 4 hourly

      When the tongue is constantly whitish coated; with liver disorders Kali Mur 30 or 6X, 4 hourly

      Fat, flabby and chilly patients. Profuse sweat on hand; worse at night, by exertion; easily fatigued; feet are cold and damp; craving for eggs; sensitive to cold and damp climate Calcarea Carb 200, 4 hourly

      Especially for fatty women approaching menopause; sensitive to cold weather; liver and spleen enlarged Calcarea Ars 200, 6 hourly

      Obese patient who suffers from constipation; flatulence; goitre or thyroid enlargements Fucus Ves Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 10 -20 drops in a sip of warm water

      Intercurrent remedy; specially when obesity is due to thyroid disturbances Thyroidinum 200 or 1M, once weekly (3 Doses)

      Obese,chilly, constipated patients, specially in women when there is a history of delayed menstruation; prone to skin ailments; feels cold; easily chilled and easily overheated Graphites 200 or 1M, once weekly (6 Doses)

      For fatty women; feels completely exhausted;(whether they do anything or not) Lac Def 200 weekly (6 Doses)

      To reduce weight(flesh and fat); to make the muscles hard and firm Calotropis 30 or 200, 6 hourly

      To absorb abnormal tissues; new growths and fat Phytolacca berry Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly,10 drops in a sip of warm water. (also available in tablet form)

      Obese patient with weak heart; sensitive to cold; aversion to water; habits of uncleanliness; prone to colds Ammon Carb 200, 6 hourly

      FATNESS along with :-

      With excessive appetite; obesity after abdominal operation; craving for eggs; chilly patient Calcarea Carb 200 or 1M, once weekly (6 Doses)

      If Calcarea carb fails; specific for persons suffering from goitre Fucus Ves Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 20 - 30 drops in a sip of warm water.

      Accompanied with unhealthy skin. Obesity during menopause; stools constipated Graphites 200, 6 hourly

      In shy and emotional weepy individuals; loss of thirst; feels better in open air Pulsatilla 200, 6 hourly.

      When due to malfunctioning of thyroid gland Thyroidinum 200 or 1M, once fortnightly (6 Doses)

      To reduce fats from the body (also available in tablet form) Phytolacca berry Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 10 - 15 drops in a sip of warm water.

      Obesity with flesh decreases, muscles become harder and firmer Calotropis 30 or 200 6 hourly

      Fatness; more around buttocks and thighs Ammonium Mur 200, 6 hourly

      Fatness; due to gastric complaints; constipations; tongue thickly whitish coated as if white washed Antim Crud 200, 6 hourly.
      ______________________________________

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge.
      Curing without any side effects or Complications Thats the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  31. QUESTION:
    What's the difference between the diseases myxedema and cretinism?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Hannah.

      MYXEDEMA

      Myxedema coma is a loss of brain function as a result of severe, longstanding low level of thyroid hormone in the blood (hypothyroidism). Myxedema coma is considered a life-threatening complication of hypothyroidism and represents the far more serious side of the spectrum of thyroid disease.

      WHO IS AFFECTED BY MYXEDEMA COMA

      Myxedema coma is not common, but tends to be seen more frequently in elderly patients and in women. There is an increased incidence in the winter months, which is likely secondary to the extremes in temperature. Myxedema coma can actually result in death. Fortunately, the condition is rare.

      SYMPTOMS OF HYPOTHYROIDISM

      Before a patient develops myxedema coma, features of hypothyroidism are usually present and may have gone unsuspected for a long period of time.

      These symptoms include:
      • fatigue,
      • lethargy,
      • mental impairment,
      • depression,
      • cold intolerance,
      • hoarseness,
      • dry skin,
      • weight gain,
      • change in menstrual cycles,
      • constipation, and
      • headaches.

      CRETINISM

      Cretinism is a medical condition caused by an untreated congenital thyroid hormone deficiency. This result of hypothyroidism leads to mildly to extremely stunted growth, both mentally and physically.

      Cretinism may be said to be either endemic, genetic or sporadic. A main cause, especially in endemic cases, is iodine deficiency, which may be traced back to the diet. Along with cretinism, an iodine deficiency may lead to goiter, which is an enlarged thyroid gland.

      SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF CRETINISM

      • Abdomen which sticks out
      • Delayed bone maturation
      • Delayed puberty
      • Infertility
      • Neurological impairment
      • Ovulation interference
      • Poor growth (height)
      • Thickened skin

      Take Care. Regards.

  32. QUESTION:
    How to treat and what is Hyperthyroidism?
    .I was wondering what can happen if I don't get this treated? I've had it for a long time. It runs in my family.
    My conditions are that I never gain weight, I eat all the time, my heart beats faster when I'm sitting down. I'm also underweight.
    Are there anyone out there that has this treated or have this? What can I do to get it treated?
    Also what is it?
    Thanks for all you answers.

    • ANSWER:
      Definition

      Hyperthyroidism is a condition caused by an overactive thyroid gland. The gland makes too much T4 and T3 hormones. Hormones are substances that affect and control many important functions in the body.

      Alternative Names
      Thyrotoxicosis; Overactive thyroid

      Causes, incidence, and risk factors

      The thyroid gland is located in the neck. It produces several hormones which control the way that every cell in the body uses energy (metabolism). The thyroid is part of the endocrine system.

      Hyperthyroidism or thyrotoxicosis occurs when the thyroid releases too many of its hormones over a short (acute) or long (chronic) period of time. Many diseases and conditions can cause this problem, including:

      Graves disease
      Non-cancerous growths of the thyroid gland or pituitary gland
      Tumors of the testes or ovaries
      Inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the thyroid due to viral infections or other causes
      Ingestion (taking in through the mouth, such as in eating) of large amounts of thyroid hormone
      Ingestion of excessive iodineGraves disease accounts for 85% of all cases of hyperthyroidism.

      Related topics:

      Painless (silent thyroiditis
      Factitious hyperthyroidism
      Hypothyroidism
      Graves disease

      Symptoms

      Weight loss
      Increased appetite
      Nervousness
      Restlessness
      Heat intolerance
      Increased sweating
      Fatigue
      Frequent bowel movements
      Menstrual irregularities in women
      Goiter (visibly enlarged thyroid) may be present
      Additional symptoms that may be associated with this disease:
      Weakness
      Sleeping difficulty
      Clammy skin
      Skin blushing or flushing
      Bounding pulse
      Nausea and vomiting
      Lack of menstruation
      Itching - overall
      Heartbeat sensations
      Hand tremor
      Hair loss
      Diarrhea
      Breast development in men
      High blood pressure
      Protruding eyes (exophthalmos)

      Signs and tests

      Physical examination may reveal thyroid enlargement or goiter. Vital signs (temperature, pulse, rate of breathing, blood pressure) show increased heart rate. Systolic blood pressure (the first number in a blood pressure reading) may be high.

