Early Symptoms Of Low Thyroid Function

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is a blood pressure reading of 136/105 dangerous?
    I am overweight right now and take thyroid medicine because I have low thyroid function. Earlier in the evening I was exercising, really not overexerting myself, I rest between exercises. I take blood pressure medicine, also. Earlier in the evening my BP reading was like 150/90 or something, I was concerned but since I had been exercising I assumed that's why it was up, however, I took my BP medicine anyway to make sure it was coming down. Several hours later after NOT having done ANY exercising and was sitting still I took my blood pressure monitor reading again, and the TOP number had come down but now the BOTTOM number (diastolic) is UP! Could this be because of the thyroid medicine I took? The blood pressure medicine usually brings down BOTH top and bottom. Should I be concerned? My blood pressure fluctuates throughout the day and like a car with something wrong and you take it to the garage and it's working perfectly, when I went to the doctor a couple of months ago, my blood pressure reading was perfect. Is it possible I need a new monitor, the one I have is probably about 10 years old.

    • ANSWER:
      Stress induced fluctuation BP. Those high figures are not good at times, chart out minimal possible stress schedule.
      I gave up driving because I get those stress symptom and palpitation during rush
      hours.
      You mean you are off thyroid medication/s,+ BP medications, than you talk out with your doctor,as early as possible.
      Khan's advise is good too.

  2. QUESTION:
    What are some of the symptoms, treatment, and life expectancy for someone who suffers from a type of Dementia?
    What are some of the symptoms, treatment, and life expectancy for someone who suffers from some a type of Dementia?

    • ANSWER:
      Definition
      Dementia is not a specific disorder or disease. It is a syndrome (group of symptoms) associated with a progressive loss of memory and other intellectual functions that is serious enough to interfere with performing the tasks of daily life. Dementia can occur to anyone at any age from an injury or from oxygen deprivation, although it is most commonly associated with aging. It is the leading cause of institutionalization of older adults.

      Description
      The definition of dementia has become more inclusive over the past several decades. Whereas earlier descriptions of dementia emphasized memory loss, the last three editions of the professional's diagnostic handbook, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders(also known as the DSM) define dementia as an overall decline in intellectual function, including difficulties with language, simple calculations, planning and judgment, and motor (muscular movement) skills as well as loss of memory. Although dementia is not caused by aging itself- most researchers regard it as resulting from injuries, infections, braindiseases, tumors, or other disorders- it is quite common in older people. The prevalence of dementia increases rapidly with age; it doubles every five years after age 60. Dementia affects only 1% of people aged 60- 64 but 30%- 50% of those older than 85. About four to five million persons in the United States are affected by dementia as of 2002. Surveys indicate that dementia is the condition most feared by older adults in the United States.

      Causes and symptoms
      Causes
      Dementia can be caused by nearly forty different diseases and conditions, ranging from dietary deficiencies and metabolic disorders to head injuries and inherited diseases. The possible causes of dementia can be categorized as follows:

      Primary dementia. These dementias are characterized by damage to or wasting away of the brain tissue itself. They include Alzheimer's disease(AD), frontal lobe dementia (FLD), and Pick's disease. FLD is dementia caused by a disorder (usually genetic) that affects the front portion of the brain, and Pick's disease is a rare type of primary dementia that is characterized by a progressive loss of social skills, language, and memory, leading to personality changes and sometimes loss of moral judgment.
      Multi-infarct dementia (MID). Sometimes called vascular dementia, this type is caused by blood clots in the small blood vessels of the brain. When the clots cut off the blood supply to the brain tissue, the brain cells are damaged and may die. (An infarct is an area of dead tissue caused by obstruction of the circulation.)
      Lewy body dementia. Lewy bodies are areas of injury found on damaged nerve cells in certain parts of the brain. They are associated with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, but researchers do not yet know whether dementia with Lewy bodies is a distinct type of dementia or a variation of Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease.
      Dementia related to alcoholism or exposure to heavy metals (arsenic, antimony, bismuth).
      Dementia related to infectious diseases. These infections may be caused by viruses (HIV, viral encephalitis); spirochetes (Lyme disease, syphilis); or prions (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). Spirochetes are certain kinds of bacteria, and prions are protein particles that lack nucleic acid.
      Dementia related to abnormalities in the structure of the brain. These may include a buildup of spinal fluid in the brain (hydrocephalus); tumors; or blood collecting beneath the membrane that covers the brain (subdural hematoma).
      Dementia may also be associated with depression, low levels of thyroid hormone, or niacin or vitamin B 12deficiency. Dementia related to these conditions is often reversible.

      Genetic factors in dementia
      Genetic factors play a role in several types of dementia, but the importance of these factors in the development of the dementia varies considerably. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is known, for example, to have an autosomal (non-sex-related) dominant pattern in most early-onset cases as well as in some late-onset cases, and to show different degrees of penetrance (frequency of expression) in late-life cases. Moreover, researchers have not yet discovered how the genes associated with dementia interact with other risk factors to produce or trigger the dementia. One non-genetic risk factor presently being investigated is toxic substances in the environment.

      EARLY-ONSET ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.In early-onset AD, which accounts for 2%- 7% of cases of AD, the symptoms develop before age 60. It is usually caused by an inherited genetic mutation. Early-onset AD is also associated with Down syndrome, in that persons with trisomy 21 (three forms of human chromosome 21 instead of a pair) often develop early-onset AD.

      LATE-ONSET ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.Recent research indicates that late-onset Alzheimer's disease is a polygenic disorder; that is, its development is influenced by more than one gene. It has been known since 1993 that a specific form of a gene (the APOE gene) on human chromosome 19 is a genetic risk factor for late-onset AD. In 1998 researchers at the University of Pittsburgh reported on another gene that controls the production of bleomycin hydrolase (BH) as a second genetic risk factor that acts independently of the APOE gene. In December 2000, three separate research studies reported that a gene on chromosome 10 that may affect the processing of a protein (called amyloid-beta protein) is also involved in the development of late-onset AD. When this protein is not properly broken down, a starchy substance builds up in the brains of people with AD to form the plaques that are characteristic of the disease.

      MULTI-INFARCT DEMENTIA (MID).While the chief risk factors for MID are high blood pressure, advanced age, and male sex, there is an inherited form of MID called CADASIL, which stands for cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy. CADASIL can cause psychiatric disturbances and severe headaches as well as dementia.

      FRONTAL LOBE DEMENTIAS.Researchers think that between 25% and 50% of cases of frontal lobe dementia involve genetic factors. Pick's dementia appears to have a much smaller genetic component than FLD. It is not yet known what other risk factors combine with inherited traits to influence the development of frontal lobe dementias.
      Treatments
      Reversible and responsive dementias
      Some types of dementia are reversible, and a few types respond to specific treatments related to their causes. Dementia related to dietary deficiencies or metabolic disorders is treated with the appropriate vitamins or thyroid medication. Dementia related to HIV infection often responds well to zidovudine (Retrovir), a drug given to prevent the AIDS virus from replicating. Multi-infarct dementia is usually treated by controlling the patient's blood pressure and/or diabetes; while treatments for these disorders cannot undo damage already caused to brain tissue, they can slow the progress of the dementia. Patients with alcohol-related dementia often improve over the long term if they are able to stop drinking. Dementias related to head injuries, hydrocephalus, and tumors are treated by surgery.

      It is important to evaluate and treat elderly patients for depression, because the symptoms of depression in older people often mimic dementia. This condition is sometimes called pseudodementia. In addition, patients who suffer from both depression and dementia often show some improvement in intellectual functioning when the depression is treated. The medications most often used for depression related to dementia are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) paroxetineand sertraline. The mental status examination should be repeated after six- 12 weeks of antidepressant medication.

      Irreversible dementias
      As of 2001, there are no medications or surgical techniques that can cure Alzheimer's disease, the frontal lobe dementias, MID, or dementia with Lewy bodies. There are also no "magic bullets" that can slow or stop the progression of these dementias. There is, however, one medication, Aricept, that is being used to halt the progression of Alzheimer's disease. In addition, another medication called galantamine(Reminyl) is also being used to treat the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. Patients may be given medications to ease the depression, anxiety, sleep disturbances, and other behavioral symptoms that accompany dementia, but most physicians prescribe relatively mild dosages in order to minimize the troublesome side effects of these drugs. Dementia with Lewy bodies appears to respond better to treatment with the newer antipsychotic medications than to treatment with such older drugs as haloperidol(Haldol).

      Patients in the early stages of dementia can often remain at home with some help from family members or other caregivers, especially if the house or apartment can be fitted with safety features (handrails, good lighting, locks for cabinets containing potentially dangerous products, nonslip treads on stairs, etc.). Patients in the later stages of dementia, however, usually require skilled care in a nursing home or hospital.

      Prognosis
      The prognosis for reversible dementia related to nutritional or thyroid problems is usually good once the cause has been identified and treated. The prognoses for dementias related to alcoholism or HIV infection depend on the patient's age and the severity of the underlying disorder.

      The prognosis for the irreversible dementias is gradual deterioration of the patient's functioning ending in death. The length of time varies somewhat. Patients with Alzheimer's disease may live from two- 20 years with the disease, with an average of seven years. Patients with frontal lobe dementia or Pick's disease live on average between five and 10 years after diagnosis. The course of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is much more rapid, with patients living between five and 12 months after diagnosis.

      Prevention
      The reversible dementias related to thyroid and nutritional disorders can be prevented in many cases by regular physical checkups and proper attention to diet. Dementias related to toxic substances in the workplace may be prevented by careful monitoring of the work environment and by substituting less hazardous materials or substances in manufacturing processes. Dementias caused by infectious diseases are theoretically preventable by avoiding exposure to the prion, spirochete, or other disease agent. Multi-infarct dementia may be preventable in some patients by attention to diet and monitoring of blood pressure. Dementias caused by abnormalities in the structure of the brain are not preventable as of 2002.

      With regard to genetic factors, tests are now available for the APOE gene implicated in late-onset Alzheimer's, but these tests are used primarily in research instead of clinical practice. One reason is that the test results are not conclusive; about 20% of people who eventually develop AD do not carry this gene. Another important reason is the ethical implications of testing for a disease that presently has no cure. These considerations may change, however, if researchers discover better treatments for primary dementia, more effective preventive methods, or more reliable genetic markers.

  3. QUESTION:
    If i got a blood test for my Thyroid would they find anything else wrong?
    I got my results saying everything is ok with my thyroid. I have some of the symptoms of like Low blood sugar it said on a website like in schoool before lunch i get super uncomfortable and feel like im going to throw up because i get so hungry after i just ate a snack would they have proabably caught that too?

    • ANSWER:
      The clinicians doing blood tests only test for whatever the Doctor requested. With the Thyroid function tests, they usually just ask for T.S.H and Free T4 to ascertain whether your thyroid is producing thyroxine (T4). If that reading falls within a fairly broad band they say your thyroid is okay. Not necessarily so! What may be okay for one person might be all wrong for another. Plus, if your body cannot convert its T4 into triiodothyronine (T3), your metabolism will run amuck and that could account for feeling dreadfully shaky and needing to eat. That's because the thyroid goes in fits and starts when its not working properly. It fails to produce enough T4 or to convert that into T3, and your metabolism is sluggish. Then the thyroid makes a big effort to counterbalance that by producing more T4, often making you shaky/tremulous, but after a bit it lapses into exhaustion (so to speak) and levels drop.

      This means that your thyroid function test only gives a snapshot of what state your thyroid hormones were in at the moment of drawing the blood! A day earlier and your T4 level could have been way too high. A day later and your T4 level could have been alarmingly low. The standard test is almost worse than useless. You need a Total T3 test but trying to get Doctors to do that is like extracting teeth with plyers.

      A lady called Gayle Coyler took 2 years to be diagnosed with underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) but then 10 years to convince doctors that she had been prescribed the wrong medication! She put on nearly 5 stone in weight between 2001 and 2002, was constantly tired and couldn't concentrate. Being put on synthetic thyroxine did not help - she turned out to one of a small number of people who need natural thyroxine. After going on it she'd lost more than 2 stone in 2 months and she felt like a new person. Her story was in the health section of the Daily Mail newspaper on 3 July 2011. She got help via http://www.tpa-uk.org.uk

      If you need a blood test to see what your blood sugar levels are, you need to do a fasting test; you don't eat or drink anything (except water) for 12 hours prior to getting that blood test.

  4. QUESTION:
    What are the chances this is something serious?
    I am a 14 y.o. girl and i have Hoshimoto's disease. ive been taking medication almost as long as i can remember for it and i go in for my annual checkup. today i went and she found a nodule on my thyroid and im freaked out..what if its serious and its cancer? what are the chances that it is?
    PS. a month ago i had an achy feeling in my throid and iver summer i play lacrosse and i got hit in the throat with the ball really hard.

    • ANSWER:
      Catching a lacrosse ball in the throat had to have hurt big time. I got hit with a lacrosse ball near the top of my thigh once. I was lame for days. I would have had to go to the doctor, but Dad was a sports trainer and knew what to do. It's likely the bruising to your thyroid has caused a small nodule.

      From the Mayo clinic.

      Complications
      By Mayo Clinic staff

      Left untreated, an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) caused by Hashimoto's disease can lead to a number of health problems:

      Goiter. Constant stimulation of your thyroid to release more hormones may cause the gland to become enlarged, a condition known as goiter. Hypothyroidism is one of the most common causes of goiter. Although generally not uncomfortable, a very large goiter can affect your appearance and may interfere with swallowing or breathing.
      Heart problems. Hashimoto's disease also may be associated with an increased risk of heart disease, primarily because high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol — the "bad" cholesterol — can occur in people with an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism). If left untreated, hypothyroidism can lead to an enlarged heart and, in rare cases, heart failure.
      Mental health issues. Depression may occur early in Hashimoto's disease and may become more severe over time. Hashimoto's disease can also cause sexual desire (libido) to decrease in both men and women and can lead to slowed mental functioning.
      Myxedema (mik-suh-DEE-muh). This rare, life-threatening condition can develop due to long-term hypothyroidism as a result of untreated Hashimoto's disease. Its signs and symptoms include intense cold intolerance and drowsiness followed by profound lethargy and unconsciousness. A myxedema coma may be triggered by sedatives, infection or other stress on your body. Myxedema requires immediate emergency medical treatment.
      Birth defects. Babies born to women with untreated hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto's disease may have a higher risk of birth defects than do babies born to healthy mothers. Doctors have long known that these children are more prone to intellectual and developmental problems. There may be a link between hypothyroid pregnancies and birth defects, such as cleft palate. A connection also exists between hypothyroid pregnancies and heart, brain and kidney problems in infants. If you're planning to get pregnant or if you're in early pregnancy, be sure to have your thyroid level checked.

      Nowhere does it reference a link between Hashimoto's disease and thyroid cancer.

  5. QUESTION:
    How can I make sure I am getting enough circulation in my feet?
    Sometimes I get cramps in my legs and the tips of my toes hurt.

    • ANSWER:
      Causes:

      A common cause of poor leg circulation – restricted blood flow to your legs – is peripheral vascular disease, or PVD. This term refers to disorders involving blood vessels outside, or on the periphery, of the heart. PVD can involve peripheral arteries (blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart) or peripheral veins (blood vessels that carry blood toward the heart).

      When PVD involves the arteries, it is known as peripheral artery disease, or PAD. A fatty substance called plaque builds up and hardens on the walls of the peripheral arteries, making it difficult for blood to properly flow through. The plaque takes years to build up, which is why older adults are more at risk.

      In addition, the following behaviors or conditions can also contribute to leg circulation problems:

      * Tobacco smoking
      * Obesity
      * Lack of exercise
      * Improper diet
      * High blood pressure
      * High cholesterol
      * Diabetes
      * Certain nerve and thyroid conditions
      * Pregnancy
      * Long periods of sitting in a cramped and immobile position (Economy Class Syndrome)

      Symptoms:

      If you have poor leg circulation, symptoms usually develop gradually.

      * In the early stages, you may experience cramping or fatigue in the legs, buttocks or feet during activity. The pain, whether it’s leg pain, lower leg pain or foot pain, usually diminishes with rest, but will reoccur.
      * You may complain of a tired, aching feet, or swollen feet/legs.
      * You may also have cramping that occurs in your legs and feet when you are sleeping or immobile for extended periods of time.
      * In addition, you can incur such symptoms as ‘cold feet,’ or feet that ‘fall asleep.’

      Frequent suffering with cold feet and/or cold hands usually signifies that your circulation, or blood flow from your heart, has slowed. This may especially happen at night when you are trying to sleep, during periods of immobility or after eating certain foods.

      People who have very poor leg circulation may also develop a blood clot, a sudden blockage in blood that can cause severe leg pain. This blood clot, known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), develops in a deep vein, and can occur when a vein is damaged or if blood flow slows down or stops completely. If you’re obese and/or over age 40, you’re at particular risk for DVT.

      Relief and Prevention:

      Good circulation ensures that your body can stay healthy, heal well, and properly function during daily activities.

      The most important treatment for poor leg circulation is to address the risk factors:

      * Avoid cigarette smoking.
      * Keep your blood pressure under control.
      * Keep your cholesterol levels in the healthy range.
      * Exercise on a regular and frequent basis.
      * Consider special exercise equipment, products and shoe wear that promotes circulation, such as a bed wedge or leg wedge.
      * Keep moving – avoid staying immobile for long periods of time.
      * Keep your feet and extremities warm.
      * Wear graduated compression hosiery and socks that help stimulate circulation.

      The Podiatry Institute suggests that you always see your physician if you suspect you have poor leg circulation, as the condition can be serious and an indication of another medical problem. Medications are available to treat leg circulation problems and to help prevent more serious consequences.

  6. QUESTION:
    What would cause a indoor cat to loose weight rapidly & have weazing sounds when breathing with a dry cough ?
    She is 7 years old now... and this started a few weeks ago!

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry bro. Looks like poor little pussy is going to have to see the guy in the white coat.
      These might be some possibilities:

      1. Cat Hyperthyroidism
      The thyroid is a gland that secretes hormones that regulate the metabolic process, helping the growth process and the normal development of a cat.