      Laboratory tests that evaluate thyroid function:

      Serum TSH is usually low
      T3 and free T4 are usually high
      This disease may also alter the results of the following tests:
      Vitamin B-12
      TSI
      Triglycerides
      RT3U
      Radioactive iodine uptake
      Glucose test
      Cholesterol test
      Antithyroglobulin antibody

      Treatment

      Treatment varies depending on the cause of the condition and the severity of symptoms. Hyperthyroidism is usually treated with antithyroid medications, radioactive iodine (which destroys the thyroid and stops the excess production of hormones), or surgery to remove the thyroid.

      If the thyroid must be removed with radiation or surgery, replacement thyroid hormones must be taken for the rest of the person's life.

      Beta-blockers like propranolol are used to treat some of the symptoms including rapid heart rate, sweating, and anxiety until the hyperthyroidism can be controlled.

      Expectations (prognosis)

      Hyperthyroidism caused by Graves disease is usually progressive and has many associated complications, some of which are severe and affect quality of life.

      These include complications caused by treatment such as use of radioactive iodine, surgery, and medications to replace thyroid hormones. However, hyperthyroidism is generally treatable and rarely fatal.

      Complications

      Heart-related complications include rapid heart rate, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation.

      Thyroid crisis or storm is an acute worsening of the symptoms of hyperthyroidism that may occur with infection or stress. Fever, decreased mental alertness, and abdominal pain may occur, and immediate hospitalization is needed.

      Hyperthyroidism increases the risk for osteoporosis.
      There may be complications related to surgery, including visible scarring of the neck, hoarseness due to nerve damage to the voice box, and a low calcium level because of damage to the parathyroid glands.

      Complications may be related to replacement of thyroid hormones. If too little hormone is given, symptoms of under-active thyroid can occur including fatigue, increased cholesterol levels, mild weight gain, depression, and slowing of mental and physical activity. If too much hormone is given, the symptoms of hyperthyroidism will come back.

      Calling your health care provider

      Call your health care provider if you have symptoms which could be caused by excessive thyroid hormone production. If the symptoms are associated with a rapid, irregular heartbeat, dizziness, or change in consciousness, go to the emergency room or call the local emergency number (such as 911).

      Call your health care provider if treatment for hyperthyroidism induces symptoms of under-active thyroid, including mental and physical sluggishness, weight gain, and depression.

      Prevention

      There are no general prevention measures to prevent hyperthyroidism.

  33. QUESTION:
    Is there any connection with a slightly enlarged thyroid and a head cold?
    I noticed this week for the first time that my lower neck was slightly swollen (where my neck meets my collar bone). Soon after I developed a sore throat and symptoms of a head cold. Just wondering if these two things might be connected. I plan on seeing a doctor if the swelling continues in what I assume to be my thyroid gland (uniform swelling, very slight).
    Actually, the thyroid is in front of and on the sides of the trachea. And, the swelling is in my lower front neck, not my lymph nodes or tonsils...

    • ANSWER:
      Yes there could be a connection. If you neck area is enlarged then it is very possible that you have an enlarged thyroid, or goiter. Often, a goiter is associated with thyroiditis which can not only cause your thyroid hormones to fluctuate, but cause a fever as well. The "cold like" symptoms can be an inflammatory response to the inflamed thyroid. If you are having other thyroid symptoms such as difficulty swallowing, tenderness in neck, increased/decreased energy, insomnia, heart palpitations, dry hair and skin, increased arthritic pains, or weight gain or loss...then it is very possible that there is a thyroid issue and you should see your doc. Hope this helps.

  34. QUESTION:
    why am I on thyroid replacement as still feel so tired?
    I started on thyroxine some time ago after having a goitre, but I am still so very tired.

    • ANSWER:
      You are simply "Treating a symptom" not solving your problem. Doctors are NOT trained in nutrition or trained to CURE diseases these days. They are being trained to simply "Manage diseases and relieve symptoms" with drugs & surgery. That is not real health and if you are trying to get healthy, that is another paradigm. Taking a drug to do what the thyroid is not doing is just treating the symptom. It does NOTHING for solving the "Root cause" of why the thyroid is not performing well. That is "MAKE BELIEVE HEALTH."

      Glands typically enlarge due to deficiencies as a way to compensate for the lack of nutrients. In the case of the Thyroid, the lack of IODINE is a typical reason. If you have teeth problems that you may or may not be aware of can cause this problem. The thyroid is part of the pituitary axis consisting of 4 glands, the thyroid, pituitary, adrenals, and testes in men and ovaries in women. If your adrenal glands are exhausted, this will affect the thyroid negatively. Taking synthetic hormones to give the thyroid hormones is NOT going to help your adrenal glands that may be the Root cause of your entire problem. That could be due to a poor diet, taking antibiotics, getting vaccinated, and all kinds of issues like that.

      A nutritional therapist can help you sort out the problem.

      good luck to you

  35. QUESTION:
    How do I get my cat to gain weight?
    He is about 10 years old and weighs around 7.5 pounds. He has always been super skinny!! He was the runt of his litter and near dear death at one point. Once I shaved him and he looked so skinny and like a ferret or something haha all my friends laughed at him and made fun of his weight. I feed him so much though! I give him dry food, plain lowfat yogurt, and a can of fancy feast everyday. How can I get him to gain weight?

    • ANSWER:
      I would take him to the vet for a complete check up to rule out any medical condition for his weight loss. Parasites, diabetes, thyroid and liver disease are what pops up in my mind first. Once your vet has examined your cat and ruled out any medical condition then I would suggest you feed a premium quality food like Nutro Natural Choice. My four cats eat Natural Choice and really like it. It's a higher protein, lower carb food that's all natural with no chicken by-products, ground corn or any artificial colors, flavors or preservatives. Your vet can also advice you of the best diet to feed your cat and also how much you should be feeding. Good luck and hope this helps.

      Feline weight loss should be an alarming symptom as it might signal different diseases or the existence of parasites. You cat may lose weight if he is under stress. In each of these cases, visit your vet and find out the cause of the weight loss.
      1. Parasites

      If your cat has parasites, he will lose weight as a consequence of his lack of appetite and vomiting. The most common parasites that cause weight loss are the tapeworm, giardia, heartworm and the hookworm. These are treatable and may be detected in your cat's feces or blood work. However, you need a precise diagnosis from your vet.
      2. Feline Leukemia Virus Disease Complex (FELV)

      The feline leukemia virus is a retrovirus from the same family of viruses as the FELV virus. The leukemia is a fatal disease. It is transmitted through saliva and other secretions.

      The cat will also display symptoms such as fever, depression, enlarged lymph nodes, discoloration of nose and tongue or breathing difficulty. A cat with leukemia has a weak immune system and will be susceptible to a lot of infections.
      3. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBC)

      The inflammatory bowel disease causes chronic vomiting and diarrhea and will lead to weight loss. The upper or lower intestines are affected by inflammatory cells.

      IBD may be treated with some dietary restriction and identifying the cause of the irritation.
      4. Liver Disease

      The liver helps keep the blood free from toxins and facilitates digestion. Liver disease may be caused by increased toxicity in the cat's body, hepatitis or cancer. Besides weight loss, the cat will vomit and have diarrhea. Your pet will have yellow eyes and mucous membranes, suffer from depression, have seizures and bad breath.
      5. Diabetes

      Diabetes is an endocrine disorder caused by the deficiency of insulin in the body. The insulin is needed to properly metabolize the sugars in the blood. Diabetes causes weight loss. You will also notice apathy, constant urination and thirst, vomiting and bad breath.

      Diabetes is not treatable but can be managed by the administration of insulin shots. Detecting the disease is critical.
      6. Kidney Disease

      Kidney failure may be fatal to a cat. If the kidney has lost more than 70% of its filtering function, the cat has kidney failure. The kidney failure is caused by infections, kidney tumors, cysts and kidney disease. Most of the kidney failures are not reversible. Wet diet will be prescribed and phosphorous binders will keep the condition under control.
      7. Stress Induced Weight Loss

      If a cat is under a lot of stress he will lack appetite. The causes of stress may be recent changes in the cat's life, such as moving or the presence of a new pet or person in the home. The stress may be handled through therapy or by reassuring your cat that he is still important to you, and creating a comfortable home in the new place.

      Excessive weight loss can cause feline anemia. Detecting the cause of weight loss is important for your cat's health, as some of these diseases are fatal.

  36. QUESTION:
    Why does even light pressure make my hands and feet tingle?
    Whenever I wear socks, my feet get numb and tingly, and when I wear rings my fingers do. It's very uncomfortable. Why does this happen? Is it poor blood circulation?

    • ANSWER:
      Some of the possible causes of numbness include:

      Sitting or standing in a position for prolonged time
      Injury to a certain nerve can cause numbness in the body part of that nerve, or other parts connected with that nerve channel
      Shingles (herpes zoster) infection is another reason which can lead to numbness
      Pressure on the spinal nerves in condition like slip disk
      Pressure on the peripheral nerve which forms due to enlarged blood vessels, infection or tumors
      No blood supply to a certain body area, can also cause body numbness in the certain body part
      Body numbness at night or during sleep sensation gets worse in people having the peripheral neuropathy condition
      Medical condition of carpel tunnel syndrome where a person gets a pressure on a nerve at the wrist, is a common experienced condition of body numbness during pregnancy
      Other medical condition like diabetes, multiple sclerosis, under active thyroid also lead to body numbness and tingling
      Lack of vitamin B12 in body is also another cause of body numbness
      Certain medications or radiation therapy can also lead to body numbness
      Experiencing right side or left side of body numbness can be a stroke symptom
      Nerve damage due to consumption of lead, tobacco or alcohol can also lead to body numbness and tingling sensation

      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/body-numbness.html

      There are many possible causes of tingling:

      Remaining in the same seated or standing position for a long time
      Injury to a nerve -- for example, a neck injury may cause you to feel numbness anywhere along your arm or hand, while a low back injury can cause numbness or tingling down the back of your leg
      Pressure on the spinal nerves, such as from a herniated disk
      Pressure on peripheral nerves from enlarged blood vessels, tumors, scar tissue, or infection
      Shingles or herpes zoster infection
      Lack of blood supply to an area -- for example, cholesterol (plaque) build up from atherosclerosis in the legs can cause pain, numbness, and tingling while walking (this is called vascular claudication); frostbite can also reduce blood supply and lead to numbness

      Other medical conditions, including:
      Carpal tunnel syndrome (pressure on a nerve at the wrist)
      Diabetes
      Migraines
      Multiple sclerosis
      Seizures
      Stroke
      Transient ischemic attack (TIA), sometimes called a "mini-stroke"
      Underactive thyroid
      Raynaud's phenomenon
      Abnormal levels of calcium, potassium, or sodium in your body
      A lack of vitamin B12 or other vitamin
      Use of certain medications
      Toxic nerve damage due to lead, alcohol, or tobacco
      Radiation therapy

      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003206.htm

  37. QUESTION:
    Can anyone please tell me about hypertyroid?
    I am not sure how you become one, and what are the symtoms, and how you can treat it. Please, I need exact and precise deriptions. Please help.
    Sorry, I kind of misspelled--it's hyperthyroid. :-)

    • ANSWER:
      If you suspect that you have hyperthyroidism, you should really see a doctor. You shouldn't depend on the looney-tunes here on Yahoo! Answers. But if you just want background information:

      Hyperthyroidism:

      Causes: Hyperthyroidism or thyrotoxicosis occurs when the thyroid releases too many of its hormones over a short (acute) or long (chronic) period of time. Many diseases and conditions can cause this problem, including:

      * Graves' disease
      * Non-cancerous growths of the thyroid gland or pituitary gland
      * Tumors of the testes or ovaries
      * Inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the thyroid due to viral infections or other causes
      * Ingestion of excessive amounts of thyroid hormone
      * Ingestion of excessive iodine

      Graves' disease accounts for 85% of all cases of hyperthyroidism.

      Symptoms:
      * Weight loss
      * Increased appetite
      * Nervousness
      * Restlessness
      * Heat intolerance
      * Increased sweating
      * Fatigue
      * Frequent bowel movements
      * Menstrual irregularities in women
      * Goiter (visibly enlarged thyroid) may be present

      Treatment: Treatment varies depending on the cause of the condition and the severity of symptoms. Hyperthyroidism is usually treated with antithyroid medications, radioactive iodine (which destroys the thyroid and thus stops the excess production of hormones), or surgery to remove the thyroid.

      If the thyroid must be removed with radiation or surgery, replacement thyroid hormones must be taken for the rest of the person's life.

      Beta-blockers like propranolol are used to treat some of the symptoms including rapid heart rate, sweating, and anxiety until the hyperthyroidism can be controlled.

      P.S. I'm not a doctor. All of this information is from publicly available sources on the internet.

  38. QUESTION:
    My girlfriend is going into surgery after having fluid drained from her lungs, what could be the problem?
    Last week my girlfriend went into hospital with side pains, it turned out her right lung was half full with fluid. They drained the lung with a needle for three days and took a lot of fluid out, however the x-rays didn't show much difference and they kept her in to do tests. Now she is going to a different hospital for surgery, I haven't had chance to speak to her and all I've gathered is it's quite serious. Can anyone offer any possible explanations?

    • ANSWER:
      Numerous disorders lead to the accumulation of fluid or edema in the lungs.

      Lungs (there are two) are normally air-filled; their main function being to take oxygen from the atmosphere, exchange it with carbon dioxide, and transfer the fresh oxygen to the blood for transport to all the cells in the body.

      The lungs are spongy (comprised of multiple small sacs known as alveoli) organs located in the chest behind the rib cage. When fluid builds up in the alveoli, it interferes with the normal oxygen intake -- causing severe disturbances in body function.

      Shortness of breath
      Gasping for air
      Shortness of breath with activity
      Inability to sleep lying flat (need more than 2 pillows)
      Wheezing sound with breathing
      Wet gurgling sounds in the chest
      Coughing a pinkish or blood-tinged frothy sputum
      Weakness
      Fatigue
      Anxiety and restlessness
      Pounding or Racing Heart rate
      Chest pain or sudden shortness of breath at night waking the patient up
      Breathing may completely stop for a few seconds during sleep
      Swelling (fluid build up) in the feet and ankles
      Fever and other symptoms may occur according to the specific etiology.