      If the thyroid gland is hyperactive, the cat has hyperthyroidism. She'll have an increased heart rate and an unbalanced metabolic process, resulting in weight loss. Hyperthyroidism often goes hand in hand with kidney disease. Hyperthyroidism can be treated by removing the thyroid. You can also opt for drugs that will inhibit the thyroid.

      2. Cat Diabetes
      Diabetes may cause weight loss. Diabetes is caused by the improper function of the endocrine gland. Diabetes type I occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin. Diabetes type II occurs the body does not react properly to the insulin.

      In type 1 diabetes, insulin insufficiency means cells don't receive sufficient energy from carbohydrates so, in order to obtain the needed energy, they break down fat.

      Diabetes can be managed by administering insulin shots on a daily basis.

      3. Cat Cancer
      Cat cancer may be of several types: blood cancer, bone cancer or tumors located in different parts of the body. The cancerous cells will attack the body and will cause weight loss, anemia and vomiting. Cancer treatment options are more effective if it's detected in a timely manner, so if your cat loses weight suddenly, go for a check-up.

      4. Pregnancy
      Pregnancy may also be a cause for weight loss. In the earlier stages of pregnancy, the cat experiences symptoms like lack of appetite and vomiting. The weight loss may be visible, however it is not a cause for worry. She'll soon gain more weight. During lactation the cat may also lose some weight.

      5. Irritable Bowel Disease
      Irritable bowel diseases are caused by inflammatory cells that infiltrate the upper or lower intestinal tract. The gastrointestinal tract mucosa will be attacked by the white blood cells or plasma cells and cause irritation, resulting in chronic diarrhea and vomiting.

      IBD is caused by bacteria, food allergies or genetic predisposition. IBD can be treated after the cause of the irritation is detected. A special diet will be prescribed.

      6. Dental Problems
      Dental problems are very painful for cats. They will avoid eating to keep away from the pain. Examine your cat's mouth to see if you can spot any infections or a bad tooth. Keep proper mouth hygiene and wash your cat's teeth to avoid gum disease and cavities.

      7. Insufficient Food Intake
      If your cat's diet does not contain the right nutrients or is insufficient, the cat will lose weight. Make sure your cat gets enough amounts of food that are rich in protein, fatty acids and even include some vitamin supplements, in case your cat lacks appetite.

      Oh well. Sorry. Hey look, I tried? Take him to the vet anyway. I am only STUDYING to be a vet. But it might also be allergies.

  7. QUESTION:
    How do you get an increased workload as a cause of death?
    I'm being honest and trying to be specific in my life.
    I know the definition of enlarged heart, but I mean it, what makes you get that cause?

    • ANSWER:
      An enlarged heart can be caused by conditions that cause your heart to pump harder than usual or that damage your heart muscle. Sometimes the heart enlarges and becomes weak for unknown reasons (idiopathic).

      Conditions associated with an enlarged heart include:

      High blood pressure. Having high blood pressure can make it so that your heart has to pump harder to deliver blood to the rest of your body, enlarging and thickening the muscle.

      Heart valve disease. Four valves within your heart keep blood flowing in the right direction. If the valves are damaged by such conditions as rheumatic fever, a heart defect, infections (infectious endocarditis), connective tissue disorders, certain medications or radiation treatments for cancer, your heart may enlarge.

      Disease of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy). Cardiomyopathy is the thickening and stiffening of heart muscle. In early stages of cardiomyopathy, you may have no symptoms. As the condition worsens, your heart may enlarge to try to pump more blood to your body.

      Heart attack. Damage done during a heart attack may cause an enlarged heart.
      A heart condition you're born with (congenital heart defect). Many types of congenital heart defects may lead to an enlarged heart, as defects can affect blood flow through the heart, forcing it to pump harder.

      Abnormal heartbeat (arrhythmia). If you have an arrhythmia, your heart may not pump blood as effectively as it would if your heart rhythm were normal. The extra work your heart has to do to pump blood to your body may cause it to enlarge.

      High blood pressure in the artery connecting your heart and lungs (pulmonary hypertension). If you have pulmonary hypertension, your heart may need to pump harder to move blood between your lungs and your heart. As a result, the right side of your heart may enlarge.

      Low red blood cell count (anemia). Anemia is a condition in which there aren't enough healthy red blood cells to carry adequate oxygen to your tissues. Left untreated, chronic anemia can lead to a rapid or irregular heartbeat. Your heart must pump more blood to make up for the lack of oxygen in the blood when you're anemic. Rarely, your heart can enlarge if you have anemia for a long time and you don't seek treatment.

      Thyroid disorders. Both an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) and an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism) can lead to heart problems, including an enlarged heart.

      Excessive iron in the body (hemochromatosis). Hemochromatosis is a disorder in which your body doesn't properly metabolize iron, causing it to build up in various organs, including your heart muscle. This can cause an enlarged left ventricle due to weakening of the heart muscle.

      Rare diseases that can affect your heart, such as amyloidosis. Amyloidosis is a condition in which abnormal proteins circulate in the blood and may be deposited in the heart, interfering with your heart's function. If amyloid builds up in your heart, it can cause it to enlarge.

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/enlarged-heart/DS01129/DSECTION=causes

  8. QUESTION:
    What are the other reasons for light period?
    Okay so I had sex with my boyfriend last april 11 and after a few hours i got my period. May 9 i had light period. I do not think i am pregnant, is it because of stress or something? Do anybody know why is it like that? Thank you
    And yes we had protection when we did it.

    • ANSWER:
      Causes

      Both internal as well as external factors can trigger light periods in women. Some of the most commonly found reasons are explained here:

      Hormonal Imbalance
      One of the most prevalent causes of a light period is hormonal imbalance where the woman's body start producing excess amounts of the male hormone testosterone and less amount of the female hormones estrogen. Lack of sufficient estrogen tends to thin up the lining of the uterus which results in lighter menstrual flow.

      Menopause
      During menopause, the ovaries do not produce enough reproductive hormones like estrogen and progesterone and create a hormonal imbalance. As a result, menstrual flow decreases over a period of time before it comes to a complete halt. During this phase, menopausal women experience lighter period than usual and it is absolutely normal.

      Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)
      In this condition, small cysts are formed inside the ovaries and this causes various menstrual abnormalities. In some months a woman may get heavy bleeding during period and in others it will be a lighter flow. They may even miss periods in some months. Such irregularities of period are accompanied by pelvic pain and nausea.

      Birth Control Pills
      If you are getting lighter periods after starting a new birth control pill, then it could be that pill responsible for that condition. The hormone present in these pills tends to bring about some changes in your body. As a result, the duration of the menstrual cycle and the blood flow during periods may decrease within the first few months.

      Pregnancy
      Yes, the possibility of pregnancy cannot be ruled out. When you get a light period all of a sudden and there are some early pregnancy symptoms like morning sickness, take a pregnancy test as soon as possible. Even though it is rare but there are some women who get light menstrual spotting in their first month of pregnancy.

      Stress
      Mental stress often has an adverse effect on the menstruation. If you are under a lot of stress, just before the onset of your monthly period, it is likely that you get a light period. This is because your body assumes it is an emergency and diverts the blood flow to the brain, lungs and other vital organs of the body to ensure normal body functioning. Once the stress levels go down, normal flow of period is restored.

      Excessive Physical Exertion
      Women athletes are prone to lighter periods because of their rigorous physical training sessions. When their physical activities are less intense, the menstrual flow usually returns to normal. Non athlete women may get lighter period after too much of exercising or traveling.

      Other Reasons
      Young girls and women who eat less to maintain a low body weight often get light periods. This happens because the lack of nutrition and low body weight affect production of hormones in the body. Those women who are suffering from chronic health problems such as diabetes or osteoporosis can have this kind of problem. It can be triggered by thyroid problems or as a side effect of certain medicines.

      Diagnosis and Treatment

      If you get it once in a while, then you may not require any treatment. However, other cases, require thorough investigation by your gynecologist. They conduct physical examination, blood test and Pap test to ascertain the cause. They may also conduct a pregnancy test, if required. Your lifestyle and medical history is also taken into account. The treatment then depends on the reasons for light periods. Change in diet and lifestyle is recommended in most cases. Stress reduction is also important to keep the menstrual flow normal. When strenuous physical activities causes this problem, the doctor may suggest you to cut down on your training sessions. Ovarian cysts are often treated with birth control pills and other medicines containing synthetic hormones. Women who have high levels of testosterone may have to undergo androgen therapy.

      If you suspect that something is wrong, there's no need to press the panic button unnecessarily. Visit a gynecologist for check up. Conditions that lead to light periods are treatable and are not always an indication of some major gynecological problem. However, to avoid any further complications, it is best to seek medical help as soon as you sense something is wrong.

  9. QUESTION:
    Can Cortisol levels be normal in Adrenal Fatigue?
    I have every symptom of AF. My Aldosterone, Progesterone, Estrogen, DHEA, and Testosterone are all in the dirt, yet my AM blood Cortisol was normal. I'm doing a Saliva Test next week, but how can this Blood Cortisol Level be Normal ?

    • ANSWER:
      I had severe adrenal fatigue last year and passed the adrenal fatigue tests with flying colours!...even my prolactin was high from stress. I know doctors are 100% wrong when they say adrenal fatigue doesn't exist and recently found an article to explain why they make this statement>>>>

      http://www.medical-library.net/adrenal_fatigue_info.html

      "Medical thinking has polarized on the subject of adrenal function, so that, in the minds of most doctors, a person is either in a normal condition or has Addison’s Disease (complete adrenal failure) with no possibility for middle ground. This polarization came about in the early days of treatment with adrenal steroids, the 1950s, when cortisone and hydrocortisone became available. Doctors did not know the proper dosages, guessed too high, got serious side effects and became phobic about the use of adrenal steroids. To allay their fears of disaster, they created a kind of myth that patients were only allowed to have complete failure of the adrenals or nothing at all. If this were the case, and a person shows up with complete failure of the adrenals (Addison’s Disease), naturally the only thing to do would be to treat with adrenal steroids. If failure is not complete, the patient is defined as “normal” and not treatable. In this manner, the fear of being sued for inducing the side effects associated with abnormally large doses of, for example, cortisone is taken away by the fact that no one receives this therapy except the patient who has complete adrenal failure. In that strange world, it is better to have complete adrenal failure than to have partial adrenal failure — because in that case a person at least receives treatment."

      There are easy home tests to diagnose adrenal fatigue. This link has the basic three tests>>>http://forum.lowcarber.org/showthread.php?t=117152

      Test #1: Iris Contraction Test
      Test #2: Blood Pressure Test
      Test #3: Sergent's White Line

      This link is excellent to explain the tests in more detail>>>
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/adrenal-info/

      "EVEN MORE CONCLUSIVE: a 24 hour adrenal saliva test. Doctors tend to recommend a one-time blood test, or an ACTH STIMULATION test, or a 24 hour urine test, but patients have found none to be adequate or complete measures to discern sluggish adrenals. The ACTH STIM will tell you how much stimulation your adrenals are getting, but not how much cortisol they are producing. Granted, the ACTH can be valuable if there is suspicion of a pituitary dysfunction. But we have noted that most patients with adrenal fatigue have healthy ACTH stimulation. A blood test will only discern cortisol at one time of the day, failing to tell you what goes on at other times. A urine test simply gives you an average of a 24 hour period, and that masks being high one time, and low another, which are important clues to sluggish adrenals.

      Instead, we have relied on the 24 hour adrenal saliva test, which tests your cortisol levels at four key times in a 24 hour day and allows you to view your daily cyclic adrenal function. (And note that if you are very hypothyroid, you readings may actually be even lower than your saliva results will show, since being hypothyroid results in a slower clearance of cortisol from your body.)

      Healthy, well-functioning adrenals will have the morning result at the tip top of the range; the noon result will be near the top; the late afternoon will be mid-or-lower, and the evening should be at the bottom."

      Adrenal fatigue is very common with a thyroid imbalance. >>>

      "Additionally, the extreme majority of doctors fail to heed the warning even on thyroxine inserts: to test your cortisol levels. Low cortisol, aka adrenal insufficiency, is a common occurrence with hypothyroid patients, especially considering the long years you are left undiagnosed due to a faulty TSH, or being put on T4 meds which result in lingering hypothyroidism and stress on the adrenals."

      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/adrenal-info/
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/t4-only-meds-dont-work/

  10. QUESTION:
    How do you know if your depressed?
    Everything makes me mad, i can't sleep at night, i have no appetite, i hate being around other people, and noises and sounds trigger my anger quickly.

    • ANSWER:
      The only real way to find out if you are really depressed is by going to a doctor and being diagnosed. But you do have symptoms of depresson. I'm slowly getting over depression and I can't sleep for more than 5 hours a night, only eat when I'm starving, I cry a lot and I feel like there's no hope.
      Those are just my symptoms; According to Mayo Clinic, these are their symptoms:
      ■Feelings of sadness or unhappiness
      ■Irritability or frustration, even over small matters
      ■Loss of interest or pleasure in normal activities
      ■Reduced sex drive
      ■Insomnia or excessive sleeping
      ■Changes in appetite — depression often causes decreased appetite and weight loss, but in some people it causes increased cravings for food and weight gain
      ■Agitation or restlessness — for example, pacing, hand-wringing or an inability to sit still
      ■Slowed thinking, speaking or body movements
      ■Indecisiveness, distractibility and decreased concentration
      ■Fatigue, tiredness and loss of energy — even small tasks may seem to require a lot of effort
      ■Feelings of worthlessness or guilt, fixating on past failures or blaming yourself when things aren't going right
      ■Trouble thinking, concentrating, making decisions and remembering things
      ■Frequent thoughts of death, dying or suicide
      ■Crying spells for no apparent reason
      ■Unexplained physical problems, such as back pain or headaches
      For some people, depression symptoms are so severe that it's obvious something isn't right. Others people feel generally miserable or unhappy without really knowing why.

      Depression affects each person in different ways, so depression symptoms vary from person to person. Inherited traits, age, gender and cultural background all play a role in how depression may affect you.

      The causes could be:
      ■Biological differences. People with depression appear to have physical changes in their brains. The significance of these changes is still uncertain but may eventually help pinpoint causes.
      ■Neurotransmitters. These naturally occurring brain chemicals linked to mood are thought to play a direct role in depression.
      ■Hormones. Changes in the body's balance of hormones may be involved in causing or triggering depression. Hormone changes can result from thyroid problems, menopause and a number of other conditions.
      ■Inherited traits. Depression is more common in people whose biological family members also have the condition. Researchers are trying to find genes that may be involved in causing depression.
      ■Life events. Events such as the death or loss of a loved one, financial problems and high stress can trigger depression in some people.
      ■Early childhood trauma. Traumatic events during childhood, such as abuse or loss of a parent, may cause permanent changes in the brain that make you more susceptible to depression.

      And maybe, because you said everything makes you mad you might have Bi Polar Disorder.
      Symptoms of Bi-Polar are:
      ■Bipolar I disorder. Mood swings with bipolar I cause significant difficulty in your job, school or relationships. Manic episodes can be severe and dangerous.
      ■Bipolar II disorder. Bipolar II is less severe than bipolar I. You may have an elevated mood, irritability and some changes in your functioning, but generally you can carry on with your normal daily routine. Instead of full-blown mania, you have hypomania — a less severe form of mania. In bipolar II, periods of depression typically last longer than periods of hypomania.
      ■Cyclothymia. Cyclothymia is a mild form of bipolar disorder. With cyclothymia, hypomania and depression can be disruptive, but the highs and lows are not as severe as they are with other types of bipolar disorder.

      Bipolar disorder symptoms reflect a range of moods.
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      The exact symptoms of bipolar disorder vary from person to person. For some people, depression causes the most problems; for other people manic symptoms are the main concern. Symptoms of depression and symptoms of mania or hypomania may also occur together. This is known as a mixed episode.

      Manic phase of bipolar disorder
      Signs and symptoms of the manic or hypomanic phase of bipolar disorder can include:

      ■Euphoria
      ■Extreme optimism
      ■Inflated self-esteem
      ■Poor judgment
      ■Rapid speech
      ■Racing thoughts
      ■Aggressive behavior
      ■Agitation or irritation
      ■Increased physical activity
      ■Risky behavior
      ■Spending sprees or unwise financial choices
      ■Increased drive to perform or achieve goals
      ■Increased sex drive
      ■Decreased need for sleep
      ■Inability to concentrate
      ■Careless or dangerous use of drugs or alcohol
      ■Frequent absences from work or school
      ■Delusions or a break from reality (psychosis)
      ■Poor performance at work or school
      Depressive phase of bipolar disorder
      Signs and symptoms of the depressive phase of bipolar disorder can include:

      ■Sadness
      ■Hopelessness
      ■Suicidal thoughts or behavior
      ■Anxiety
      ■Guilt
      ■Sleep problems
      ■Low appetite o

  11. QUESTION:
    What are some remedies for insomnia?
    I am not sleeping much these days. I average one good night of rest per week(seven hours). This is wreaking havoc on my health. Most of the time I only get 3-4 hours per night. I am up late and then I wake up early every day. It is wrecking havoc on my health and my life. I was dating a girl, and my lack of sleep and energy, is now effecting our relationship poorly. What in the hell can I do? I gotta go to a job, and function in life and stuff. The girlfriend is a luxury, but I do have to retain employment, and be functional in society. I can't walk around like a zombie all the time. Anyone know some good remedies for insomnia? Im starting to lose muscle mass from this crap, and my immune system is suffering too. I need help.

    • ANSWER:
      In order to properly treat and cure your insomnia, you need to become a sleep detective. Emotional issues such as stress, anxiety, and depression cause half of all insomnia cases. But your daytime habits, sleep routine, and physical health may also play a role. Try to identify all possible causes of your insomnia. Once you figure out the root cause, you can tailor treatment accordingly.

      Are you under a lot of stress?
      Are you depressed or feel emotionally flat or hopeless?
      Do you struggle with chronic feelings of anxiety or worry?
      Have you recently gone through a traumatic experience?
      Are you taking any medications that might be affecting your sleep?
      Do you have any health problems that may be interfering with sleep?
      Is your sleep environment quiet and comfortable?
      Are you spending enough time in sunlight during the day and in darkness at night?
      Do you try to go to bed and get up around the same time every day?
      Psychological problems that can cause insomnia: depression, anxiety, chronic stress, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder.
      Medications that can cause insomnia: antidepressants; cold and flu medications that contain alcohol; pain relievers that contain caffeine (Midol, Excedrin); diuretics, corticosteroids, thyroid hormone, high blood pressure medications.
      Medical problems that can cause insomnia: asthma, allergies, Parkinson’s disease, hyperthyroidism, acid reflux, kidney disease, cancer, chronic pain.
      Sleep disorders that can cause insomnia: sleep apnea, narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome.
      Some habits are so ingrained that you may overlook them as a possible contributor to your insomnia. Maybe your daily Starbucks habit affects your sleep more than you realize. Or maybe you’ve never made the connection between your late-night TV viewing or Internet surfing and your sleep difficulties. Keeping a sleep diary is a helpful way to pinpoint habits and behaviors contributing to your insomnia. All you have to do is jot down daily details about your daytime habits, sleep routine, and insomnia symptoms. For example, you can keep track of when you go to sleep and when you wake up, where you fall asleep, what you eat and drink, and any stressful events that occur during the day. Make sure your bedroom is quiet, dark, and cool. Noise, light, and heat can interfere with sleep. Try using a sound machine or earplugs to hide outside noise, an open window or fan to keep the room cool, and blackout curtains or a sleep mask to block out light.
      Stick to a regular sleep schedule. Support your biological clock by going to bed and getting up at the same time every day, including weekends. Get up at your usual time in the morning even if you’re tired. This will help you get back in a regular sleep rhythm.
      Avoid naps. Napping during the day can make it more difficult to sleep at night. If you feel like you have to take a nap, limit it to 30 minutes before 3 p.m.
      Avoid stimulating activity and stressful situations before bedtime. This includes vigorous exercise; big discussions or arguments; and TV, computer, or video game use.
      Limit caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine. Stop drinking caffeinated beverages at least eight hours before bed. Avoid drinking alcohol in the evening; while alcohol can make you feel sleepy, it interferes with the quality of your sleep. Quit smoking or avoid it at night, as nicotine is a stimulant. Increase light exposure during the day. Take breaks outside in sunlight, remove sunglasses when it’s safe to do so, and open blinds and curtains during the day.
      Limit artificial light at night. To boost melatonin production, use low-wattage bulbs, cover windows and electrical displays in your bedroom, avoid bright light and turn off television and computer screens at least one hour before bed. If you can’t make your bedroom dark enough, try using a sleep mask.Use the bedroom only for sleeping and sex. Don’t work, read, watch TV, or use your computer in bed or the bedroom. The goal is to associate the bedroom with sleep and sex, so that when you get in bed your brain and body get a strong signal that it’s time to nod off or be romantic.
      Get out of bed when you can’t sleep. Don’t try to force yourself to sleep. Tossing and turning only amps up the anxiety. Get up, leave the bedroom, and do something relaxing, such as reading, drinking a warm cup of caffeine-free tea, taking a bath, or listening to soothing music. When you’re sleepy, go back to bed.
      Move bedroom clocks out of view. Anxiously watching the minutes tick by when you can’t sleep—knowing that you’re going to be exhausted when the alarm goes off—is a surefire recipe for insomnia. You can use an alarm, but make sure you can’t see the time when you’re in bed. A variety of relaxation techniques help you achieve the relaxation response, including:

      deep breathing
      progressive muscle relaxation
      meditation
      visualization
      yoga
      tai chi

  12. QUESTION:
    Why is my Bearded Dragon being lazy and twitching allot?
    It is about 4-5 months old. and isn't eating or pooping at all. it is twitching allot and sleeping all the time. sometimes it has these spazz attacks and like is twitching everywhere on its body even its mouth. i am worried really bad and want the best advice of what i should do too help it plz help.
    ~tay and selzar.

    • ANSWER:
      Most likely it's a calcium deficiency. Here is the text of an article I am working on for my website that will explain everything to you in great detail. This hasn't been published yet, so you'll be the first one to see it, but it is very relevant to your case....

      Introduction

      Calcium deficiency in captive bearded dragons can be a major health concern. If left untreated the condition can lead to death. In the vast majority of cases calcium deficiency is a result of improper husbandry practices. What that means is that it can often be prevented from occurring in the first place. Most keepers know that their bearded dragon needs calcium to keep its bones strong and healthy. What they don’t realize is that calcium plays important roles in proper muscle and neurological function as well.

      While fully understanding the complexities of reptile anatomy and physiology are not required to keep a captive bearded dragon healthy, a basic understanding will show why certain husbandry practices should be followed or avoided as the case may be. At BeardedDragonCareSheet.Org, our goal is to not only help bearded dragon owners know what to do, we want them to understand why they do it. We believe that this type of knowledge makes it much easier to make good choices when it comes to husbandry.

      Symptoms of Calcium Deficiency

      With proper husbandry, the chances of having a calcium deficient reptile drop dramatically. In rare cases, even with proper husbandry a calcium deficiency can develop due to natural causes such as thyroid disease or disease of the intestines. In the early stages of calcium deficiency, nerves and muscles begin to malfunction and may present some of theses symptoms:

      •Jerky or shaky movements of the limbs
      •Tremors
      •Lethargic behavior
      •Anorexia
      •Constipation

      If left untreated and allowed to spread eventually metabolic bone disease (MBD) sets in. MBD will usually result in the slow, painful death of the lizard if not treated. Once MBD has set in and damaged that bones the damage is irreversible. With treatment, the spread may be halted and the MBD may go away but any deformities or damage to the bones is permanent and irreversible. Symptoms of an advanced case include:

      •Bowed legs or other deformities of the bones
      •Soft or swollen jaws
      •Receded lower jaw
      •Broken bones
      •Paralysis of the limbs
      •Inability to support body weight (can’t stand up)

      Calcium Supplements Alone Are Not Enough

      Having been active in several reptile forums and on line communities for many years I have seen countless people ask what’s wrong with their dragon and then go on to list some combinations of symptoms. They are shocked when they find out their dragon most likely has metabolic bone disease (MBD) as a result of calcium deficiency.

      But I dust all his food with calcium powder. How can he have a calcium deficiency?

      Simply providing a source of calcium is not enough. The body must go through a series of processes to be able to use the calcium the dragon consumes. In order for the body to absorb calcium it needs vitamin D3.

      Ok but my calcium supplement contains D3 so why did my dragon get sick?

      The process isn’t quite that simple. Reptiles generally cannot absorb vitamin D when ingested. They must synthesize it within their body. To do this, they must be exposed to UVB light. In the wild dragons get their UVB from the sun. In captivity it is provided by a UVB lamp. When the skin is exposed to UVB, the body produces the natural form of D3 called cholecalciferol. The cholecalciferol enters the blood stream through the liver. From there, it reaches the kidneys and intestines. In the kidneys, it is converted to calcitriol which is a hormone that regulates calcium blood levels. In the intestines, it is converted into a hormone that triggers the release of proteins needed for the absorption of calcium. Without UVB, these processes cannot take place. The nature of this process is what makes a quality UVB source an absolute must for the prevention of MBD.

      Proper Diet

      In order for supplements to be effective they must be part of a varied diet. Dietary needs vary with the age of the dragon. A detailed discussion of those needs is beyond the scope of this article. However, bear in mind that as dragons grow from hatchling to adulthood, the level of protein they need decreases. While many keepers know this, they often do not know the reason why this is important.

      If the diet does not contain enough protein over long periods the body may be unable to absorb calcium because the hormones in the intestines are not able to release enough protein to facilitate calcium absorption. In older dragons a diet that is too high in protein can cause liver and kidney damage. If the liver and kidneys are damaged they may not be able to process vitamin D and therefore the dragon is at risk for calcium deficiency because the body may have trouble completing its natural cycles.

  13. QUESTION:
    What effects can smoking have while you are breast feeding?

    • ANSWER:
      Should a mother who smokes cigarettes breastfeed?
      First of all, a mom who can't stop smoking should breastfeed. Breastfeeding provides many immunities that help your baby fight illness and can even help counteract some of the effects of cigarette smoke on your baby: for example, breastfeeding has been shown to decrease the negative effects of cigarette smoke on a baby's lungs. It's definitely better if breastfeeding moms not smoke, but if you can't stop or cut down, then it is better to smoke and breastfeed than to smoke and formula feed.

      The more cigarettes that you smoke, the greater the health risks for you and your baby. If you can't stop smoking, or don't want to stop smoking, it's safer for your baby if you cut down on the number of cigarettes that you smoke.

      What happens to babies when they are exposed to cigarette smoke?
      Babies and children who are exposed to cigarette smoke have a much higher incidence of pneumonia, asthma, ear infections, bronchitis, sinus infections, eye irritation, and croup.
      Colic occurs more often in babies whose mothers or fathers smoke or if a breastfeeding mother smokes. Researchers believe that not only does the nicotine transferred into mother's milk upset baby but the passive smoke in the home acts as an irritant. Babies of smoking parents fuss more, and mothers who smoke may be less able to cope with a colicky baby (due to lower levels of prolactin).
      Heavy smoking by breastfeeding moms occasionally causes symptoms in the breastfeeding baby such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps and diarrhea.
      Babies of smoking mothers and fathers have a seven times greater chance of dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
      Children of smoking parents have two to three times more visits to the doctor, usually from respiratory infections or allergy-related illnesses.
      Children who are exposed to passive smoke in the home have lower blood levels of HDL, the good cholesterol that helps protect against coronary artery disease.
      Children of smoking parents are more likely to become smokers themselves.
      A recent study found that growing up in a home in which two parents smoked could double the child's risk of lung cancer later in life.

      How does does smoking affect breastfeeding?
      Smoking has been linked to:

      Earlier weaning. One study showed that the heaviest smokers tend to wean the earliest.
      Lower milk production
      Interference with milk let-down
      Lower levels of prolactin. The hormone prolactin must be present for milk synthesis to occur.
      One study (Laurberg 2004) indicated that smoking mothers who live in areas of mild to moderate iodine deficiency have less iodine in their breastmilk (needed for baby's thyroid function) compared to nonsmoking mothers. The study authors suggested that breastfeeding mothers who smoke consider taking an iodine supplement.
      Although smoking has been linked to milk production and let-down problems, this may be related to poor lactation management rather than physiological causes. Dr. Lisa Amir, in a review published in 2001, concluded that "Although there is consistent evidence that women who smoke breastfeed their infants for a shorter duration than non-smokers, the evidence for a physiological mechanism is not strong."

      How to minimize the risk to your baby if you smoke
      The ideal: Stop smoking altogether.
      Cut down. The less you smoke, the smaller the chance that difficulties will arise. The risks increase if you smoke more than 20 cigarettes per day.
      Don't smoke immediately before or during breastfeeding. It will inhibit let-down and is dangerous to your baby.
      Smoke immediately after breastfeeding to cut down on the amount of nicotine in your milk during nursing. Wait as long as possible between smoking and nursing. It takes 95 minutes for half of the nicotine to be eliminated from your body.
      Avoid smoking in the same room with your baby. Even better, smoke outside, away from your baby and other children. Don't allow anyone else to smoke near your baby.

      This article is dedicated to the memory of my mother-in-law, a long-time smoker who died of lung cancer in January 1999.

      Page last modified: 03/04/2006
      Written: 02/03/1999

  14. QUESTION:
    Do you really have Fibromyalgia when Rheumatologists diagnose you with it?
    I have heard from people on the Lupus forums on The Lupus foundation of America forums and from people on here and my dad that Rheumatologists just throw around the word Fibromyalgia when they don't know what the heck is wrong with you and want to just shut you up. Is this all true? I just got blood tested for some Lupus related stuff. I came up with a high sedimentation rate at 48 at the previous Rheumatologist and a high level of c-reactive protein at 7.0 and when the new Rheumatologist tested me I came up with high levels of total complement (ch50) at 63 and high c-reactive protein at 6.7. I found this out early because the PCP ordered some of the same tests and some different tests the day before so I had to go get the tests done at the same time. They mixed the results for the PCP's tests with the Rehumatologists tests and when the PCP requested the test results be faxed over they faxed over all the test results from the PCP and the Rheumatologist mixed together with the name of the Rheumatologists office at the top. So that's how I know the test results before seeing the Rheumatologist. I got a call recently like yesterday from the Rheumatologists office saying there were no signs of Lupus. How the heck is there no signs of Lupus when I came up high for c-reactive protein? What am I supposed to do? Call the doctor out on his crap and say that he is only saying I have Fibromyalgia to shut me up? I am really annoyed they said there is no signs of Lupus. Well whatever it is something is wrong I wouldn't have high levels of total complement (ch50), c-reactive protein, and sedimentation rate for no dang reason. So what's wrong with me? Also I came up with low levels of carbon dioxide at 19.
    Just for everyone else who posts information I am already on Escitalopram/Lexapro which is an antidepressent and have been on it since April of this year and still have extreme pain. So I can safely say it's not depression that's causing it.

    • ANSWER:
      it is real, but it is highly overdiagnosed--most people actually have something else (sometimes they are even diagnosed with something else like Lupus---and the docs will label the pain symptom as fms--which is wrong

      pain and fatigue are signs of Lupus...

      can the c reactive protein indicate something else..

      you have to be diplomatic about it-say you don't understand how the blood test can be positive, but he could be sure it wasn't something like Lupus..

      You CANNOT safely say its not depression based on one medication--many people with depression do not respond to meds at all--and many others have to try many different meds...

      fms is real, but it is actually rare..it is HIGHLY overdiagnosed...i know 4 others that were diagnosed with it--NONE really had it (confirmed that they were misdiagnosed)..most people have something else---some are not physically ill at all.

      even when you supposedly had all the tests (there are hundreds if not thousands of possible tests and docs often miss positive results in tests they do) and even when you have been to multiple so called specialists...most get it wrong...

      doctors have missed a number of things that should have been noticed it tests..severe OA in an xray was missed by 4 doctors over 2 years until I pointed it out...they just kept telling me they didn't see a fracture...there is something seriously wrong with my knee--its been injured 3 times---including swelling..docs keep telling me nothing is wrong....i lost the vision in my left eye due to optic nerve damage when I was 5---went to the eye doctor every year--never noticed --and he came highly recommended--a new doc when I was 13 noticed..the damage was easily seen...last June I had a positive blood test result--doc blew it off..September I started getting sicker...January I couldn't function anymore---i kept researching and found the results were significant--made the appointment with the specialists--and got better 2.5 weeks later after suffering for 6 months because the doc missed an important blood test result..IT HAPPENS ALL THE TIME

      they use fms as a general label for pain...even if they know the pain is due to another condition such as Lymes or MS....or when they are too lazy to put any effort into finding a diagnosis..It is NOT a general label for pain.

      one major issue is hypothyroid or other thyroid issues.....the in range number is too high--people actually have hypothyroid symtpoms at 3.0....but that is supposedly normal.

      there are many other things they miss vitamin d deficiency/iron deficiency anemia, lymes (look up lyme literate MD), ms, chiari malformation, celiac, etc

      FMS is NOT a thyroid issue, cervical spine issue, dehydration...There is NO inflammation with fms. It is NOT due to a vitamin deficiency.

      i deal with it my educating myself and being open to the possibility it is something else---continuing to research any lead--even though I have been to 2 top specialists..and 12 years of research seems to indicate that the diagnosis is correct

      MANY people on here have clearly described a condition other than FMS, but have been diagnosed with it…. even after going to a number of 'experts'
      Source(s):
      personal experience, extensive research, meeting with 2 top respected researchers, participating in research...people who choose to remain ignorant get what they deserve

      OA is localized to my foot and is a result of an injury 10 years after fms symptoms started.
      The knee issue started with an injury 8 YEARS after the fms symptoms and is also a localized issue
      I had EXCELLENT results on thyroid tests for years prior to actually developing the condition…so I can be sure that wasn’t the problem for the previous 30+ years I had fms symptoms. Even though the thyroid is ‘better’ I still have severe fms symptoms…for example, the other day, it was very painful just using my muscles to turn pages…

  15. QUESTION:
    Can anyone help me with depression mybe some tips because it would realy help?

    • ANSWER:
      Everybody gets the blues now and then. Here's the experts' advise on how to dump the slump quickly.

      DEFINING DEPRESSION

      You feel draggy, listless, tried-or, at the other extreme, a little frantic. You sleep fitfully and wake up in the early morning hours. You eat too much or too little. You probably find it hard to concentrate, make decisions, remember things.

      Your sex drive may wane. There may also be some physical distress-headaches, stomach disorders. And, mostbof all, you feel sad-maybe so sad it hurts a little.

      You're emotionally depressed. And you're not alone. The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) note that over a lifetime some 25 percent of us will suffer at least one serious depression; as for mild ones, most of us are familiar with them.

      A depression could however, be due to a glandular problem or result from food allergies or nutritional deficiencies. Since serious depression sap their victims', spoil their days, disrupt thier nights, seem without end and may even bring on suicidal throughts, people with such symptoms shouldn't hesitate to seek professional help.

      This may help you deal with the depressions most of us know, the mild and fairly fleeting ones. Some people say it feels like being shut inside a black box.

      Others say it's like carrying a heavy stones, or having to fight lump-in-the-throat tearfulness all the time. However you might experience it, depression certainly doesn't feel good.

      Though many depressions have an emotional basis, not all do. When a gloomy frame of mind seems to come from nowhere and hangs on like a low-grade fewer, the cause may be physical. Possible physical causes include:

      Hormonal Poblems. Stephen Langer, M.D., a holistic physician practicing in Berkeley, california, says that when patients tell him they're depressed he routinely checks their thyroid and adrenal functions. "Low thyroid function, especially," he says, "is one of the great undiagnosed cause of depression."

      Hypoglycemia. Otherwise known as low blood sugar, it can bring on mood changes such as depression and irritability.

      Vitamin Deficiencies. Studies at McGill University in Montrea have suggested a link between a marginal deficiency of certain B vitamins and emotional depression. Marginal vitamin deficiencies (where you're getting enough of the vitamin to keep going, but not enough to feel your best) are fairly common.

      Dr. Langer says, because of poor diet or stress. Food rich in the B's are whole grains, eggs, fish and green vegetables.

      Many nutritionally oriented doctors suggest taking a B complex supplement daily if you feel your diet is inadequate in these crucial nutrients.