      Heart disorders can cause fluid to back up in the blood vessels (veins) that carry blood away from the lungs to the heart. As a result of pressure build-up in these veins, excess fluid leaks out into the alveoli.

      Heart disorders:
      Heart attack (death of heart muscle) or Myocardial Infarction
      Left-sided Heart Failure
      Valvular heart disease -- poorly-functioning doors between heart's 4 chambers
      Arrhythmias -- irregularities in heart rhythm
      Cardiomyopathy -- enlarged, balloon- like myocarditis (i.e., infection of heart muscle)
      Congenital (present at birth) heart diseases -- such as holes in the walls between heart chambers (i.e., atrial and Ventricular Septal Defects).
      Endocarditis -- infection of the valves
      High Blood Pressure
      Volume or fluid overload -- too much liquid intake by a person with diseased heart or kidneys.
      Thyroid disease (hypothyroid or hyperthyroid)
      Beriberi (Vitamin B1 deficiency)
      Others:
      Kidney (renal) failure
      Pneumonia -- infection of the lungs
      Pulmonary Embolism -- blockage of lung blood vessels due to air bubbles, fat, amniotic fluid (in newborns), or clotted blood
      Pancreatitis -- irritation, infection, or damage to the pancreas.
      Drug overdose -- heroin and others
      Shock
      Drowning
      High altitude sickness -- rapid climbing to heights (mountains) can cause Pulmonary Edema and other problems.

      History:
      Symptoms

      Illnesses

      Medications

      Surgeries

      Habits

      Family history

      Birth history

      Allergies

      Travel history
      Medical exam:
      Patient will appear breathless with nasal flaring (sides of nose moving outward with each breath)

      The pulse rate (heart rate) may be faster than normal (60-100 beats per minute)

      The doctor, using a stethoscope, will hear the fluid in the lungs (rales and crepitations) and abnormal or extra heart sounds.
      Tests:
      Arterial blood gas test -- blood oxygen levels are lower than normal (hypoxia).

      Blood test may show that carbon dioxide levels are lower than normal (hypocarbia).

      Other blood tests may be necessary in diagnosing the cause (e.g., high CPK levels in heart attack and Amylase in pancreatitis).

      Chest X-Ray will show fluid in the lungs.

      Electrocardiogram (measures electrical activity of the heart), Echocardiogram (uses sound waves to create a picture of the heart), and CAT scan can also be helpful in pinpointing the exact cause of the edema.

      A cardiologist (heart doctor) may be called to perform a cardiac catheterization or Swan-Ganz catheterization, which are techniques that can provide valuable information about the heart and edema.

  39. QUESTION:
    What are the causes and symptoms of thyroid infection and how can it be countered?

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroiditis

      Inflammation of the Thyroid Gland

      Thyroiditis is an inflammation (not an infection) of the thyroid gland. Several types of thyroiditis exist and the treatment is different for each.

      Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis (also called autoimmune or chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis) is the most common type of thyroiditis. It is named after the Japanese physician, Hakaru Hashimoto, that first described it in 1912. The thyroid gland is always enlarged, although only one side may be enlarged enough to feel. During the course of this disease, the cells of the thyroid becomes inefficient in converting iodine into thyroid hormone and "compensates" by enlarging (for a review of this process see our function page). The radioactive iodine uptake may be paradoxically high while the patient is hypothyroid because the gland retains the ability to take-up or "trap" iodine even after it has lost its ability to produce thyroid hormone. As the disease progresses, the TSH increases since the pituitary is trying to induce the thyroid to make more hormone, the T4 falls since the thyroid can't make it, and the patient becomes hypothyroid. The sequence of events can occur over a relatively short span of a few weeks or may take several years.

      Treatment is to start thyroid hormone replacement. This prevents or corrects the hypothyroidism and it also generally keeps the gland from getting larger.

      In most cases the thyroid gland will decrease in size once thyroid hormone replacement is started.

      Thyroid antibodies are present in 95% of patients with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and serve as a useful "marker" in identifying the disease without thyroid biopsy or surgery.

      Thyroid antibodies may remain for years after the disease has been adequately treated and the patient is on thyroid hormone replacement.

      De Quervain's Thyroiditis. De Quervain's Thyroiditis (also called subacute or granulomatous thyroiditis) was first described in 1904 and is much less common than Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. The thyroid gland generally swells rapidly and is very painful and tender. The gland discharges thyroid hormone into the blood and the patients become hyperthyroid; however the gland quits taking up iodine (radioactive iodine uptake is very low) and the hyperthyroidism generally resolves over the next several weeks.

      Patients frequently become ill with fever and prefer to be in bed.

      Thyroid antibodies are not present in the blood, but the sedimentation rate, which measures inflammation, is very high.

      Although this type of thyroiditis resembles an infection within the thyroid gland, no infectious agent has ever been identified and antibiotics are of no use.

      Treatment is usually bed rest and aspirin to reduce inflammation.

      Occasionally cortisone (steroids) (to reduce inflammation) and thyroid hormone (to "rest" the thyroid gland) may be used in prolonged cases.

      Nearly all patients recover and the thyroid gland returns to normal after several weeks or months.

      A few patients will become hypothyroid once the inflammation settles down and therefore will need to stay on thyroid hormone replacement indefinitely.

      Recurrences are uncommon.

      Silent Thyroiditis. Silent Thyroiditis is the third and least common type of thyroiditis. It was not recognized until the 1970's although it probably existed and was treated as Graves' Disease before that. This type of thyroiditis resembles in part Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and in part De Quervain's Thyroiditis. The blood thyroid test are high and the radioactive iodine uptake is low (like De Quervain's Thyroiditis), but there is no pain and needle biopsy resembles Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. The majority of patients have been young women following pregnancy. The disease usually needs no treatment and 80% of patients show complete recovery and return of the thyroid gland to normal after three months. Symptoms are similar to Graves' Disease except milder. The thyroid gland is only slightly enlarged and exophthalmos (development of "bug eyes") does not occur. Treatment is usually bed rest with beta blockers to control palpitations (drugs to prevent rapid heart rates). Radioactive iodine, surgery, or antithyroid medication is never needed. A few patients have become permanently hypothyroid and needed to be placed on thyroid hormone

  40. QUESTION:
    What does my doctor mean by saying: I have a little fluid in my lungs?
    I was just informed by my doctor that I have some fluid in my lungs.He said it was very little and gave me some medicine. I have been feeling faint, dizzy, lightheadness, pressure on my chest, shortness of breath, extreme fatigue and my right eye feels cloudy. Does anyone know what this might be?
    I also have a nasty cough.

    • ANSWER:
      Why didn't you ask your doctor? Anyways, numerous disorders lead to the accumulation of fluid or edema in the lungs.
      Lungs (there are two) are normally air-filled; their main function being to take oxygen from the atmosphere, exchange it with carbon dioxide, and transfer the fresh oxygen to the blood for transport to all the cells in the body.the lungs are spongy (comprised of multiple small sacs known as alveoli) organs located in the chest behind the rib cage. When fluid builds up in the alveoli, it interferes with the normal oxygen intake -- causing severe disturbances in body function. What you have are just the symptoms of the Pulmonary Edema.

      Heart disorders can cause fluid to back up in the blood vessels (veins) that carry blood away from the lungs to the heart. As a result of pressure build-up in these veins, excess fluid leaks out into the alveoli.

      Heart disorders:
      1. Heart attack (death of heart muscle) or Myocardial Infarction
      2. Left-sided Heart Failure
      3. Valvular heart disease -- poorly-functioning doors between heart's 4 chambers
      4. Arrhythmias -- irregularities in heart rhythm
      5. Cardiomyopathy -- enlarged, balloon- like myocarditis (infection of heart muscle)
      6. Congenital (present at birth) heart diseases -- such as holes in the walls between heart chambers (atrial and Ventricular Septal Defects).
      7. Endocarditis -- infection of the valves
      8. High Blood Pressure
      9. Volume or fluid overload -- too much liquid intake by a person with diseased heart or kidneys.
      10. Thyroid disease (hypothyroid or hyperthyroid)
      11. Beriberi (Vitamin B1 deficiency)

      Other reasons:

      1. Kidney (renal) failure
      2. Pneumonia -- infection of the lungs
      3. Pulmonary Embolism -- blockage of lung blood vessels due to air bubbles, fat, amniotic fluid (in newborns), or clotted blood
      4. Pancreatitis -- irritation, infection, or damage to the pancreas.
      5. Drug overdose -- heroin and others
      Shock
      6. Drowning
      7. High altitude sickness -- rapid climbing to heights (mountains) can cause Pulmonary Edema and other problems.

  41. QUESTION:
    How long would it take me 2 lose 80 pounds?
    I'm 5' 7" and 240 pounds, but actually in decent shape. I'm in college and have been going 2 the gym 4 days a week for the past month and have been eating pretty healthy. I need 2 lose 80 pounds 2 get at 25 Bmi which is border line normal/over weight.

    • ANSWER:
      About 2 to 3 months to shed 80 pounds.

      Homeopathic Remedies for Obesity - Corpulence and Fatness (Without any side effects or Complications):-

      OBESITY (Corpulence) along with:-

      Tongue thickly white coated; patient feels exhausted in warm water Antim Crud 200, 6 hourly

      With unusual tallness in children; chilly patient Silicea 30X or 30, 4 hourly

      When the tongue is constantly whitish coated; with liver disorders Kali Mur 30 or 6X, 4 hourly

      Fat, flabby and chilly patients. Profuse sweat on hand; worse at night, by exertion; easily fatigued; feet are cold and damp; craving for eggs; sensitive to cold and damp climate Calcarea Carb 200, 4 hourly

      Especially for fatty women approaching menopause; sensitive to cold weather; liver and spleen enlarged Calcarea Ars 200, 6 hourly

      Obese patient who suffers from constipation; flatulence; goiter or thyroid enlargements Fucus Ves Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 10 -20 drops in a sip of warm water

      Intercurrent remedy; specially when obesity is due to thyroid disturbances Thyroidinum 200 or 1M, once weekly (3 Doses)

      Obese, chilly, constipated patients, specially in women when there is a history of delayed menstruation; prone to skin ailments; feels cold; easily chilled and easily overheated Graphites 200 or 1M, once weekly (6 Doses)

      For fatty women; feels completely exhausted; (whether they do anything or not) Lac Def 200 weekly (6 Doses)

      To reduce weight (flesh and fat); to make the muscles hard and firm Calotropis 30 or 200, 6 hourly

      To absorb abnormal tissues; new growths and fat Phytolacca berry Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly,10 drops in a sip of warm water. (Also available in tablet form)

      Obese patient with weak heart; sensitive to cold; aversion to water; habits of uncleanliness; prone to colds Ammon Carb 200, 6 hourly

      FATNESS along with:-

      With excessive appetite; obesity after abdominal operation; craving for eggs; chilly patient Calcarea Carb 200 or 1M, once weekly (6 Doses)

      If Calcarea Carb fails; specific for persons suffering from goiter Fucus Ves Q (Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 20 - 30 drops in a sip of warm water.

      Accompanied with unhealthy skin. Obesity during menopause; stools constipated Graphites 200, 6 hourly

      In shy and emotional weepy individuals; loss of thirst; feels better in open air Pulsatilla 200, 6 hourly.

      When due to malfunctioning of thyroid gland Thyroidinum 200 or 1M, once fortnightly (6 Doses)

      To reduce fats from the body (also available in tablet form) Phytolacca berry Q(Mother Tincture) 4 hourly, 10 - 15 drops in a sip of warm water. Starts showing results in about 30 to 45 days but you have to be patient and once you get rid of excessive fat using it you do not gain it back cause you are cured .

      Obesity with flesh decreases, muscles become harder and firmer Calotropis 30 or 200 6 hourly

      Fatness; more around buttocks and thighs Ammonium Mur 200, 6 hourly

      Fatness; due to gastric complaints; constipations; tongue thickly whitish coated as if white washed Antim Crud 200, 6 hourly.

      Take the remedy which is similar to your symptoms. No side effects or complications if taken as directed, please do not exceed the given dosage and under any circumstances do not try to mix any remedies and avoid Chocolates, Mints, Coffee, Red Meat, Alcoholic and Carbonated drinks, Spicy Rich Food while taking any Homeopathic remedies, and keep the medicines away from direct sunlight, heat strong smells and perfumes and do not store them in the fridge. Curing without any side effects or Complications that’s the Beauty of Homeopathic Medicine. Homeopathic remedies are available over the counter on most health and herb stores in USA and EU or you can buy them online from a number of authentic sites.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  42. QUESTION:
    how do I get rid of numbness in my pinky and ring finger?
    It has been going on for a long time for about a few months now.

    • ANSWER:
      You need to find the cause and treat the cause. Some of the possible causes of numbness include:

      Sitting or standing in a position for prolonged time
      Injury to a certain nerve can cause numbness in the body part of that nerve, or other parts connected with that nerve channel
      Shingles (herpes zoster) infection is another reason which can lead to numbness
      Pressure on the spinal nerves in condition like slip disk
      Pressure on the peripheral nerve which forms due to enlarged blood vessels, infection or tumors
      No blood supply to a certain body area, can also cause body numbness in the certain body part
      Body numbness at night or during sleep sensation gets worse in people having the peripheral neuropathy condition
      Medical condition of carpel tunnel syndrome where a person gets a pressure on a nerve at the wrist, is a common experienced condition of body numbness during pregnancy
      Other medical condition like diabetes, multiple sclerosis, under active thyroid also lead to body numbness and tingling
      Lack of vitamin B12 in body is also another cause of body numbness
      Certain medications or radiation therapy can also lead to body numbness
      Experiencing right side or left side of body numbness can be a stroke symptom
      Nerve damage due to consumption of lead, tobacco or alcohol can also lead to body numbness and tingling sensation

      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/body-numbness.html

      Numbness - Toes

      There are several possible causes of numbness in the toes, including:

      Degenerative Disc Disease & Sciatica
      Multiple Sclerosis
      Peripheral Neuropathy
      Peripheral Vascular Disease
      Raynaud's Phenomenon
      Vasculitis
      Neuroma
      Peroneal Nerve Irritation
      Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

  43. QUESTION:
    What types of side effects have you had from Geodon?
    I just started on this medication after trying others but, the side effects I read about really scare me. I would like to hear the pros and cons from others who have taken it. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Most important fact about this drug:
      In some people with heart problems or a slow heartbeat, Geodon can cause serious and potentially fatal heartbeat irregularities. The chance of a problem is greater if you are taking a water pill (diuretic) or a medication that prolongs a part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval. Many of the drugs prescribed for heartbeat irregularities prolong the QT interval and should never be combined with Geodon. Other drugs to avoid when taking Geodon include Anzemet, Avelox, Halfan, Inapsine, Lariam, Mellaril, Nebupent, Orap, Orlaam, Pentam, Probucol, Prograf, Serentil, Tequin, Thorazine, Trisenox, and Zagam. If you're uncertain about the risks of any drug you're taking, be sure to check with your doctor before combining it with Geodon.

      Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, inform your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Geodon.

      More common side effects may include:
      Accidental injury, cold symptoms, constipation, cough, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, indigestion, muscle tightness, nausea, rash, stuffy and runny nose, upper respiratory infection, vision problems, weakness

      Other side effects may include:
      Abdominal pain, abnormal body movements, abnormal ejaculation, abnormal secretion of milk, abnormal walk, abnormally low cholesterol, agitation, amnesia, anemia, bleeding gums, bleeding in the eye, blood clots, blood disorders, blood in urine, body spasms, breast development in males, bruising or purple spots, cataracts, chest pain, chills, clogged bowels, confusion, conjunctivitis (pinkeye), coordination problems, decreased blood flow to the heart, delirium, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, difficulty with orgasm, double vision, dry eyes, enlarged heart, eyelid inflammation, female sexual problems, fever, flank pain, flu-like symptoms, fungal infections, gout, hair loss, heavy menstruation, heavy uterine or vaginal bleeding, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, hives, hostility, impotence, increased reflexes, increased sensitivity to touch or sound, inflammation of the cornea, inflammation of the heart, involuntary or jerky movements, irregular heartbeat, liver problems, lockjaw, loss of appetite, loss of menstruation, low blood sugar, low blood pressure, low body temperature, lymph disorders, male sexual problems, muscle disorders, muscle pain, muscle weakness, nighttime urination, nosebleed, pneumonia, prickling or tingling sensation, rapid heartbeat, rectal bleeding, rigid muscle movement, ringing in ears, rolling of the eyeballs, sensitivity to sunlight, skin problems, slow heartbeat, slowed movement, speech problems, stroke, sudden drop in blood pressure upon standing up, swelling in the arms and legs, swelling in the face, swollen lymph nodes, swollen tongue, tarry stools, tendon inflammation, thirst, throat spasms, thyroid disorders, tremor, twitching, uncontrolled eye movement, urination decrease or increase, vaginal bleeding, vein inflammation, vertigo, vision disorders, vomiting, vomiting or spitting blood, yellowed skin and eyes, weight gain, white spots in the mouth.

      Special warnings about this medication:
      Remember that Geodon can cause dangerous--even fatal--heartbeat irregularities. Warning signs include dizziness, palpitations, and fainting. Tell your doctor immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Be careful to avoid drugs that prolong the QT interval of the heartbeat. Check with your doctor before combining any other medication with Geodon.

      Particularly during the first few days of therapy, Geodon can cause low blood pressure, with accompanying dizziness, fainting, and rapid heartbeat. Tell your doctor if you experience any of these side effects. To minimize such problems, your doctor will increase your dose gradually. If you are prone to low blood pressure, take blood pressure medicine, become dehydrated, or have heart disease or poor circulation in the brain, use Geodon with caution.

      Geodon may cause drowsiness and can impair your judgment, thinking, and motor skills. Use caution while driving and don't operate potentially dangerous machinery until you know how this drug affects you.

      Geodon poses a very slight risk of seizures, especially if you are over age 65, have a history of seizures, or have Alzheimer's disease.

      Drugs such as Geodon sometimes cause a condition called Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome. Symptoms include high fever, muscle rigidity, irregular pulse or blood pressure, rapid heartbeat, excessive perspiration, and changes in heart rhythm. If these symptoms appear, tell your doctor immediately. You'll need to stop taking Geodon while the condition is under treatment.

      There also is the risk of developing tardive dyskinesia, a condition marked by slow, rhythmical, involuntary movements. This problem is more likely to occur in mature adults, especially older women. When it does, use of Geodon is usually stopped.

      Geodon can suppress the cough reflex; you may have trouble clearing your airway. Some people taking Geodon also develop a rash. Tell your doctor when this happens. If the rash doesn't clear up with treatment, you may have to discontinue the drug.

      Other antipsychotic medications have been known to interfere with the body's temperature-regulating mechanism, causing the body to overheat. Although this problem has not occurred with Geodon, caution is still advisable. Avoid exposure to extreme heat, strenuous exercise, and dehydration. There also is a remote chance that this medication may cause abnormal, prolonged and painful erections.

      Remember that you must never combine Geodon with any drug that prolongs the part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval (see "Most important fact about this drug"). Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you have any doubts about a drug you're taking.

      If Geodon is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Geodon with the following:
      Carbamazepine (Tegretol)
      Certain blood pressure medications
      Drugs that boost the effects of dopamine such as Mirapex, Parlodel, Permax, and Requip
      Drugs that affect the brain and nervous system, such as sedatives, tranquilizers, and antidepressants
      Ketoconazole (Nizoral)
      Levodopa (Larodopa, Sinemet)

  44. QUESTION:
    What is cause, symptoms, treatment for chronic myologic leukemia?

    • ANSWER:
      CML can occur in adults (usually middle-aged) and children. The disease affects 1 to 2 people per 100,000 and accounts for 7 - 20% cases of leukemia. It is usually associated with a chromosome abnormality called the Philadelphia chromosome.

      CML causes rapid growth of the blood-forming cells (myeloid precursors) in the bone marrow, peripheral blood, and body tissues.

      Exposure to ionizing radiation is one possible trigger for this chromosome abnormality. Such exposure could occur from a nuclear disaster or from treatment of a previous cancer, like thyroid cancer or Hodgkin's lymphoma. However, the vast majority of people treated for cancer with radiation do not go on to develop leukemia. It takes many years to develop leukemia from this cause.

      Signs and Symptoms :
      CML signs and symptoms tend to develop slowly. Some patients learn about their CML after a routine blood test given during a check up.

      Some changes that a person with CML may have are:

      Tiredness
      Shortness of breath doing activities
      Pale-looking skin
      Enlarged spleen
      Night sweats
      Weight loss
      These signs and symptoms for CML are common to other illnesses.

      Diagnosis
      Lab tests are used to make a CML diagnosis. They are also used to check a patient's response to treatment.

      Blood and Bone Marrow Tests
      Blood and bone marrow tests are done to look for leukemia cells to find out if a person has CML. In CML, the white cell count increases, often to very high levels. Platelet counts may also be high. Levels of hemoglobin go down.