  16. QUESTION:
    What is the importance role of B vitamins in glucose metabolism?

    • ANSWER:
      Thiamine, or vitamin B1, is a water-soluble vitamin in both animal and vegetable origin, which acts as a coenzyme participating in the complex process of conversion of glucose (blood sugar) into energy and is vital in certain metabolic reactions. That's why thiamine is required when there is a high energy consumption, such as when you practice a sport. Thiamine adapts to the needs of the body, assuming it is eaten enough foods containing it. Among the functions of thiamine mention the protection of the heart and nervous system and the formation and maintenance of red blood cells.

      Thiamine deficiency was common until recently un'evenienza quite rare. The cases, however, are growing because of people homeless and malnourished. This weakness is quite common in people who derive most of the energy from sugar or alcohol. The adults are most vulnerable to a shortage of the substance in the presence of heavy drinkers in that age group. The lack of symptoms of intoxication and those are quite similar gait unsteady, his eyes misted, loss of coordination and confusion.

      A mild thiamine deficiency is difficult to diagnose and readily attributed to other issues. The early signs include fatigue, loss of appetite, irritability, emotional instability (antisocial and aggressive behavior) and difficulty concentrating. Symptoms of a chronic shortage average auditory hallucinations and nightmares of various kinds, while the most serious deficiency can lead to psychosis. A thiamine deficiency makes it difficult for the digestion of carbohydrates and leaves too much pyruvic acid in the blood. This causes a lack of oxygen causes loss of mental alertness, labored breathing and heart damage. If this deficiency is not eliminated, manifest confusion and memory loss (the experts study the relationship to Alzheimer's), followed shortly by upset stomach, abdominal pain and constipation. May occur even tingling in the legs, disturbances of sensory nerve fibers and inflammation of the calf muscle. A deficiency can also cause inflammation of the optic nerve. In the absence of thiamine, the function of the central nervous system, which depends on glucose for energy, deteriorates.

      The lack of thiamine can block the metabolism of collagen, directly connected to the healing process. The results of animal studies have shown that healing was much slower in mice deficient in thiamin than those who had normal levels. A thiamine deficiency can lead to problems of coordination and reaction time of the body, coordination between eyes and hands, the motor speed and steadiness of the hands. Cardiac irregularities occur because the shortage also affects the cardiovascular system. The heart muscle may weaken and heart failure may occur. Without adequate doses of thiamine may occur arrhythmias, shortness of breath, sweating feet and legs, hypotension, chest and abdominal pain, kidney failure, heart failure, even to death. The lack of thiamine can interfere with the functioning of the thyroid in an irreversible way. May also occur anorexia (loss of appetite) and gastric atony (loss of muscle tone of the stomach).
      Some researchers believe that a lack of thiamine can be the first link in a chain that leads through the liver and female hormones, cancer of the uterus.

      The thiamine deficiency during alcohol detoxification, can cause paralysis. And 'know that the caffeine in coffee destroys thiamine. That portion of the population most affected by this shortage are homeless, the people malnourished, and those who are fasting and low calorie diets.

  17. QUESTION:
    Is this okay to feed to my cat?
    My cat is pretty old, 12ish i think. But he's really skinny (a common symptom of getting old). He eats his regular food and drinks tons of water. I got this nutri-cal stuff from Pet's Mart and he doesn't seem to like it very much. So I mixed it with some water about a cup of milk and some vanilla extract. Is this okay to feed him?

    • ANSWER:
      Don't feed him anything new without consulting a veterinarian first.

      I would not attribute his low weight to his age alone. Our 16 year old cat (who was just euthanized Monday due to total kidney failure and anemia, etc.) had lost much weight due to his bad kidneys. Four years ago, he was also very skinny (7 lbs.) and when we took him to the vet, we found out he had hyperthyroidism. Within just a few of months of taking his thyroid medicine, he gained a good amount of weight to reach 11 pounds!

      Unfortunately, he gradually lost about a pound a year (perhaps due to his ailing kidneys which did not show up in his regular blood tests until August of this year). In early August, he weighed 8 lbs. at the vet. Then, this past weekend, weighed only 6 lbs (he had not been eating enough - anemia caused lack of appetite, and was also missing for about 28 hours from Wed. to Thur. night and was dehydrated). My cat was not eating enough, but in general, kidney disease can cause weight loss. The kidney function can be improved with a prescribed diet and possibly fluids.

      Please take your cat to the vet and get a Complete Blood Count test to rule out any conditions or diseases he might have. 12 is a great age, but cats can live into their 20s (and a few have lived to 30 and beyond!). If he has kidney issues, he may need the special diet food for his kidneys to function better. If he is peeing a lot, his body may be trying to filter out the excess toxins.

      It is so important to get your cat's bloodwork and urinalysis. You can extend his life many years if you take precautions now. I wish you and your kitty the best of luck, health and happiness.***

  18. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to have an irregular menstrual cycle?
    I am sexually active. I just got my period IM Gessing yesterday and it was a little different. I went to the bathroom and wiped and all i noticed were 3 VERY SMALL clots and that's it. today when i woke up this morning NOTHING. when i went to the bathroo again I saw LIGHT BLEEDING and I am currently wearing a panty liner. This has NEVER HAPPENED before.
    Im 19
    Im 19

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Light Periods

      Both internal as well as external factors can trigger light periods in women. Some of the most commonly found reasons behind light periods are explained here:

      Hormonal Imbalance
      One of the most prevalent causes of light period is hormonal imbalance where the woman's body start producing excess amounts of the male hormone testosterone and less amount of the female hormones estrogen. Lack of sufficient estrogen tends to thin up the lining of the uterus which results in lighter menstrual flow.

      Menopause
      During menopause, the ovaries do not produce enough reproductive hormones like estrogen and progesterone and create a hormonal imbalance. As a result, menstrual flow decreases over a period of time before it comes to a complete halt. During this phase, menopausal women experience lighter period than usual and it is absolutely normal.

      Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)
      In this condition, small cysts are formed inside the ovaries and this causes various menstrual abnormalities. In some months a woman may get heavy bleeding during period and in others it will be a lighter flow. They may even miss periods in some months. Such irregularities of period are accompanied by pelvic pain and nausea.

      Birth Control Pills
      If you are getting lighter periods after starting a new birth control pill, then it could be that pill responsible for that condition. The hormone present in these pills tends to bring about some changes in your body. As a result, the duration of the menstrual cycle and the blood flow during periods may decrease within the first few months.

      Pregnancy
      Yes, the possibility of pregnancy cannot be ruled out. When you get a light period all of a sudden and there are some early pregnancy symptoms like morning sickness, take a pregnancy test as soon as possible. Even though it is rare but there are some women who get light menstrual spotting in their first month of pregnancy.

      Stress
      Mental stress often has an adverse effect on the menstruation. If you are under a lot of stress, just before the onset of your monthly period, it is likely that you get a light period. This is because your body assumes it is an emergency and diverts the blood flow to the brain, lungs and other vital organs of the body to ensure normal body functioning. Once the stress levels go down, normal flow of period is restored.

      Excessive Physical Exertion
      Women athletes are prone to lighter periods because of their rigorous physical training sessions. When their physical activities are less intense, the menstrual flow usually returns to normal. Non athlete women may get lighter period after too much of exercising or traveling.

      Other Reasons for Light Periods
      Young girls and women who eat less to maintain a low body weight often get light periods. This happens because the lack of nutrition and low body weight affect production of hormones in the body. Those women who are suffering from chronic health problems such as diabetes or osteoporosis can have this kind of problem. It can be triggered by thyroid problems or as a side effect of certain medicines.

  19. QUESTION:
    What is your experience with a Thyroid Nodule?
    I am 25 years old and my doc found a small 3X3mm nodlue on my thyroid 2 years ago. I just got another ultrasound and she found that it has grown to 5X7mm. I have to go see an endocrinologist and she thought that he might suggest i get a biopsy.

    She wasnt too concerned that it was cancer, but since my thyroid labwork showed slight "hyperthyroid" activity she wants to figure this out.

    I know nodules are common especially in young women. I have no history of cancer in my family. Although my labwork showed slight hyperthyroid, I am experiencing the EXCAT OPPOSITE maor symptom...i am gaining weight instead of losing.

    to nodules contribute to hyper or hypo thyroidism? Do they remove small nodules like this or not usually? hmm.
    Is removal of part or all of the thyroid a common procedure?

    • ANSWER:
      It has been said that if you had to have cancer, and if you had your choice, thyroid cancer should be high on your list because the cure rate is so excellent. Therefore, if you or your doctor discover a nodule (lump) in your thyroid gland don't panic. Thyroid nodules are very common, but only about 5% of them contain cancer, and more than 90% of thyroid cancers are curable.
      To be sure to help yourself the most, follow your doctor's recommendations for the evaluation of your nodule to determine whether it is one of the 95% that are benign (harmless), or one of the 5% that are malignant.

      Blood tests measure thyroid function
      Here is what usually happens during an evaluation of a thyroid nodule: first you will have an examination and blood tests to determine whether the overall output of thyroid hormone is normal, increased, or decreased. Normal results are usually obtained, because thyroid nodules usually do not produce thyroid hormone, and also do not interfere with the function of the rest of the thyroid gland. Those few nodules that do actively produce thyroid hormone without regard to the body's needs are called autonomous nodules. Patients with these nodules may become hyperthyroid if the blood level of thyroid rises above normal. These nodules are nearly always harmless.

      Top
      On the other hand, sometimes nodules develop in thyroid glands that do not produce normal amounts of thyroid hormone, and blood levels of thyroid hormone in such patients may therefore be low. A very common condition in which this occurs is chronic thyroiditis. The disorder is also known as Hashimoto's thyroiditis in honour of the Japanese physician who first described it in 1912. In this condition, antibodies directed against the thyroid appear in the body, and often can be detected in the blood. Although a nodule in a patient with Hashimoto's thyroiditis is probably part of the thyroiditis, thyroid cancers are sometimes seen in these patients, so further study of such a nodule usually is necessary.

      A very uncommon form of thyroid cancer, medullary cancer, produces a substance called calcitonin. Blood tests can detect calcitonin, sometimes even before these nodules can be felt. Since medullary thyroid cancer often runs in families, the calcitonin test can be done to make the diagnosis early when the disease is highly curable. However since this disorder is uncommon, serum calcitonin is checked routinely only when there is a family history of this type of thyroid cancer.

      Top

      Thyroid scan may help
      An important and widely used initial screening test for thyroid nodules is the thyroid scan. If you have a thyroid scan, you will be given a tiny amount of radioactive material that is taken up by your thyroid. Imaging machines detect the radioactivity and record it on film to produce a picture showing the distribution of the radioactivity in your thyroid. Thyroid nodules may show up on scanning as zones of decreased activity ("cold" nodules) or zones of increased activity ("hot" nodules). Hot nodules almost never contain cancer.

      Most cold nodules are also harmless, but since thyroid cancers usually appear as cold nodules as well, all cold nodules require further study. Some physicians advise an ultrasound test to determine whether a cold nodule is solid (as are most tumors whether or not they contain cancer) or a fluid-filled cyst. Ultrasound studies are being ordered less and less often, because needle biopsy will provide the same information, and also can provide cells and tiny tissue fragments for microscopic study by pathologists.

      Top

      Needle biopsy
      Needle biopsy may sound frightening, but a local anesthetic is used, so that usually you will not have much pain, only a sensation of pressure or mild discomfort. Needle biopsies are of two basic types. If you are to have a fine needle biopsy, the physician doing it will use a very thin needle to withdraw thyroid cells. Ordinarily, several samples are taken from different parts of the nodule to ensure that the nodule has been studied thoroughly. Since large needle biopsy is done with a bigger needle that can take a core of tissue from the nodule, these larger tissue samples are easier for most pathologists to interpret. However, the fine needle biopsy which is simpler and produces less discomfort is the more commonly performed biopsy procedure.

      It takes a few days to obtain the final report from the pathologist who examines the biopsy specimens. The report will usually indicate one of the following findings:

      The nodule is benign (not cancer). This is the result obtained in approximately two-thirds of patients from whom enough tissue has been obtained in the biopsy test. Moreover this diagnosis by an experienced pathologist is highly reliable. The risk of overlooking a cancer is generally less than 5%, and less than 1% in medical centres with the most experience. Generally, these nodules need not be removed. Instead, your doctor may recommend treatment with thyroid hormone in an attempt to shrink the nodule, or at least prevent further growth. If the nodule fails to shrink, or enlarges during treatment, the biopsy can be repeated or the nodule removed surgically.
      Top
      The pathologist's diagnosis at surgery is almost always the same as that obtained from the needle biopsy. Even when enlargement of a nodule does occur, it is more likely to be caused by inner bleeding, degeneration, or inflammation than by malignancy.

      The nodule is malignant (cancer). In my practice about 10% of nodules from which needle biopsy produces specimens adequate for diagnosis are malignant. Such nodules should be removed. Definite or highly suspicious findings of malignancy are nearly always confirmed at surgery. The extent of the operation performed depends upon the type of cancer, the extent of disease determined by tests before the operation, and also the findings during surgery.
      The specimen is inadequate to make any diagnosis. Pathologists experienced with needle biopsy work tend to be very fussy about making diagnoses unless they are confident that sampling of the nodule has been adequate. Some thyroid nodules are composed of dense fibrous tissue, or have undergone such extensive degeneration that recognizable thyroid tissue cannot be obtained. In this situation it is usually best to repeat the biopsy. Other nodules are too small or too deep in the neck to permit needle biopsy. If an adequate specimen cannot be obtained, or if another needle biopsy is impractical, the decision to operate or just observe a thyroid nodule may be based on the physician's experience in evaluating nodules, the physical examination, and the test described above. In some cases your physician may decide to treat you with thyroid hormone for three to six months or longer in the hope that this treatment will cause the nodule to disappear, or at least to shrink as evidence that your nodule is harmless. If it does not get smaller, but instead enlarges, your physician is likely to recommend removal of the nodule in an operation.
      Top

      The biopsy specimen contains sizable amounts of thyroid cells or tissue, but the microscopic findings permit neither the diagnosis nor exclusion of thyroid cancer. About 18% of nodules for which needle biopsy produces specimens thought to be adequate for diagnosis have these inconclusive findings. The only way to establish a diagnosis on these nodules is to remove them surgically and carefully study them microscopically, looking for signs of malignancy. Still, most of these nodules (about 90%) are benign.
      Diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules require skill and experience on the part of all physicians who participate in the evaluation. Needle biopsy has greatly improved the accuracy of diagnosis. In my clinic, the proportion of nodule patients for whom surgery is advised has been reduced significantly and, at the same time, a number of cancers that otherwise might have been overlooked have been identified and promptly treated.

      Above all, if you think you have a lump in your thyroid, have it checked by your doctor. Most nodules are benign and cared for easily. But even those that do turn out to contain cancer are unlikely to develop into a life-threatening problem, since most thyroid cancers are curable. However, the earlier the treatment is given, the better the result will be for you.

  20. QUESTION:
    Any one know of good online adhd online information sights?
    What medicine is your child on and how are they doing?

    • ANSWER:
      Medication is a tool however since it does have side effects and can cover up real problems it should be used after other nondrug treatments such as therapy, behavior modification, and even parenting classes. Check for the things below first before chosing meds.

      Causes of Hyperactivity, impulsivity, and lack of attention span

      For those who are searching for reasons behind their kid’s behavior, here are some possibilities. Many parents, because of not knowing, settle for ADHD as a diagnosis before looking at everything. ADHD is diagnosed by mental health professionals who form their opinion by observing your child's behavior nothing more. There are no brain scans, blood tests, or anything else definite that is used during diagnosis. The problem with that is there are many other problems that have the same symptoms of ADHD. For example, any problem dealing with the fuels of the body: water, food, blood and air can cause behavior problems. Water, food, blood and air to the body is just like gas and oil to a car. If you put bad gas or have old or the wrong oil in your car, it will act up just like a child acts up when eating foods they are allergic to, drinking or breathing contaminated water or air or having blood disorders. There are also many medical, biological, emotional and mental conditions that mimic ADHD also. I’ll provide examples in more detail in the listing that follows. Only settle for the diagnosis of ADHD after checking out all of these problems and many more.

      ! = The conditions to check for first (The most over looked)
      * = Other good possibilities to check for
      ** = Definitely check if there is a family history of the condition
      *** = General problems in which you can think about yourself and check if you see fit.
      Rare = Rare conditions but still good to check for and know about.

      1.(!) Hypoglycemia (Low Blood sugar) Low blood sugar can stem from thyroid disorders, liver or pancreatic problems, or adrenal gland abnormalities, or even an insufficient diet. Hypoglycemia can display the same ADHD like sypmtoms.

      2.(!) Allergies: 15 to 20 percent of the world has some type of allergy. A person can be allergic to nearly anything so check for all forms. Food is one of the primary causes of allergic reactions. Just like the Car and human analogy stated above. If a child eats food they are allergic to, the body will not run properly and that may affect behavior. Everyone has different sensitivities to allergens so just because you aren’t affected does not mean your child won’t be also. (Some examples, Allergic reactions to food dye, milk, chocolate, and grains, ect)

      3.(!) Learning disabilities: If the primary place of behavior problems is at school, learning disabilities may be the cause of ill behavior. One of the main things that affects a child’s self-esteem is how well they do in school. If a child has an undiagnosed learning disorder that makes school much harder and sometimes impossible. Children with undiagnosed learning disabilities are labeled as lazy, stupid, and many other downgrading opinions which affects self-esteem. And many times when a child’s self-esteem is at jeopardy they try to make up for it in other sometimes nonproductive ways such as acting out, bullying, or becoming the class clown.

      4.(!) Hyper or hypothyroidism: An imbalance in metabolism that occurs from an overproduction or underproduction of thyroid hormones. This imbalance may cause a variety of behaviors and may affect all body functions.

      5.(***) Dietary Factors: (For example to much caffeine and sugar) At doses as low as 250 milligrams a day, a level many American children exceed- caffeine can cause rambling speech, attention and concentration problems, agitation, heart palpitations, insomnia, and hyperactive behavior. In a way, it is true we are what we eat.

      6.(Rare) Early stage brain tumors – Found rarely in children but should still be considered. Statistically, this diagnoses may not be important – but to individual families, they assuredly are.