      A CML diagnosis is usually clear from an exam of blood cells. A bone marrow aspirate and a bone marrow biopsy are two tests that are done to look at the marrow cells for changes that can't be seen in cells in the blood. These tests may help the doctor to choose the best treatment for the patient. The tests also help the doctor to follow the effects of therapy.

      Cytogenetic Analysis
      Cytogenetic analysis is a lab test to examine the chromosomes of the leukemia cells. This test helps the doctor to find out if the patient's type of leukemia is CML.

      FISH is a lab test used to measure the patient's percent of CML cells.

      PCR is a very sensitive test that is used when there are no CML cells found by FISH.

      Treatment
      Some CML patients may want to get a second medical opinion. It is important to get treatment in a center where doctors are experienced in the care of patients with CML.

      Chronic Phase Treatment - Drug Therapy
      The goal of treating chronic phase CML is to bring the level of blood cells back to normal and to get rid of all cells with the BCR-ABL cancer gene.

  45. QUESTION:
    Thyroid abnormal labs what does it mean?
    I have Thyroglobulin 201 (normal 0-74) and TSH 0.007 , normal t3 and t 4 endo doctor says it is just stress , my family dr says it's hyperthyroidism and need treat. Anyone here knows more about that? I am confused!

    • ANSWER:
      Most people with low TSH have hyperthyroidism but along with that your T3 and T4 levels should be high, T3 & T4 free values may be a better indicator.

      Rarely there is a problem with the pituitary gland, TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) is produced by the pituitary. This can cause hypothyroidism, but you would also have low T3 and T4 values.

      Did I add to the confusion? I would look at your symptoms, ask your doctor if an MRI of your pituitary is needed. I think the pituitary may be the problem, whether stress is the cause or not.

      http://www.labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/thyroglobulin/test.html

      Small amounts of thyroglobulin are normal in patients with normal thyroid function. Patients with an enlarged thyroid gland (goiter), thyroiditis (inflamed thyroid), or hyperthyroidism may have elevated thyroglobulin levels, although the test is not routinely ordered with these conditions.

      I am not a doctor an my opinions should not be taken as gospel. I had my thyroid removed after cancer and my knowledge is limited.

  46. QUESTION:
    What is good for bags under the eyes due to graves disease which causes fluid retention.?
    I have tried all kinds of eye creams and even take fluid pills once in a while. It makes me look older than I am and I would like to change that if possible.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Grandma V

      Here is a remedy and some other ideas for your condition.

      Cucumber Honey Eye Nourisher

      Ingredients:
      1 Tbsp. aloe vera gel
      2 tsp. cucumber, peeled with seeds removed
      1/2 tsp. honey
      1/2 tsp. chamomile tea

      Directions:
      Steep chamomile tea in boiling water. Set aside to cool. In food processor or blender combine cucumber, aloe vera and honey. Blend on low setting. Add chamomile tea. Blend until smooth. Apply gently under eyes using ring finger. Store in glass dish covered with plastic wrap in refrigerator for up to one week. Best applied chilled.

      Benefits:
      Reduces puffiness, cools and refreshes contours under eyes.

      Hyperthyroidism may be associated with and often is called Graves' disease, a condition characterized by an enlarged thyroid, bulging eyes bulge, rash and swelling in front of the lower leg.

      Cause
      Abnormal immune response is believed be a possible cause of hypothyroidism. The exact cause is not known, but certain antibodies from the immune system will launch an assault on the thyroid, disturbing hormone production. Lumps or tumors that form on the thyroid also disrupt hormone production. Temporary hyperthyroidism can be caused by infection or inflammation, and certain prescription drugs.

      Hyperthyroidism is less common than Hypothyroidism, yet for both diseases, women appear to be more susceptible than men. Be aware that a malfunctioning thyroid may be the cause of recurring illnesses.

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Natural Cures

      Diet: Eat an organic, whole foods diet, emphasizing foods that naturally suppress excess thyroid hormone production. Such foods include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, mustard greens, rutabagas, spinach, turnips, soybeans, peaches, and pears. Eliminate dairy products, over consumption of wheat products, coffee, tea, and caffeinated soft drinks.

      Hydrotherapy: Hydrotherapy is the application of water, ice, steam and hot and cold temperatures to maintain and restore health. Treatments include full body immersion, steam baths, saunas, sitz baths, colonic irrigation and the application of hot and/or cold compresses. Hydrotherapy is effective for treating a wide range of conditions and can easily be used in the home as part of a self-care program. Many Naturopathic Physicians, Physical Therapists and Day Spas use Hydrotherapy as part of treatment. I suggest several at-home hydrotherapy treatments.

      Homeopathy: The homeopathic remedy Thyroidium is very helpful in assisting in proper thyroid regulation.

      Juice Therapy: Drink carrot, celery, spinach, and parsley juice; or juice made from a combination of cabbage, watercress, and spinach.

      Nutritional Supplementation: The following nutrients can help regulate thyroid function: vitamin A, vitamin B complex, vitamin B1 (thiamine), vitamin C, calcium, magnesium, choline, trace minerals, iodine, kelp, and thyroid glandulars.

      Alternative Professional Care
      If your symptoms persist despite the above measures, seek the help of a qualified health professional. The following professional care therapies have all been shown to be useful for treating hyperthyroidism: Acupuncture, Biofeedback Training, Homeopathy, Magnetic Field Therapy, Naturopathic Medicine, Qigong, and Traditional Chinese Medicine.

      Best of health to you

  47. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of this horrid rash?
    I've been sick for a while now, a bad cough. I've had a few fevers since I've gotten the cough. Well this morning I woke up and a rash was on my arms and legs. It's a red, raised rash... appearing in random blotches. I bought some cortisone and rubbed it on my skin. Still no success. Any good home remedies or medicines I could try out to help calm it?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not a doctor but a podiatrist. I am studying allergy.
      Basically, the 'target rash' is an allergy to the cough bacteria, some sort of strep.....
      You should try the anti-histamine Fexofenadine 180mg per day, 60mg every 8 hours is best.

      Erythema annulare centrifugum
      This covers a number of chronic annular (ring-shaped) and erythematous (red) skin eruptions. A large number of other descriptive terms have been used to classify these types of lesions, some of which include figurate erythema, annular erythema, erythema perstans, erythema gyratum perstans, erythema gyratum repens and erythema figuratum perstans.

      Erythema gyratum repens
      (due to gastric carcinoma)
      Erythema annulare centrifugum (annular erythema).
      What are the signs and symptoms?
      Eruptions may occur at any time throughout life, from infancy to old age. The eruption usually begins as small raised pink-red spot that slowly enlarges and forms a ring shape while the central area flattens and clears. There may be an inner rim of scale. The rings enlarge at a rate of about 2-5 mm/day until they reach a diameter of about 6-8 cm. Sometimes the lesions do not form complete rings but grow into irregular shapes. One or several lesions may be present.

      Lesions most often appear on the thighs and legs, but may occur on the face, trunk and arms. They are usually without symptoms but in some patients may cause mild itching.