      7.(*)Toxin exposures- Children are more vulnerable to toxins than adults. Such as pesticide-poisoning (Eating vegetables and fruit not washed thoroughly, they can be exposed to them by playing outside on the ground), also by gasoline fumes, and herbicides. Inside there are also many toxins. Disinfectants, furniture polishes and air fresheners are toxins that can affect some children’s behaviors. Beds and carpets are one of the most dangerous places in the house because they are full of different types of dust, and other toxins. Toxins can cause hyperactivity, attention deficits, irritability, and learning problems.

      8.(**) Early-onset diabetes is another problem that displays some of the same symptoms of ADHD – symptoms include aggression, depression, and anxiety. If you have a family history of diabetes checking for this is a must.

      9.(**) Heart disease is another. It affects blood and oxygen flow to the brain affecting brain function that in-turn affects behavior.

      10. (***) Worms – Such as Pinworms. They lay their eggs in the anal area, causing tickling and itching, which are most bothersome at night. The lack of sleep from this type of infestation can cause crankiness or bad behavior during the day. When asleep, nightmares may be present. This problem is mostly found in very young children preschool to kindergarten because of primitive toileting skills, they tend to put their fingers in their mouths, and they participate in a lot of hands-on activities with other kids and with pets. Roundworms, hookworms, and tapeworms are other examples that can make a child display ADHD like symptoms. Worms cause hyperactive behavior, learning problems, depression, or attention deficits by making children miserable on the inside.

      11.(***) Viral or bacterial infections: When a child is affected by an infection that might cause problem behavior.

      12.(***) Malnutrition or improper diet – Many children in the United States do not eat a well balanced diet. A proper diet is necessary to growing children. An improper diet can affect a child’s behavior in an ill way.

      13.(***) Head injuries – Such as the postconcussion syndrome. Some of the symptoms include Irritability, emotionality, memory problems, depression, and sleep disturbances. A concussion can disrupt brain functioning causing ADHD like symptoms.

      14.(*) Spinal Problems- Some spinal problems can cause ADHD like symptoms because if the spine is not connected to the brain properly nerves from the spinal cord can give the brain all of signals at once making a child rambunctious and always on the go.

      15.(*) Carbon Monoxide poisoning – Thousands of children each year are exposed to toxic levels of this gas each year. Sources include gas heaters, and other gas appliances such as fireplaces, dryers, and water heaters.

      16.(***) Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) or Fetal alcohol effects (FAE) – FAS is a name that doctors use to describe the damage done to children’s brains and bodies when their mother drink heavily during pregnancy. It is the leading form of mental retardation today. Prenatal alcohol impairment, however, also comes in a milder form called fetal alcohol effects (FAE). Children with FAE often don’t look disabled, and they tend to score in the low-normal or even normal range of intelligence. But these kids arent normal. Their mal-developed brains cause them to exhibit a wide range of behavior problems, including hyperactivity, attention problems, learning disorders, and ethical problems such as stealing, lying, and cheating.

      17.(**) Cardiac conditions – It can reduce the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrients to the brain. Defective blood vessels between organs to the brain.

      18. (!) Mild to high lead levels, even in the absence of clinical lead poisoning: Research shows that children with even mildly elevated lead levels suffer from reduced IQs, attention deficits, and poor school performance. Lead is the leading culprit in toxin-caused hyperactivity.

      19.(*) High mercury levels – One of the most interesting things I found regarding high mercury levels relates to dental fillings. Children who have mercury amalgam fillings in their mouth and grind their teeth are at risk of high mercury levels. American dental associations are defensive on the subject of mercury fillings but many European countries have discontinued the use of them because of side effects. There are also other causes of high mercury levels.

      20.(*) High manganese levels

      21.(*) Iron deficiency: Iron is an essential component of hemoglobin, the oxygen carrying pigment in the blood. Iron is normally obtained through the food in the diet and by the recycling of iron from old red blood cells. The causes of iron deficiency are too little iron in the diet, poor absorption of iron by the body, and loss of blood. It is also caused by lead poisoning in children.

      22.(*) B vitamin deficiencies: Many experts believe that one of the main causes for inattention, hyperactivity, impulsivity, temper tantrums, sleep disorders, forgetfulness, and aggression are caused by faulty neurotransmissions – a problem with the neurotransmitters in the brain. Vitamin B-6 is a necessary vitamin used in the making of neurotransmitters that affect behavior. A lack of this vitamin or really any other vitamin can cause a child to act inappropriately.

      23.(*) Excessive amounts of Vitamins: Excessive amounts of vitamins can be toxic to the body and may cause the same ADHD like symptoms. It is possible to overdose when taking vitamins so make sure you contact a physician and check for vitamin deficiencies before taking extra vitamins.

      24.(*) Tourette’s syndrome: Tourette's syndrome is a rare but disruptive condition. It involves multiple tics (small, repetitive muscle movements), usually facial tics with grimacing and blinking. Tics may also occur in the shoulders and arms. This is usually accompanied by loud vocalizations, which may include grunts or noises, or uncontrollable (compulsive) use of obscenities or short phrases. The tics are worse during emotional stress and are absent during sleep. The cause is unknown. It occurs most often in boys, and may begin around age 7 or 8 or not until the child is in his or her late teens or early twenties. It may, at times, run in families. This disorder can be mistaken for not being able to sit still or impulsive behavior.

      25.(Rare) Temporal lobe seizures: The Temporal lobe is a part of the brain. Any brain malfunction can cause inappropriate behavior. That’s why conducting brain scans is a must when trying to figure out behavior problems.

      26. (***) Some drugs, both prescription and illegal can cause the brain to atrophy, leading to disturbed cognition and behavior. If your child routinely takes prescription or over-the-counter medications for asthma, hay fever, allergies, headaches, or any other condition, consider the possibility that the drugs are causing or contributing to behavior problems.

      27. (Rare) Brain cysts – Another rare cause of hyperactivity but should still be considered when searching for the reasons behind displayed ADHD like behavior.

      28.(*) Seizure disorders – The most overlooked is the absence Seizures. During an absence seizure, the brain’s normal activity shuts down. The child stares blankly, sometimes rotates his eyes upward, and occasionally blinks or jerks repetitively, he drops objects from his hand, and there may be some mild involuntary movements known as automatisms. The attack lasts for a few seconds and then it is over as rapidly as it begins. If these attacks occur dozens of times each day, they can interfere with a child’s school performance and be confused by parents and teachers with daydreaming.

      29.(*) Metabolic disorders – They reduce the brain’s supply of glucose, the bodies fuel and can cause ADHD like symptoms.

      30.(*) Genetic defects – Some mild forms of genetic disorders can go unnoticed in children and display some of the same symptoms of ADHD. Mild forms of Turner’s syndrome, sickle-cell anemia, and Fragile X syndrome are some examples. Almost any genetic disorder can cause hyperactivity or other behavior problems, even if the disorder isn’t normally linked to such problems. Many genetic diseases disrupt brain functions directly, through a variety of paths. A simple blood test can rule out genetic disorders. I’ll list a couple more with more detail in this list.

      31. (***) Intentionally or unintentionally sniffing materials such as modeling glue or other house hold products

      32. (***) Some disorders such as anemias reduce oxygen to the brain causing disturbance in the brains chemistry causing ADHD like symptoms.

      33. (*) Sleeping disorders or other problems causing fatigue and crankiness during the day.

      34. (*) Post-traumatic subclinical seizure disorder- It causes episodic temper explosions. These fits of temper come out of the blue for no reason. Some of these seizures can be too subtle to detect without a twenty-four-hour electroencephalogram (EEG).

      35. (Rare) Porphyria – a hereditary enzyme-deficiency disease. Enzymes are very important to our body’s chemical reactions. Really nothing occurs in our body without enzymes. A lack of enzymes causes body malfunctioning which can cause ill behavior.

      36. (Rare) Candida Albicans infestation (Yeast Infection) – Candida infestations cause hyperactivity in children. Most children who do suffer from Candida infestations have some underlying problem – frequently an immune disorder, or a disorder affecting carbohydrate metabolism and thus altering blood sugar levels. So immune disorders can cause other problems that also have the same symptoms of ADHD.

      37. (Rare) Intestinal parasites – Parasites rob the body of needed nutrients which in-turn affects behavior.

      38. (***) A beta-hemolytic streptococcus, better known as “strep.” – Although these bacteria are most commonly thought of as the cause of strep throat. Left untreated, strep can cause rheumatic fever and a movement disorder called Sydenham’s chorea. Moreover, recurrent infections can lead, in susceptible children, to a group of symptoms collectively known as PANDAS (Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders) Some symptoms of PANDAS include obsessive-compulsive behavior, Tourette’s syndrome, hyperactivity, cognitive problems, and fidgeting.

      39.(!) Hearing and vision problems: If a child cant see or hear properly, school and daily things in life are nearly impossible and it may cause ADHD like symptoms especially in educational settings.

      40.(***) Lack of exercise: “Hyper Couch Potatoes” are children who aren’t moving enough. Some children because of lack of exercise may seem as though they are always in motion, but often that motion is in fits and spurts: leaping up from a chair, spinning around in the lunch line, bouncing in a chair while watching TV. Quite a few hyperactive children actually do not get enough sustained, strenuous exercise to stay healthy mentally and physically. Exercise can make people happier, less anxious, less hyperactive, and less depressed. One reason is that exercise increases serotonin levels in the brain – exactly what Prozac, Elavil, and similar drugs do.

      41.(***) Gifted Children: Gifted children often display ADHD like symptoms because most of the time they are bored with what other kids their age are doing. Behaviors associated with Giftedness are poor attention, boredom, daydreaming, low tolerance for persistence on tasks that seem irrelevant, their judgment often lags behind their development of intellect, their intensity may lead to power struggles with authorities, and they may have a high activity level. They may need less sleep compared to other children, and they may question rules, customs, and traditions. If your child scores above average on IQ tests, aces exams, has no trouble with homework, has no apparent learning disabilities, and primarily exhibits his or her problems mostly at school, maybe seeking a more challenging class or school would help.

      42. (***) Emotional problems: Kids who are experiencing emotional problems most often display ADHD like symptoms. For example, kids who are constantly subjected to bullying at school can display ADHD like symptoms. These are normal kids that act out because they are scared. They experience sleeping problems, sadness, and they develop physical symptoms, especially if they think those symptoms will keep them home from school. Often they can’t concentrate in class, partly because they are worried and partly because they are suffering from sleep deprivation. Really any emotional problem at school or home in which a child is having trouble coping with can result in ADHD like symptoms.

      43.(***) Some kids are just spoiled and undisciplined – A number of children labeled hyperactive are merely under-disciplined children who need a firmer hand. They are the ones that run their household and get away with anything. Dr Syndey Walker stated this problem best of why parents under-discipline their children. He stated that he blamed this rise in bratty kids not on parents but on the psychological experts who have counseled parents for several decades that children are fragile, easily traumatized little flowers who could be ruined for life by a cross look or a scolding which is very untrue. Children need firm discipline and strict rules – not abuse but setting rules and standards and demanding those standards be met, and giving consequences when your rules are broken. Labeling undisciplined kids as ADHD just gives them an excuse for their misbehavior, which will often make it worse.

      44.(*) Sensory Integration Dysfunction- Sensory Integration Dysfunction is the inefficient neurological processing of information received through the senses, causing problems with learning, development, and behavior. These children are over-sensitive or under-sensitive dealing in touch, taste, smell, sound, or sight. For example, some of these children crave fast and spinning movement, such as swinging, rocking, twirling, and riding the merry-go-round- without getting dizzy. These children may move constantly, fidget, enjoy getting into upside down positions and be a daredevil. These children may become overexcited when there is too much to look at – words, toys, or other children. They may cover their eyes, have poor eye contact, be inattentive when drawing or doing desk work, or overreact to bright light. These children often act out in an attempt to cope with their inability to process sensory information such as acting out in crowded or loud places.

      45. (***) Spirited children – When dealing with spirited children the problem usually does not lie with the child but with society’s perception of what normal childhood behavior is. Many normal children, according to some people, display ADHD like symptoms not because they are hyperactive or lack sufficient attention spans but because the person forming the opinion has unrealistic standards of how a child should behave.

      46.(***) CAPD (Central Auditory processing Disorder)- will sometimes occur in children who have had a history of ear infections and/or PE tubes. Symptoms include distractibility, inability to follow a set of verbal instructions, "space out", etc.

      47. (**) Early-Onset Bi-Polar disorder: Also know as child-like Bi-polar. The experts state that 85% of children with child-like Bi-polar also meet the criteria for ADHD. The symptoms are extremely close. Most people when they think of Bi-polar disorder, think of Adult like Bipolar which mood swings happen over a some what long period of time. In child-like Bipolar, the mood swings can happen many times within a twenty four hour day, known as rapid cycling. At one moment they’re calm and the next minute they could be in a full fledge temper tantrum. Some of the symptoms are Distractibility, Hyperactivity, impulsivity, separation anxiety, restlessness, depressed mood, low self esteem, and many more. Early-Onset Bi-polar should be ruled out before ADHD is considered mainly because they are treated with different medications – if you choose medications that is. ADHD is treated with stimulant medications which will make a Bipolar child worse possibly psychotic.

      48. (Rare) Klinefelter syndrom: A Genetic disorder in which a male has an extra X chromosome (XXY). Many individuals experience learning, behavior, and social problems. A degree of subnormal intelligence appears in some affected individuals. Many affected individuals are skinny and taller than most of their peers. A simple blood test can rule this disorder out.

      49.(Rare) Genetic Disorder XYY- The extra Y chromosome has been associated with antisocial behavior.

      50.(***) Lack of understanding and communication skills: One of the main reasons why a child acts out and throws temper tantrums when they have a problem is because of their lack of understanding of a problem and lack of expressing how they feel. Children do not have the vocabulary or know how to express their emotions like adults do, that’s why many act out when they are in a difficult situation. They are not able to tell you something is wrong so they show you instead. This is one reason why any emotional or medical problem can cause acting out behavior in children.

      Good luck,
      Counselor Dan (Child Counselor)

  21. QUESTION:
    Do you know of a person with ADD or ADHD?
    Do you have a child with adhd?

    Additional Details

    15 minutes ago
    add anything you want to and it can be about yourself,a friend,family member, etc...

    I have adhd,mild mental retardation and deafness and some other special needs. So just tell whatever you feel comfortable telling.

    I have problems with my behavior and i been thinking i need behavior therapy to help with my behavior.
    I also have communication disorder,ptsd,panic disorder,dyspraxia,sensory integration disorder,depression.

    You can give me your story, it is interesting to me. thanks.

    I also take medicine for my adhd and take ritalin.

    • ANSWER:
      Medication is a tool however since it does have side effects and can cover up real problems it should be used after other nondrug treatments such as therapy, behavior modification, and even parenting classes. Check for the things below first before chosing meds.

      Causes of Hyperactivity, impulsivity, and lack of attention span

      For those who are searching for reasons behind their kid’s behavior, here are some possibilities. Many parents, because of not knowing, settle for ADHD as a diagnosis before looking at everything. ADHD is diagnosed by mental health professionals who form their opinion by observing your child's behavior nothing more. There are no brain scans, blood tests, or anything else definite that is used during diagnosis. The problem with that is there are many other problems that have the same symptoms of ADHD. For example, any problem dealing with the fuels of the body: water, food, blood and air can cause behavior problems. Water, food, blood and air to the body is just like gas and oil to a car. If you put bad gas or have old or the wrong oil in your car, it will act up just like a child acts up when eating foods they are allergic to, drinking or breathing contaminated water or air or having blood disorders. There are also many medical, biological, emotional and mental conditions that mimic ADHD also. I’ll provide examples in more detail in the listing that follows. Only settle for the diagnosis of ADHD after checking out all of these problems and many more.

      ! = The conditions to check for first (The most over looked)
      * = Other good possibilities to check for
      ** = Definitely check if there is a family history of the condition
      *** = General problems in which you can think about yourself and check if you see fit.
      Rare = Rare conditions but still good to check for and know about.

      1.(!) Hypoglycemia (Low Blood sugar) Low blood sugar can stem from thyroid disorders, liver or pancreatic problems, or adrenal gland abnormalities, or even an insufficient diet. Hypoglycemia can display the same ADHD like sypmtoms.

      2.(!) Allergies: 15 to 20 percent of the world has some type of allergy. A person can be allergic to nearly anything so check for all forms. Food is one of the primary causes of allergic reactions. Just like the Car and human analogy stated above. If a child eats food they are allergic to, the body will not run properly and that may affect behavior. Everyone has different sensitivities to allergens so just because you aren’t affected does not mean your child won’t be also. (Some examples, Allergic reactions to food dye, milk, chocolate, and grains, ect)

      3.(!) Learning disabilities: If the primary place of behavior problems is at school, learning disabilities may be the cause of ill behavior. One of the main things that affects a child’s self-esteem is how well they do in school. If a child has an undiagnosed learning disorder that makes school much harder and sometimes impossible. Children with undiagnosed learning disabilities are labeled as lazy, stupid, and many other downgrading opinions which affects self-esteem. And many times when a child’s self-esteem is at jeopardy they try to make up for it in other sometimes nonproductive ways such as acting out, bullying, or becoming the class clown.

      4.(!) Hyper or hypothyroidism: An imbalance in metabolism that occurs from an overproduction or underproduction of thyroid hormones. This imbalance may cause a variety of behaviors and may affect all body functions.

      5.(***) Dietary Factors: (For example to much caffeine and sugar) At doses as low as 250 milligrams a day, a level many American children exceed- caffeine can cause rambling speech, attention and concentration problems, agitation, heart palpitations, insomnia, and hyperactive behavior. In a way, it is true we are what we eat.

      6.(Rare) Early stage brain tumors – Found rarely in children but should still be considered. Statistically, this diagnoses may not be important – but to individual families, they assuredly are.

      7.(*)Toxin exposures- Children are more vulnerable to toxins than adults. Such as pesticide-poisoning (Eating vegetables and fruit not washed thoroughly, they can be exposed to them by playing outside on the ground), also by gasoline fumes, and herbicides. Inside there are also many toxins. Disinfectants, furniture polishes and air fresheners are toxins that can affect some children’s behaviors. Beds and carpets are one of the most dangerous places in the house because they are full of different types of dust, and other toxins. Toxins can cause hyperactivity, attention deficits, irritability, and learning problems.

      8.(**) Early-onset diabetes is another problem that displays some of the same symptoms of ADHD – symptoms include aggression, depression, and anxiety. If you have a family history of diabetes checking for this is a must.

      9.(**) Heart disease is another. It affects blood and oxygen flow to the brain affecting brain function that in-turn affects behavior.

      10. (***) Worms – Such as Pinworms. They lay their eggs in the anal area, causing tickling and itching, which are most bothersome at night. The lack of sleep from this type of infestation can cause crankiness or bad behavior during the day. When asleep, nightmares may be present. This problem is mostly found in very young children preschool to kindergarten because of primitive toileting skills, they tend to put their fingers in their mouths, and they participate in a lot of hands-on activities with other kids and with pets. Roundworms, hookworms, and tapeworms are other examples that can make a child display ADHD like symptoms. Worms cause hyperactive behavior, learning problems, depression, or attention deficits by making children miserable on the inside.

      11.(***) Viral or bacterial infections: When a child is affected by an infection that might cause problem behavior.

      12.(***) Malnutrition or improper diet – Many children in the United States do not eat a well balanced diet. A proper diet is necessary to growing children. An improper diet can affect a child’s behavior in an ill way.

      13.(***) Head injuries – Such as the postconcussion syndrome. Some of the symptoms include Irritability, emotionality, memory problems, depression, and sleep disturbances. A concussion can disrupt brain functioning causing ADHD like symptoms.

      14.(*) Spinal Problems- Some spinal problems can cause ADHD like symptoms because if the spine is not connected to the brain properly nerves from the spinal cord can give the brain all of signals at once making a child rambunctious and always on the go.

      15.(*) Carbon Monoxide poisoning – Thousands of children each year are exposed to toxic levels of this gas each year. Sources include gas heaters, and other gas appliances such as fireplaces, dryers, and water heaters.

      16.(***) Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) or Fetal alcohol effects (FAE) – FAS is a name that doctors use to describe the damage done to children’s brains and bodies when their mother drink heavily during pregnancy. It is the leading form of mental retardation today. Prenatal alcohol impairment, however, also comes in a milder form called fetal alcohol effects (FAE). Children with FAE often don’t look disabled, and they tend to score in the low-normal or even normal range of intelligence. But these kids arent normal. Their mal-developed brains cause them to exhibit a wide range of behavior problems, including hyperactivity, attention problems, learning disorders, and ethical problems such as stealing, lying, and cheating.

      17.(**) Cardiac conditions – It can reduce the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrients to the brain. Defective blood vessels between organs to the brain.

      18. (!) Mild to high lead levels, even in the absence of clinical lead poisoning: Research shows that children with even mildly elevated lead levels suffer from reduced IQs, attention deficits, and poor school performance. Lead is the leading culprit in toxin-caused hyperactivity.

      19.(*) High mercury levels – One of the most interesting things I found regarding high mercury levels relates to dental fillings. Children who have mercury amalgam fillings in their mouth and grind their teeth are at risk of high mercury levels. American dental associations are defensive on the subject of mercury fillings but many European countries have discontinued the use of them because of side effects. There are also other causes of high mercury levels.

      20.(*) High manganese levels

      21.(*) Iron deficiency: Iron is an essential component of hemoglobin, the oxygen carrying pigment in the blood. Iron is normally obtained through the food in the diet and by the recycling of iron from old red blood cells. The causes of iron deficiency are too little iron in the diet, poor absorption of iron by the body, and loss of blood. It is also caused by lead poisoning in children.

      22.(*) B vitamin deficiencies: Many experts believe that one of the main causes for inattention, hyperactivity, impulsivity, temper tantrums, sleep disorders, forgetfulness, and aggression are caused by faulty neurotransmissions – a problem with the neurotransmitters in the brain. Vitamin B-6 is a necessary vitamin used in the making of neurotransmitters that affect behavior. A lack of this vitamin or really any other vitamin can cause a child to act inappropriately.

      23.(*) Excessive amounts of Vitamins: Excessive amounts of vitamins can be toxic to the body and may cause the same ADHD like symptoms. It is possible to overdose when taking vitamins so make sure you contact a physician and check for vitamin deficiencies before taking extra vitamins.

      24.(*) Tourette’s syndrome: Tourette's syndrome is a rare but disruptive condition. It involves multiple tics (small, repetitive muscle movements), usually facial tics with grimacing and blinking. Tics may also occur in the shoulders and arms. This is usually accompanied by loud vocalizations, which may include grunts or noises, or uncontrollable (compulsive) use of obscenities or short phrases. The tics are worse during emotional stress and are absent during sleep. The cause is unknown. It occurs most often in boys, and may begin around age 7 or 8 or not until the child is in his or her late teens or early twenties. It may, at times, run in families. This disorder can be mistaken for not being able to sit still or impulsive behavior.

      25.(Rare) Temporal lobe seizures: The Temporal lobe is a part of the brain. Any brain malfunction can cause inappropriate behavior. That’s why conducting brain scans is a must when trying to figure out behavior problems.

      26. (***) Some drugs, both prescription and illegal can cause the brain to atrophy, leading to disturbed cognition and behavior. If your child routinely takes prescription or over-the-counter medications for asthma, hay fever, allergies, headaches, or any other condition, consider the possibility that the drugs are causing or contributing to behavior problems.

      27. (Rare) Brain cysts – Another rare cause of hyperactivity but should still be considered when searching for the reasons behind displayed ADHD like behavior.

      28.(*) Seizure disorders – The most overlooked is the absence Seizures. During an absence seizure, the brain’s normal activity shuts down. The child stares blankly, sometimes rotates his eyes upward, and occasionally blinks or jerks repetitively, he drops objects from his hand, and there may be some mild involuntary movements known as automatisms. The attack lasts for a few seconds and then it is over as rapidly as it begins. If these attacks occur dozens of times each day, they can interfere with a child’s school performance and be confused by parents and teachers with daydreaming.

      29.(*) Metabolic disorders – They reduce the brain’s supply of glucose, the bodies fuel and can cause ADHD like symptoms.

      30.(*) Genetic defects – Some mild forms of genetic disorders can go unnoticed in children and display some of the same symptoms of ADHD. Mild forms of Turner’s syndrome, sickle-cell anemia, and Fragile X syndrome are some examples. Almost any genetic disorder can cause hyperactivity or other behavior problems, even if the disorder isn’t normally linked to such problems. Many genetic diseases disrupt brain functions directly, through a variety of paths. A simple blood test can rule out genetic disorders. I’ll list a couple more with more detail in this list.

      31. (***) Intentionally or unintentionally sniffing materials such as modeling glue or other house hold products

      32. (***) Some disorders such as anemias reduce oxygen to the brain causing disturbance in the brains chemistry causing ADHD like symptoms.

      33. (*) Sleeping disorders or other problems causing fatigue and crankiness during the day.

      34. (*) Post-traumatic subclinical seizure disorder- It causes episodic temper explosions. These fits of temper come out of the blue for no reason. Some of these seizures can be too subtle to detect without a twenty-four-hour electroencephalogram (EEG).

      35. (Rare) Porphyria – a hereditary enzyme-deficiency disease. Enzymes are very important to our body’s chemical reactions. Really nothing occurs in our body without enzymes. A lack of enzymes causes body malfunctioning which can cause ill behavior.

      36. (Rare) Candida Albicans infestation (Yeast Infection) – Candida infestations cause hyperactivity in children. Most children who do suffer from Candida infestations have some underlying problem – frequently an immune disorder, or a disorder affecting carbohydrate metabolism and thus altering blood sugar levels. So immune disorders can cause other problems that also have the same symptoms of ADHD.

      37. (Rare) Intestinal parasites – Parasites rob the body of needed nutrients which in-turn affects behavior.

      38. (***) A beta-hemolytic streptococcus, better known as “strep.” – Although these bacteria are most commonly thought of as the cause of strep throat. Left untreated, strep can cause rheumatic fever and a movement disorder called Sydenham’s chorea. Moreover, recurrent infections can lead, in susceptible children, to a group of symptoms collectively known as PANDAS (Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders) Some symptoms of PANDAS include obsessive-compulsive behavior, Tourette’s syndrome, hyperactivity, cognitive problems, and fidgeting.

      39.(!) Hearing and vision problems: If a child cant see or hear properly, school and daily things in life are nearly impossible and it may cause ADHD like symptoms especially in educational settings.

      40.(***) Lack of exercise: “Hyper Couch Potatoes” are children who aren’t moving enough. Some children because of lack of exercise may seem as though they are always in motion, but often that motion is in fits and spurts: leaping up from a chair, spinning around in the lunch line, bouncing in a chair while watching TV. Quite a few hyperactive children actually do not get enough sustained, strenuous exercise to stay healthy mentally and physically. Exercise can make people happier, less anxious, less hyperactive, and less depressed. One reason is that exercise increases serotonin levels in the brain – exactly what Prozac, Elavil, and similar drugs do.

      41.(***) Gifted Children: Gifted children often display ADHD like symptoms because most of the time they are bored with what other kids their age are doing. Behaviors associated with Giftedness are poor attention, boredom, daydreaming, low tolerance for persistence on tasks that seem irrelevant, their judgment often lags behind their development of intellect, their intensity may lead to power struggles with authorities, and they may have a high activity level. They may need less sleep compared to other children, and they may question rules, customs, and traditions. If your child scores above average on IQ tests, aces exams, has no trouble with homework, has no apparent learning disabilities, and primarily exhibits his or her problems mostly at school, maybe seeking a more challenging class or school would help.

      42. (***) Emotional problems: Kids who are experiencing emotional problems most often display ADHD like symptoms. For example, kids who are constantly subjected to bullying at school can display ADHD like symptoms. These are normal kids that act out because they are scared. They experience sleeping problems, sadness, and they develop physical symptoms, especially if they think those symptoms will keep them home from school. Often they can’t concentrate in class, partly because they are worried and partly because they are suffering from sleep deprivation. Really any emotional problem at school or home in which a child is having trouble coping with can result in ADHD like symptoms.

      43.(***) Some kids are just spoiled and undisciplined – A number of children labeled hyperactive are merely under-disciplined children who need a firmer hand. They are the ones that run their household and get away with anything. Dr Syndey Walker stated this problem best of why parents under-discipline their children. He stated that he blamed this rise in bratty kids not on parents but on the psychological experts who have counseled parents for several decades that children are fragile, easily traumatized little flowers who could be ruined for life by a cross look or a scolding which is very untrue. Children need firm discipline and strict rules – not abuse but setting rules and standards and demanding those standards be met, and giving consequences when your rules are broken. Labeling undisciplined kids as ADHD just gives them an excuse for their misbehavior, which will often make it worse.

      44.(*) Sensory Integration Dysfunction- Sensory Integration Dysfunction is the inefficient neurological processing of information received through the senses, causing problems with learning, development, and behavior. These children are over-sensitive or under-sensitive dealing in touch, taste, smell, sound, or sight. For example, some of these children crave fast and spinning movement, such as swinging, rocking, twirling, and riding the merry-go-round- without getting dizzy. These children may move constantly, fidget, enjoy getting into upside down positions and be a daredevil. These children may become overexcited when there is too much to look at – words, toys, or other children. They may cover their eyes, have poor eye contact, be inattentive when drawing or doing desk work, or overreact to bright light. These children often act out in an attempt to cope with their inability to process sensory information such as acting out in crowded or loud places.

      45. (***) Spirited children – When dealing with spirited children the problem usually does not lie with the child but with society’s perception of what normal childhood behavior is. Many normal children, according to some people, display ADHD like symptoms not because they are hyperactive or lack sufficient attention spans but because the person forming the opinion has unrealistic standards of how a child should behave.

      46.(***) CAPD (Central Auditory processing Disorder)- will sometimes occur in children who have had a history of ear infections and/or PE tubes. Symptoms include distractibility, inability to follow a set of verbal instructions, "space out", etc.

      47. (**) Early-Onset Bi-Polar disorder: Also know as child-like Bi-polar. The experts state that 85% of children with child-like Bi-polar also meet the criteria for ADHD. The symptoms are extremely close. Most people when they think of Bi-polar disorder, think of Adult like Bipolar which mood swings happen over a some what long period of time. In child-like Bipolar, the mood swings can happen many times within a twenty four hour day, known as rapid cycling. At one moment they’re calm and the next minute they could be in a full fledge temper tantrum. Some of the symptoms are Distractibility, Hyperactivity, impulsivity, separation anxiety, restlessness, depressed mood, low self esteem, and many more. Early-Onset Bi-polar should be ruled out before ADHD is considered mainly because they are treated with different medications – if you choose medications that is. ADHD is treated with stimulant medications which will make a Bipolar child worse possibly psychotic.

      48. (Rare) Klinefelter syndrom: A Genetic disorder in which a male has an extra X chromosome (XXY). Many individuals experience learning, behavior, and social problems. A degree of subnormal intelligence appears in some affected individuals. Many affected individuals are skinny and taller than most of their peers. A simple blood test can rule this disorder out.

      49.(Rare) Genetic Disorder XYY- The extra Y chromosome has been associated with antisocial behavior.

      50.(***) Lack of understanding and communication skills: One of the main reasons why a child acts out and throws temper tantrums when they have a problem is because of their lack of understanding of a problem and lack of expressing how they feel. Children do not have the vocabulary or know how to express their emotions like adults do, that’s why many act out when they are in a difficult situation. They are not able to tell you something is wrong so they show you instead. This is one reason why any emotional or medical problem can cause acting out behavior in children.

      Good luck,
      Counselor Dan

  22. QUESTION:
    what is the difference between the symptoms of PCOS and pituitary tumor?

    • ANSWER:
      Signs and symptoms
      Common symptoms of PCOS include

      Oligomenorrhea, amenorrhea - irregular, few, or absent menstrual periods; cycles that do occur may comprise heavy bleeding (heavy bleeding is also an early warning sign of endometrial cancer, for which women with PCOS are at higher risk)
      Infertility, generally resulting from chronic anovulation (lack of ovulation)
      Elevated serum (blood) levels of androgens (male hormones), specifically testosterone, androstenedione, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), causing hirsutism and occasionally masculinization
      Central obesity - "apple-shaped" obesity centered around the lower half of the torso
      Androgenic alopecia (male-pattern baldness)
      Acne, oily skin, seborrhea
      Acanthosis nigricans (dark patches of skin, tan to dark brown or black)
      Acrochordons (skin tags) - tiny flaps of skin
      Prolonged periods of PMS-like symptoms (bloating, mood swings, pelvic pain, backaches)
      Sleep apnea
      Mild symptoms of hyperandrogenism, such as acne or hyperseborrhea, are frequent in adolescent girls, and are often associated with irregular menstrual cycles. In most instances, these symptoms are transient and only reflect the immaturity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovary axis during the first years following menarche. [1]

      Signs are:

      Multiple cysts on the ovaries (one form of ovarian cyst). Sonographically they may look like a string of pearls.
      Enlarged ovaries, generally 1.5 to 3 times larger than normal, resulting from multiple cysts
      Thickened, smooth, pearl-white outer surface of ovary
      The ratio of LH (Luteinizing hormone) to FSH (Follicle stimulating hormone) is greater than 1:1, as tested on Day 3 of the menstrual cycle.
      High levels of testosterone.
      Low levels of sex hormone binding globulin.
      Hyperinsulinemia

      Signs and symptoms
      Pituitary tumors that produce hormones are called functioning tumors. Tumors that don't produce hormones are known as nonfunctioning pituitary tumors.

      Different types of functioning tumors can develop in your pituitary gland, each causing specific signs and symptoms:

      Adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing tumors. These pituitary tumors produce the hormone adrenocorticotropin, which stimulates your adrenal glands to make the hormone cortisol. When your adrenal glands produce too much cortisol, a condition called Cushing's syndrome occurs. Signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome may include weight gain around your midsection and upper back, exaggerated facial roundness, a characteristic hump on the upper part of your back, high blood pressure, muscle weakness and thinning of your skin.
      Growth hormone-producing tumors. These tumors produce excess growth hormone. The physical effects from excess growth hormone (acromegaly) may include coarsened facial features, enlarged hands and feet, high blood pressure and heart problems. Accelerated and excessive growth (gigantism) may occur in children.
      Prolactin-producing tumors. Overproduction of prolactin from a pituitary tumor (prolactinoma) can cause a decrease in normal levels of sex hormones — estrogen in women and testosterone in men. Excessive prolactin in the blood (hyperprolactinemia) can affect men and women differently.

      In women, prolactinoma may cause irregular menstrual periods (oligomenorrhea), lack of menstrual periods (amenorrhea) and milky discharge from the breasts (galactorrhea).

      In men, a prolactin-producing tumor may cause male hypogonadism, which may involve signs and symptoms such as enlarged breasts (gynecomastia), erectile dysfunction (ED) or impotence, infertility, decrease in body hair, and loss of interest in sexual activity.

      Thyroid-stimulating hormone-producing tumors. When a pituitary tumor overproduces thyroid-stimulating hormone, your thyroid gland makes too much of the hormone thyroxine. This is a rare cause of hyperthyroidism, or overactive thyroid disease. Hyperthyroidism can accelerate your body's metabolism, causing sudden weight loss, a rapid or irregular heartbeat, and nervousness or irritability.
      Functioning and nonfunctioning pituitary tumors may cause other signs and symptoms, including:

      Headache
      Vision changes, such as decreased peripheral vision or double vision
      Seizures
      Clear, watery nasal drainage
      Hair loss
      Cold intolerance
      Constipation
      Irritability
      Weakness
      Fatigue
      Nausea
      Vomiting
      Low blood pressure
      Unintended weight loss or gain

  23. QUESTION:
    Help! I have a cat that's possessed by the constant desire to eat! I just came home from work and fed her
    a whole can of Whiskas. She also has dry food available 24/7. She was also fed canned food at least twice earlier today. She is a petite cat. She only weighs 6 pounds and recent bloodwork showed that she does not have hyperthyroidism! She clings to me like a little Monkey until I feed her!