      What causes erythema annulare centrifugum?
      Often no specific cause for the eruptions is found. However, it has been noted that erythema annulare centrifugum is sometimes linked to underlying diseases and conditions. These include:

      ¦Bacterial, fungal and viral infections such as tuberculosis, sinusitis, candidiasis or tinea
      ¦Drugs including chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, oestrogen, penicillin and amitriptyline
      ¦Cancer (especially the type known as erythema gyratum perstans, in which there are concentric and whirling rings)
      ¦Food, most often blue cheese or tomatoes
      ¦Recurrent or chronic appendicitis
      ¦Cholestatic liver disease (blocked bile system)
      ¦Graves disease (overactive thyroid gland)
      In these situations, erythema annulare centrifugum resolves once the underlying cause is treated or the offending drug is stopped.

      What is the treatment of erythema annulare centrifugum?
      Erythema annulare centrifugum usually clears up by itself. Eruptions may be last from anywhere between a few weeks to many years (the average duration is 11 months). Most cases require no treatment, however topical corticosteroids may be helpful in reducing redness, swelling and itchiness.

      Related information
      References:
      Book: Textbook of Dermatology. Ed Rook A, Wilkinson DS, Ebling FJB, Champion RH, Burton JL. Fourth edition. Blackwell Scientific Publications.

      On DermNet NZ:
      ¦Rheumatic fever, erythema marginatum
      ¦Lyme disease, erythema migrans
      Other websites:
      ¦Erythema Annulare Centrifugum – from Medscape Reference
      Books:
      See the DermNet NZ bookstore

      Author: Vanessa Ngan, staff writer
      lergy.

  48. QUESTION:
    Is there any store you can buy a product to help you with gynecomastia that isnt online?
    im not to big, but one problem i've always had was dealing with my man boobs. i've tried working them out and tryed dieting, but nothing seems to work. I dunno if i have gnecomastia, but i think it may be a possibility. Please if anyone can knows what i can do or where i can get something to help me out i would be extremely greatful.

    • ANSWER:
      What is gynecomastia?

      Gynecomastia is overdevelopment of the male breast. The glandular tissue of the breast swells, usually in response to an excess of the female hormone estrogen or a lack of testosterone, a male hormone. It occurs in babies, adolescent boys, and older men.

      What causes gynecomastia?

      In newborns, gynecomastia is caused by estrogen from the mother. It usually goes away in 2 to 3 weeks after birth.

      In adolescent boys, gynecomastia is caused by the hormonal changes of puberty. About one-third of 13- and 14-year-old boys are affected.

      When gynecomastia occurs in adult males, it is usually caused by an underlying condition, such as liver or lung cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, overactive thyroid, or hormone problems, such as cancer of the pituitary gland, adrenal glands, or testicles. Alcohol, marijuana, methamphetamine, and heroin use also may cause gynecomastia.

      Use of certain medications may also cause gynecomastia, including:

      Steroids, such as prednisone or Hexadrol.
      Medications used to treat ulcers (such as cimetidine).
      Medications used to treat epilepsy (such as phenytoin [Dilantin]).
      Digitalis and other heart medications.
      Chemotherapy drugs, especially alkylating agents, a family of anticancer drugs that interfere with cells' DNA and inhibit cancer cell growth.
      Antiandrogen drugs (such as flutamide, cyproterone, and spironolactone).
      Antianxiety and antidepressant medications (such as diazepam [Valium] and tricyclic antidepressants).
      What are the symptoms?

      In addition to having enlarged breasts, men or boys with gynecomastia may notice their breasts feel rubbery or firm. Boys may have a breast bud on one or both sides about the size of a nickel or quarter. Breast buds may last up to 18 months but usually go away on their own.

      How is gynecomastia diagnosed?

      Gynecomastia can usually be diagnosed from a physical examination and medical history. In most cases, tests are not necessary. However, if the breast lump is unusually large, one-sided, tender, or hard and fixed, other tests may be done to rule out other problems.

      How is it treated?

      Gynecomastia in babies and adolescents normally does not require treatment and will usually resolve on its own. If caused by medication or disease, stopping the medication or treating the disease will often cure the gynecomastia. If caused by a lack of testosterone and increase in estrogen, hormonal treatment may be prescribed.

  49. QUESTION:
    Question about Thyroid levels and medicine for it?
    My T4 levels on my Thyroid test showed that they were really low, the doctor is putting me on medicine that I will be starting tonight, how long does it take before I start feeling better?

    • ANSWER:
      Hypothyroidism is thyroid hormone deficiency. It is diagnosed by clinical features such as a typical facies, hoarse slow speech, and dry skin and by low levels of thyroid hormones. Management includes treatment of the cause and administration of thyroxine.
      Normal Results of T4 test:-
      A typical normal range is 4.5 to 11.2 micrograms per deciliter (mcg/dL).
      Lower-than-normal levels of T4 may indicate:
      * Hypothyroidism (including Hashimoto's disease and several other disorders involving an underactive thyroid)
      * Illness
      * Malnutrition or fasting
      * Use of certain medications
      Levothyroxine, a thyroid hormone, is used to treat hypothyroidism, a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone. Without this hormone, the body cannot function properly, resulting in poor growth, slow speech, lack of energy, weight gain, hair loss, dry thick skin, and increased sensitivity to cold. When taken correctly, levothyroxine reverses these symptoms. Levothyroxine is also used to treat congenital hypothyroidism (cretinism) and goiter (enlarged thyroid gland).
      Levothyroxine controls hypothyroidism, but does not cure it. It may take several weeks before you notice a change in your symptoms. Continue to take levothyroxine even if you feel well. Do not stop taking levothyroxine without talking to your doctor.

  50. QUESTION:
    what happens if i drink animal blood?
    i want 2 know cause i wanna be a vampire but i cant drink other peoples blood because of hiv /aids...
    will drinking animal blood kill me or make me sick ?

    • ANSWER:
      If you eat red meat, and most of us do, then we already consume some animal blood. Animal blood is mostly protein, since the red blood cells in blood are mostly made of protein. Drinking raw blood is a lot like eating raw meat, you get whatever parasites and germs that may be living in the blood just as you get whatever parasites and germs there is in raw meat if you don't cook it thoroughly. Animal blood doesn't have any medicinal powers or mythical powers. Most people around the world consume animal blood everyday when they eat meat. No big deal except that you may ingest too much iron. There is no way the body can get rid of excess iron. Excess iron in the body is called hemochromatosis.

      "Joint pain is the most common complaint of people with hemochromatosis. Other common symptoms include fatigue, lack of energy, abdominal pain, loss of sex drive, and heart problems. However, many people have no symptoms when they are diagnosed.

      If the disease is not detected and treated early, iron may accumulate in body tissues and eventually lead to serious problems such as

      * arthritis
      * liver disease, including an enlarged liver, cirrhosis, cancer, and liver failure
      * damage to the pancreas, possibly causing diabetes
      * heart abnormalities, such as irregular heart rhythms or congestive heart failure
      * impotence
      * early menopause
      * abnormal pigmentation of the skin, making it look gray or bronze
      * thyroid deficiency
      * damage to the adrenal glands"

      So, think about what the excess iron you consume may do to your body before consuming too much blood.

enlarged thyroid symptoms and causes