    • ANSWER:
      I am dealing with that very problem right now.I took my cat who weighed 7 lbs at one time, who is now 6 lbs to the vet because she was always asking me to feed her, she would meow until I gave her some food..and then start again maybe a 1/2 hour or so later...She had been losing some weight after the intense eating thing....I had her checked out,she is 13 years old. I figured maybe hyperthyroid or kidney disease or diabetes...all of which they want a lot of food to eat...she came back fine for the diabetes,normal glucose, and the kidney disease indictors in the blood were all normal...normal liver function and normal blood counts..she had a complete wellness blood profile. Her thyroid came back..."Low...not high."..well, she did not fit the description of a hypothyroid cat..her skin is soft, she is not fat..and she did not have any other symptoms of hypothyroid...My vets told me that it is rare for a cat to be low thyroid, but when it does show up, it is when it is really low because of a yet to be diagnosed chronic illness. I brought her back in a month...but in the month she had more episodes of softer and softer stools..with a real absolutely horrible odor...worse than normal ...I brought a stool sample that day..my vet looked at it and said...I think we know what is wrong..it is her pancreas...she will eat and eat and lose weight..she will be lethargic and my dear kitty sure fit the definition. We did another blood test, this time sent to Texas for special testing...and it came back she has pancreatic insufficiency. That means she will eat and eat, but cannot absorb the nutrition..hence she also lost weight and as the disease progresses the stools become soft to the point of diarrhea. She also was found to be deficient in B12 and she needs that supplemented with injections..very inexpensive...these cats as it gets worse get dehydrated and need to eat.more and more and in time get worse..and if not treated it can be deadly..Only a specific blood test will show if the pancreas is working correctly, the blood test is on patent and can only be done in certain locations...this was Texas A&M University , the GI department.....I suggest you check her for diabetes, if you have not done already as well. It is rare for a cat to have this pancreas thing,..dogs get it more often..My cat clings to me and wants food a lot, she will talk a lot..she is going to need pancreatic enzymes so she can digest the food she eats so much of, and actually not be so unbelievably hungry all the time..we are working on it now..she was just diagnosed this week...Usually in kidney failure they eat and drink a lot and urinate a lot..but they also vomit..In diabetes they are always hungry..the pancreas is involved in diabetes as well. However, they will eat and eat and lose weight...I know this is long..but I hope it in some way helps you...I have been dealing with a "starvin marvin" a lot..That is not her real name, but it describes her appetite..
      You did not say how old your kitty is..I would also suggest you get a food that is higher protein once you know the higher protein will not hurt her..kidney kitties have to have low protein...There are some dry ones out there now...one is made by Wellness...and there are others..I just saw one in Petsmart that is made by Blu Spa..high protein dry food ....Carbs make them gain weight and also the feeling of being full ,does not last as long with dry food that is high in carbs.
      I hope some of this helps...and you can figure out why she is doing this..I certainly can empathize with you........

  24. QUESTION:
    What happens to a woman if she does not produce enough oestrogen?
    Biology

    • ANSWER:
      Symptoms of low estrogen typically occur in women approaching and experiencing menopause. However, younger women can also experience low estrogen, but their symptoms (and causes) differ from menopausal women.

      There are three types of estrogen: estriol, estradiol and estrone. Some women do not naturally produce enough of one or all forms. Abnormal levels could signal the presence of ovarian or adrenal cancer. Young women can experience low estrogen levels from a variety of causes, and the type of testing used to measure levels depends on symptoms, age, family history and physical exam.

      Symptoms
      The most common symptom of low estrogen in younger women is lack of menstruation and delayed development. Younger women, under age 40, with low estrogen can experience early menopause resulting in hot flashes and night sweats. Fatigue is a common complaint associated the condition. Women report forgetfulness, insomnia, lack of sexual desire and painful intercourse when estrogen levels are low or begin to decline. Irregular menstruation or lack of menstruation occurs. Bladder infections and headaches might occur. Mood changes that lead to crying, feelings of depression and irritability are also symptoms. Bone loss also occurs that leads to osteoporosis. Inability to become pregnant can signal low estrogen levels in younger women.

      Natural Estrogen MDs The Most Highly Trained Physicians in Natural Estrogen Hormone Therapy www.BodyLogicMD.com/NaturalEstrogen
      Sponsored Links
      Function
      Estrogen is produced primarily in the ovaries. Some estrogen is produced by the adrenal glands. Signals for estrogen production come from the pituitary gland, and levels vary throughout life depending on the stage of a woman's menstrual cycle. Estrogen is the hormone that provides female characteristics for women.

      Conditions
      Genetic disease can result in low estrogen in younger women. Turner syndrome is an inherited disease that leads to short stature and lack of ovulation, normal female development and lack of menstruation. Chemotherapy or radiation can also interfere with estrogen production, along with thyroid disorders.

      Other Causes

      Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/22600-low-estrogen-symptoms-younger-women/#ixzz1mly2Nw6X

  25. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when you have a low-thyroid count ?
    What are thyroids , and is it bad if you have it low ? the doc told me it was low , and asked me questions like If i was gaining or losing weight suddenly , and no Im fine , Or if ive felt fatigued and such , and still no I eat and sleep normally , So I want to know if its bad/severe that its low , i asked the doc , but she just told me to go back to redo a blood test before we get worked up about it .. Please help ..

    • ANSWER:
      I have searched this topic to help you out in detail, and you don't have to worry much:

      Definition Return to top

      Primary hypothyroidism is a condition of decreased hormone production by the thyroid gland.

      Causes, incidence, and risk factors Return to top

      The thyroid gland is an important organ that regulates metabolism. It is located in the front of the neck just below the voice box (larynx). The thyroid gland secretes two forms of thyroid hormone – thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). The secretion of T3 and T4 by the thyroid is controlled by a feedback system involving the pituitary gland, a small organ at the base of the brain, and the hypothalamus, a structure in the brain.

      Hypothyroidism caused by the inability of the thyroid gland to make T3 and T4 is called primary hypothyroidism. Worldwide, the most common cause of primary hypothyroidism is deficiency of the element iodine. In the US, the most common cause is destruction of the thyroid gland by the immune system, a condition called Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

      Other causes of primary hypothyroidism include surgical removal of part or all of the thyroid gland, radioactive iodine used for treatment of hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid), radiation exposure to the neck, special x-ray dyes, and certain drugs such as lithium. Approximately 5-10% of women develop hypothyroidism after pregnancy (often referred to as “postpartum thyroiditis"). Some cases of hypothyroidism may be caused by a lack of enzymes that convert T3 and T4 for use in the body. In other cases, the cause of hypothyroidism is unknown.

      Since the thyroid gland is regulated by the pituitary gland and hypothalamus, disorders of these organs can cause the thyroid gland to produce too little thyroid hormone as well. This condition is called secondary hypothyroidism.

      Primary hypothyroidism affects the whole body and may cause a variety of symptoms. The body's normal rate of functioning slows, causing mental and physical sluggishness. Symptoms may vary from mild to severe. The most severe form is called myxedema coma and is a medical emergency. Risk factors for hypothyroidism include age (older than age 50), female gender, obesity, thyroid surgery, and x-ray or radiation treatments to the neck.

      Symptoms Return to top

      Early symptoms:

      * Weakness
      * Fatigue
      * Cold intolerance
      * Constipation
      * Weight gain
      * Depression
      * Muscle or joint pain
      * Thin, brittle fingernails
      * Thin, brittle hair
      * Paleness

      Late symptoms:

      * Slow speech
      * Dry flaky skin
      * Thickening of the skin
      * Puffy face, hands, and feet
      * Decreased sense of taste and smell
      * Thinning of eyebrows
      * Hoarseness
      * Menstrual disorders

      Signs and tests Return to top

      Physical examination may reveal a smaller than normal gland, though sometimes the gland is normal in size or even enlarged (goiter). Other physical findings include pale, yellow, and dry skin; thin, brittle hair; loss of the edges of the eyebrows; coarse facial features; firm swelling of the arms and legs; and slow muscle relaxation when reflexes are tested. Vital signs may reveal a slow heart rate, low blood pressure, and low temperature.

      A chest x-ray sometimes reveals an enlarged heart.

      Laboratory tests to determine thyroid function include:

      * Free T4 test (low)
      * Total T3 or free T3 (low)
      * Serum TSH (high)

      Additional laboratory abnormalities may include:

      * Increased cholesterol levels
      * Increased liver enzymes
      * Increased serum prolactin
      * Low serum sodium
      * A complete blood count (CBC) shows anemia

      Treatment Return to top

      The purpose of treatment is to replace the deficient thyroid hormone. Levothyroxine (T4) is the most commonly used medication, but a preparation of T3 is also available. Most people feel their best when TSH is brought into the 1 to 2 mcIU/mL range. People get the lowest dose that is effective in relieving symptoms and normalizing blood tests.

      Life-long therapy is needed. Relapses will occur if therapy is interrupted. Medication must be continued even when symptoms go away.

      After replacement therapy has begun, report any symptoms of increased thyroid activity (hyperthyroidism), such as restlessness, rapid weight loss, heat intolerance, and sweating.

      Myxedema coma is treated by intravenous thyroid replacement and steroid therapy. Supportive therapy (oxygen, assisted ventilation, and fluid replacement) and intensive care nursing may be indicated.

      Expectations (prognosis) Return to top

      With early treatment, the condition can be completely controlled. However, relapses will occur if the medication is not continued. Myxedema coma can result in death.

      Complications Return to top

      Myxedema coma, the most severe form of hypothyroidism, is rare. It may be caused by an infection, illness, exposure to cold, or certain medications. Symptoms and signs of myxedema coma include:

      * Unresponsiveness
      * Decreased breathing
      * Low blood pressure
      * Low blood sugar
      * Below-normal temperature

      Other complications include:

      * Heart disease
      * Increased risk of infection
      * Infertility
      * Miscarriage
      * Pituitary tumors

      Calling your health care provider Return to top

      Call your health care provider if signs or symptoms of hypothyroidism or myxedema are present

      Call your health care provider if restlessness, rapid weight loss, heat intolerance, rapid heart rate, excessive sweating, or symptoms of hyperthyroidism occur after beginning thyroid replacement.

      Prevention Return to top

      Primary hypothyroidism is preventable by supplemental iodine in areas where iodine in the food supply is low. Otherwise, the condition is not preventable. Awareness of risk may allow early diagnosis and treatment. Some experts advocate screening TSH testing in certain high risk groups (e.g., women older than 50 years).

  26. QUESTION:
    Why is my cat losing so much weight?
    I have a sweet 14 year old cat; He has always been a very healthy indoor cat. He went to the vet about 2 months ago for a gum abscess. Along with that, he had many tests done (considering his age). His thyroid came out fine, no diabetes... his weight was normal.

    Since then, I've noticed that he's been losing A LOT of weight and I'm extremely conserned. Any ideas what it could be?
    I am making a vet appt. regardless, but I'm just curious...

    Thanks! =)
    -Nope, no thyroid surgery.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm so sorry your dear cat is losing weight . That is a cause for concern and I am so glad you are a conscientious person and a good friend to him and get him vet care when he needs it.

      It would help to know if there are other symptoms. The main question is, is he losing weight because he doesnt'feel like eating as much? Or is he losing weight despite eating the same amount or more than he was before? .
      Also has he recently changed food? Change in activity level? How much is he drinking? Any change in defecation or urination? (like Does he have diarrhea or loose stools? Is he urinating a lot?)

      The main question is the first - - is he losing weight despite eating as much (or especially, eating MORE than usual). In that case, the possibilities that come to mind are (as it sounds like you know) the metabolic disorders you mentioned that he tested negative for ca. 2 months ago - - hyperthyroidism and diabetes mellitus. It seems like hyper-T can seem to start rather suddenly, I would check thyroid levels again, and check into the possibility that even if it came out fine on a test, what exactly did that mean? i.e. was it borderline? Some cats seem to be affected at levels not technically in the hyper-T range.

      With diabetes often they have been diabetic for some months by the time they start losing weight from it. But it is not impossible for it to have a more sudden onset, especially if he was on steroids? [Actually, though. my own cat became diabetic just after a dental and I have heard some others say this happened to their cats. BUT, I have not been able to find out any known connection, and it could be pure coincidence since out of a large number of diabetic cats, a certain number will have recently had dental procedures.

      If he is your only cat (and you don't have other pets who eat cat food) I would think youd notice if he were eating less. But in a multiple cat house, it can really take a while to realize one is eating less especially if the others compensate for him.

      Something serious that results in weight loss is kidney disease which is a problem for many older cats. If he does, it is almost certain he would be drinking a lot and peeing a lot. (that is also true for diabetes; the difference is with weight loss with kidney disease they are not eating as much, they lose their appetite. In the most common tests, for BUN and Creatinine, there is no sign of a problem until they've lost 70% of kidney function! However, they are catching it earlier now though, with some newer tests that detect a sign of compromised kidney function much earlier, and cats are living for years.
      For any cat his age, I would recommend having a urine test for microalbuminuria done. Even if positive in one test, it is determined more significant if positive in a repeat test in ca 3 weeks.
      .
      If he has some other mouth sore or dental problem it may make eating too painful.
      I also wonder if bacteria released at the time he was treated for the abcess could have triggered some infection. It is not entirely unheard of. Did he have antibiotics before and after the abcess was treated?

      I would very much recommend for his health in general that you feed him a low carb, high-protein, grain-free wet diet, which can help lessen the chance of both diabetes and kidney & urinary tract diseases/ disorders. (I would also add a little warm water to the food to make sure he is adequately hydrated.) It also makes it much easier to know if a cat is eating less than if you keep a bowl of dry food filled all the time without measuring.

      Good luck, and I hope he will be OK

  27. QUESTION:
    What causes a Very light period?
    My period has been real weird this month. First there was 1 day where I thought I got my period but it ended the next day. Now 2 weeks after that I've had my period since Monday but its very very light all I need is a panty liner. What could cause this?
    Oh I am not on any type of birth control.

    • ANSWER:
      Causes

      Both internal as well as external factors can trigger light periods in women. Some of the most commonly found reasons are explained here:

      Hormonal Imbalance
      One of the most prevalent causes of a light period is hormonal imbalance where the woman's body start producing excess amounts of the male hormone testosterone and less amount of the female hormones estrogen. Lack of sufficient estrogen tends to thin up the lining of the uterus which results in lighter menstrual flow.

      Menopause
      During menopause, the ovaries do not produce enough reproductive hormones like estrogen and progesterone and create a hormonal imbalance. As a result, menstrual flow decreases over a period of time before it comes to a complete halt. During this phase, menopausal women experience lighter period than usual and it is absolutely normal.

      Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)
      In this condition, small cysts are formed inside the ovaries and this causes various menstrual abnormalities. In some months a woman may get heavy bleeding during period and in others it will be a lighter flow. They may even miss periods in some months. Such irregularities of period are accompanied by pelvic pain and nausea.

      Birth Control Pills
      If you are getting lighter periods after starting a new birth control pill, then it could be that pill responsible for that condition. The hormone present in these pills tends to bring about some changes in your body. As a result, the duration of the menstrual cycle and the blood flow during periods may decrease within the first few months.

      Pregnancy
      Yes, the possibility of pregnancy cannot be ruled out. When you get a light period all of a sudden and there are some early pregnancy symptoms like morning sickness, take a pregnancy test as soon as possible. Even though it is rare but there are some women who get light menstrual spotting in their first month of pregnancy.

      Stress
      Mental stress often has an adverse effect on the menstruation. If you are under a lot of stress, just before the onset of your monthly period, it is likely that you get a light period. This is because your body assumes it is an emergency and diverts the blood flow to the brain, lungs and other vital organs of the body to ensure normal body functioning. Once the stress levels go down, normal flow of period is restored.

      Excessive Physical Exertion
      Women athletes are prone to lighter periods because of their rigorous physical training sessions. When their physical activities are less intense, the menstrual flow usually returns to normal. Non athlete women may get lighter period after too much of exercising or traveling.

      Other Reasons
      Young girls and women who eat less to maintain a low body weight often get light periods. This happens because the lack of nutrition and low body weight affect production of hormones in the body. Those women who are suffering from chronic health problems such as diabetes or osteoporosis can have this kind of problem. It can be triggered by thyroid problems or as a side effect of certain medicines.

      Diagnosis and Treatment

      If you get it once in a while, then you may not require any treatment. However, other cases, require thorough investigation by your gynecologist. They conduct physical examination, blood test and Pap test to ascertain the cause. They may also conduct a pregnancy test, if required. Your lifestyle and medical history is also taken into account. The treatment then depends on the reasons for light periods. Change in diet and lifestyle is recommended in most cases. Stress reduction is also important to keep the menstrual flow normal. When strenuous physical activities causes this problem, the doctor may suggest you to cut down on your training sessions. Ovarian cysts are often treated with birth control pills and other medicines containing synthetic hormones. Women who have high levels of testosterone may have to undergo androgen therapy.

      If you suspect that something is wrong, there's no need to press the panic button unnecessarily. Visit a gynecologist for check up. Conditions that lead to light periods are treatable and are not always an indication of some major gynecological problem. However, to avoid any further complications, it is best to seek medical help as soon as you sense something is wrong.

  28. QUESTION:
    Can the 1st day of period starts with a very light discharge of menstrual fluid?

    Plz reply

    • ANSWER:
      Both internal as well as external factors can trigger light periods in women. Some of the most commonly found reasons are explained here:

      Hormonal Imbalance
      One of the most prevalent causes of a light period is hormonal imbalance where the woman's body start producing excess amounts of the male hormone testosterone and less amount of the female hormones estrogen. Lack of sufficient estrogen tends to thin up the lining of the uterus which results in lighter menstrual flow.

      Menopause
      During menopause, the ovaries do not produce enough reproductive hormones like estrogen and progesterone and create a hormonal imbalance. As a result, menstrual flow decreases over a period of time before it comes to a complete halt. During this phase, menopausal women experience lighter period than usual and it is absolutely normal.

      Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)
      In this condition, small cysts are formed inside the ovaries and this causes various menstrual abnormalities. In some months a woman may get heavy bleeding during period and in others it will be a lighter flow. They may even miss periods in some months. Such irregularities of period are accompanied by pelvic pain and nausea.

      Birth Control Pills
      If you are getting lighter periods after starting a new birth control pill, then it could be that pill responsible for that condition. The hormone present in these pills tends to bring about some changes in your body. As a result, the duration of the menstrual cycle and the blood flow during periods may decrease within the first few months.

      Pregnancy
      Yes, the possibility of pregnancy cannot be ruled out. When you get a light period all of a sudden and there are some early pregnancy symptoms like morning sickness, take a pregnancy test as soon as possible. Even though it is rare but there are some women who get light menstrual spotting in their first month of pregnancy.

      Stress
      Mental stress often has an adverse effect on the menstruation. If you are under a lot of stress, just before the onset of your monthly period, it is likely that you get a light period. This is because your body assumes it is an emergency and diverts the blood flow to the brain, lungs and other vital organs of the body to ensure normal body functioning. Once the stress levels go down, normal flow of period is restored.

      Excessive Physical Exertion
      Women athletes are prone to lighter periods because of their rigorous physical training sessions. When their physical activities are less intense, the menstrual flow usually returns to normal. Non athlete women may get lighter period after too much of exercising or traveling.

      Other Reasons
      Young girls and women who eat less to maintain a low body weight often get light periods. This happens because the lack of nutrition and low body weight affect production of hormones in the body. Those women who are suffering from chronic health problems such as diabetes or osteoporosis can have this kind of problem. It can be triggered by thyroid problems or as a side effect of certain medicines.

  29. QUESTION:
    What is thyroid? Is it dangerous disease? What are the side effects? How to cure thyroid?

    • ANSWER:
      What is the Thyroid?
      The thyroid is a small gland, shaped like a butterfly, located in the lower part of your neck. The function of a gland is to secrete hormones. The main hormones released by the thyroid are triiodothyronine, abbreviated as T3, and thyroxine, abbreviated as T4. These thyroid hormones deliver energy to cells of the body.

      What Diseases and Conditions Affect the Thyroid?

      The most common problems that develop in the thyroid include:

      Hypothyroidism -- An underactive thyroid.
      Hyperthyroidism -- An overactive thyroid.
      Goiter -- An enlarged thyroid.
      Thyroid Nodules -- Lumps in the thyroid gland.
      Thyroid Cancer -- Malignant thyroid nodules or tissue.
      Thyroiditis -- Inflammation of the thyroid.

      Hypothyroidism
      When the thyroid gland is underactive, improperly formed at birth, surgically removed all or in part, or becomes incapable of producing enough thyroid hormone, a person is said to be hypothyroid. One of the most common causes of hypothyroidism is the autoimmune disease called Hashimoto's disease, in which antibodies gradually target the thyroid and destroy its ability to produce thyroid hormone.

      Symptoms of hypothyroidism usually go along with a slowdown in metabolism, and can include fatigue, weight gain, and depression, among others.

      Hyperthyroidism
      When the thyroid gland becomes overactive and produces too much thyroid hormone, a person is said to be hyperthyroid. The most common cause of hyperthyroidism is the autoimmune condition known as Graves' disease, where antibodies target the gland and cause it to speed up hormone production.

      Autoimmune Thyroid Disease
      Most thyroid dysfunction such as hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism is due to autoimmune thyroid disease. Autoimmune disease refers to a condition where the body's natural ability to differentiate between its tissues, organs and glands, vs. outside bacteria, viruses or pathogens, becomes disrupted. This causes the immune system to wrongly mount an attack on the affected area, by producing antibodies. In the case of autoimmune thyroid disease, antibodies either gradually destroy the thyroid, or make it overactive.

      Goiter/Thyroid Nodules
      Sometimes the thyroid becomes enlarged -- due to Hashimoto's disease, Graves' disease, nutritional deficiencies, or other thyroid imbalances. When the thyroid become enlarged, this is known as a goiter.

      Some people develop solid or liquid filled cysts, lumps, bumps and tumors -- both benign and cancerous -- in the thyroid gland. These are known as thyroid nodules.

      Thyroid Cancer
      A small percentage of thyroid nodules are cancerous. While thyroid cancer is a rare cancer, it's on the rise.

      Thyroid cancer, especially early in its development, may not cause any symptoms at all.
      But as a thyroid cancer grows and develops, it is more likely to cause symptoms. Some of the symptoms that may point to thyroid cancer include the following:

      A lump, or nodule in the neck -- especially in the front of the neck, in the area of the Adam's apple. (Note: Sometimes, the lump or nodule will be growing quickly.) (Find out how to do a Thyroid Neck Check to look for lumps or enlargement.)

      Enlargement of the neck

      Enlarged lymph nodes in the neck

      Hoarseness, difficulty speaking normally, voice changes

      Difficulty swallowing, or a choking feeling

      Difficulty breathing

      Pain in the neck or throat, including pain from the neck to the ears

      Sensitivity in the neck -- discomfort with neckties, turtlenecks, scarves, necklaces

      Persistent or chronic cough not due to allergies or illness

      Asymmetry in the thyroid (big nodule on one side, nothing on the other)

      Nodules that when manipulated give the impression that the entire thyroid is moving (this is often a sign of an aggressive cancer)

      Nodules that cause the wind pipe to go to one side of the neck, as well as cause superior vena cava syndrome

      Some particularly aggressive thyroid tumors can go to the brain and cause neurological symptoms

      Diagnosis of thyroid cancer typically involves a number of procedures and tests.

      Physical Exam
      Your doctor should conduct a thorough physical exam, including palpation of your thyroid to feel for enlargement and lumps, as well as the gland's size and firmness. The doctor will also look for any enlarged lymph nodes in your neck.
      Find out more about what is involved in a thorough clinical examination of the thyroid.

      Biopsy
      Doctors often biopsy suspicious thyroid nodules, to evaluate for potential cancer. Typically thyroid nodules are biopsied using a needle, in a procedure known as "fine needle aspiration biopsy" -- sometimes abbreviated FNA. Some patients have a surgical biopsy, where the nodule, or the thyroid gland itself, is removed surgically.
      This Q&A on Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid has detailed information on the procedure.

      Imaging Tests
      A variety of imaging scans are used to evaluate thyroid nodules

      NOTE:
      Kelsey, you have a tremendous amount of misconceptions in your post - mostly being very negative & going to extremes i.e. saying that if your thyroid is not working you have cancer, once you find out you have Thyroid Cancer it is basically too late to do much, etc. Most people survive this disease. Just because you are a nursing student doesn't mean you know it all. Before you post an answer, make sure you know what you are talking about. You can upset a lot of people with your information.

  30. QUESTION:
    My wife is 40 and has a resting heart rate of 90 + migrains and sleeplessness What could be the problem ?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,

      You say "the problem," and I agree hat it would be nice if we could tie all of your wife's 3 symptoms, into just one diagnosis. For two reasons, firstly that if we could, we would be more likely to be right, (as you know, that principle is called "Occam's Razor"), - and also that there would be only one treatment, not 3 treatments.

      I think we can only say that for some reason, your wife's heart is under strain, and specifically is having to "keep up" a sufficient blood circulation by beating faster than normal. There could be a few things that her heart is "struggling" against, from irregularity of the heart-beat, under-strength blood (anaemia), weakness of the heart muscles, dilation of the heart, valve obstruction or infection inside the heart, high blood pressure, physically obstructed arteries (arteriosclerosis or blood-clots), to arterial spasm. Too, some medications for other things, can increase the heart rate.

      Lung diseases can also put the heart under strain, since the heart then has to compensate for the poor lung function. Similarly obesity, for the same reason.

      An over-active thyroid gland, can increase the heart-rate.

      I think the only one of those that "fits" with migraine is "arterial spasm," since that is also the localized cause of migraines. In a full-blown migraine, the brain arteries suddenly decide to go into spasm, thereby reducing the blood-flow to the brain tissue. First the sufferer gets some localized restriction of brain function, (the "warning" or "aura,"), then the severe pain which is caused by the arterial spasm relaxing again, - and the blood coming pounding through.

      I would have thought that sleeplessness more often has a psychological, than a physical cause. Difficulty getting off to sleep, is often associated with worry and anxiety; whereas awakening in the early hours or very early morning, from sleep, is more often associated with depression.

      We would be looking for associated symptoms to found a diagnosis of depression, - such as lack of interest in life, low energy, off food, weight loss, low mood, mood-swings during the day.

      I suppose that general anxiety and tension can cause (1) a quickened pulse, (2) migraine headaches, and (3) sleeplessness, - but I would insist that other more definitely physical, causes are ruled out, before coming to a diagnosis like that.

      Similarly, with regard to the cardio-vascular system, we need to ask for other symptoms of the heart being under strain. These would be: shortness of breath on effort, shortness of breath on lying flat in bed, coughing up blood, ankle swelling ?

      I would suggest that your wife needs a thorough examination, and further tests. I will not suggest what these should be, as you haven't asked that.

      I hope this is of some help.

      Best wishes,

      Belliger
      retired uk gp

  31. QUESTION:
    My best friend has thyroid problems (hypothyroidism). What will happen to her?
    My friend is very concerned, almost hysterical about her condition. What will happen to her? I want to help her, but I need more information (she doesn't know where to look). She has been told that she seems to have all the symptoms (nervosity, abundant sweat, can't lose weight, can't breathe well), and she is 17 yeras old. How will her condition affect her and her everyday life and what can she do about it? Will she have any dietary restrictions? please give me some information about her condition. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      these are actually syptoms of hyperthyroidism. check your other question regarding it. but here is information on hypothyroidism as well.

      Hypothyroidism is the disease state caused by insufficient production of thyroid hormone by the thyroid gland. There are several distinct causes for chronic hypothyroidism, the most common being Hashimoto's thyroiditis and hypothyroidism following radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism.

      The severity of hypothyroidism varies widely. Patients are classified as "subclinical hypothyroid" if diagnostic findings show thyroid hormone abnormalities, but they do not exhibit any symptoms. Others have moderate symptoms that can be mistaken for other diseases and states. Advanced hypothyroidism may cause severe complications, the most serious one of which is myxedema.

      Signs and symptoms

      Adults
      Slowed speech and a hoarse, breaking voice. Deepening of the voice can also be noticed.
      Impaired memory
      Impaired cognitive function (brain fog)
      Urticaria (hives)
      Migraine headache
      Increased sensitivity to heat and cold
      A slow heart rate with ECG changes including low voltage signals. Diminished cardiac output and decreased contractility.
      Pericardial effusions may occur.
      Sluggish reflexes
      Dry puffy skin, especially on the face, and hair loss, especially thinning of the outer 1/3 of the eyebrows
      Depression (especially in the elderly)
      Weight gain and obesity
      Anemia caused by impaired hemoglobin synthesis (decreased EPO levels), impaired intestinal iron and folate absorption or B12 deficiency from pernicious anemia
      Slowed metabolism
      Constipation
      Fatigue (physical)
      Choking sensation or difficulty swallowing
      Shortness of breath with a shallow and slow respiratory pattern.
      Impaired ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and hypoxia.
      Increased need for sleep
      Muscle cramps and joint pain
      Decreased sex drive
      Brittle fingernails
      Osteoporosis
      Paleness
      Irritability
      Yellowing of the skin due to impaired conversion of beta-carotene to vitamin A
      Abnormal menstrual cycles
      Impaired renal function with decreased GFR.
      Thin, fragile or absent cuticles
      Infertility or difficulty becoming pregnant
      Elevated serum cholesterol
      Acute psychosis (myxedema madness) is a rare presentation of hypothyroidism
      weak muscles

      Children

      Very Early Infancy
      Feeding problems
      Constipation
      Hoarseness
      Excessive sleepiness
      Protruding tongue
      Puffy appearance of hands and feet
      Deaf mutism

      Later Infancy/Toddlerhood
      Protruding abdomen
      Rough, dry skin
      Delayed teething

      After Toddlerhood
      Lack of normal growth
      Abnormally short for age on height/weight charts
      Puffy, bloated appearance
      Below-normal intelligence for age

      Causes

      Neonatal hypothyroidism
      Thyroid hormone is very important to neural development in the neonatal period. A deficiency of thyroid hormones can lead to cretinism. For this reason it is important to detect and treat thyroid deficiency early. In Australia, the Netherlands, and many other countries this is done by testing for TSH on the routine neonatal heel pricks performed by law on all newborn babies.

      Hashimoto's thyroiditis
      Sometimes called Hashimoto's Disease, this is part of the spectrum of autoimmune diseases and is related to Graves' disease, lymphocytic thyroiditis, and other organ-related autoimmune conditions such as Addison's disease, diabetes, premature menopause and vitiligo. Hashimoto's is a lymphocytic and plasmacytic thyroid inflammation that eventually destroys the thyroid. Patients require permanent thyroid hormone replacement.

      Autoimmune hypothyroidism may also be part of a spectrum of disorders referred to as Schmidt's syndrome:

      Hypothyroidism
      Pernicious anemia
      Diabetes mellitus
      Adrenal insufficiency
      Thyroid surgery for this has generally been a sub-total thyroidectomy. A large reason for this is the risk of destroying the parathyroids in a total thyroidectomy. If insufficient thyroid tissue remains to produce normal requirements then supplementary thyroxine is required.

      Pituitary failure
      Reduction or loss of TSH secretion by the pituitary is a rare cause of hypothyroidism. This constellation is usually referred to as "secondary hypothyroidism". Even rarer is tertiary hypothyroidism that is caused either by hypothalamic lesions or by interruption of signal transfer in the portal veins connecting the hypothalamus to the pituitary gland (Pickardt syndrome).

      Iatrogenic
      Hypothyroidism may occur as an adverse reaction to lithium used in the treatment of mood disorders, and in response to interferon and IL-2 treatment (e.g. for cancer). It may also be a result of the antiarrhythmic amiodarone.

      Iodine deficiency
      Severe iodine deficiency is another major cause of hypothyroidism. In areas of the world where there is an iodine deficiency in the diet, severe hypothyroidism can be seen in 5 to 15% of the population. In many countries, iodine deficiency is very rare due to the small amount of iodine salt that is added to common table salt.

      Surgery on the thyroid is generally done in a form that allows some hormone-producing tissue to remain. Nevertheless, some patients will need hormone supplementation after surgery.

      Treatment
      Myxedema coma
      Myxedema coma is a medical emergency. The major imbalances are hypoglycemia, hyponatremia, hypothermia and acute renal failure. The initial management includes warming the patient, monitoring the vitals. Parenteral steroids is the initial drug (injection hydrocortisone 100 mg - 200 mg) given. Levothyroxine 600 micrograms is given through nasogastric tube or parenteral route.

      Hypothyroidism
      Clinically apparent hypothyroidism usually warrants treatment, and there is evidence that treating subclinical hypothyroidism is indicated to slow long-term consequences, such as atherosclerosis. In case the hypothyroidism is due to dietary minerals and iodine, supplementation with these may obviate the need for hormonal treatment, but only if iodine deficiency has been documented, which is very rare in the Western world.

      Treatment is usually with levothyroxine (starting at 50 μg/day), a synthetic thyroxine analogue. There is no evidence suggesting that there is any need to substitute T3 as well[1][2].

      Symptoms as well as TSH levels are used to monitor effect of substitution; a high TSH level suggests treatment is not yet adequate and that dose adjustments are necessary. A low ("suppressed") TSH may indicate the dose is too high. Some patients prefer a pig thyroid extract, natural desiccated thyroid hormones, which contains T3 as well as T4 and traces of T2, T1 and calcitonin.

  32. QUESTION:
    what is the name of medical condition and the treatment of the abnormal body temperature of below 95.4 for a s
    if a patient has a abnormal body temperature of 94.8 or 95.4 daily and has the medical condition of systemic lupus what is the name of this medical condition and what is the treatment plan for being so cold everyday and not being able to get warm

    • ANSWER:
      Wilson's Syndrome?

      Wilson’s Syndrome is a state of chronic low body temperature. It may be genetic, or triggered by stress or inactivity, as well as diet, selenium or zinc deficiency, heavy metals and starvation. It seems to be part of the body's way to conserve fuel. Wilson’s Syndrome occurs when someone drops into this ‘conservation’ mode and is not able to later recover back to the normal ‘productive’ mode of functioning. An interesting side note is that Dr. Fahrenheit considered normal body temperature to be 100F. Some say the present average temperature is 98.2, and may be as much as 1 1/2 degrees lower than it was 150 years ago. A common time of death is in the very early morning, when the body temperature is at its lowest. Wilson's Temperature Syndrome is another name for this condition and is probably a better name for it.

      The difficulty arises when these low metabolism conditions continue for too long, various repair functions are deferred too long, and the body begins to show signs and symptoms. For every degree of body temperature lost, biochemists say the loss in efficiency of enzymatic processes can be up to 20%. Chronic low body temperature is related to many syndromes and symptoms, including: allergies, apathy, chronic fatigue, "brain fog", "personal failure", depression, dizziness, hypoglycemia, lethargy, passive/aggressive syndromes, skin and joint conditions, sleep disorders, sexual dysfunction, past sexual abuse, yeast problems, porphyria, and many other poorly defined chronic low health states. Obviously, not all chronic problems are related to chronic low body temperature; but it would be prudent to measure one's body temperature from time to time to see if this is a possibility.

      Hypopituitarism (low functioning pituitary) and hypothyroidism (low functioning thyroid) can both result in deficient production of T4, which is the raw material the body uses to produce the active thyroid hormone T3. Your doctor should be able to help determine which medications are best for you.

      The treatment of choice preferred by conventional doctors is T4 (Synthroid) because of its long half-life in the body (which helps provide steady T3 levels), once-a-day administration, and usefulness in the treatment of such cases. Patients with hypopituitarism and hypothyroidism may, however, suffer with Wilson's Syndrome at the same time. In such cases, T4 therapy may not be adequate because impaired conversion of the T4 to the active compound T3 may prevent sufficient normalization of body temperature patterns, and, in some cases, can even feed the vicious cycle of Wilson's Syndrome. The simultaneous use of T4 with T3 may be the best approach for hypothyroidism, especially if Wilson’s Syndrome is suspected. Many doctors prefer using the standard T4/T3 combination found in desiccated thyroid products such as Armour thyroid and other generic brands. Additional adjustments in the T4/T3 ratio can be made to meet the needs of individual patients. Apart from their T3 content, glandular preparations like Armour also contain T1 and T2 which may have some function, as yet undiscovered, contributing to benefits seen when using these preparations compared to T4 use alone.
      http://www.digitalnaturopath.com/cond/C20313.html

  33. QUESTION:
    Trouble waking up - Sickness, Headache, Fatigue and Dizzyness?
    For as long as I can remember, I have had difficulty waking up. I always had problems when in school and high-school (Well that's reasonable as your body needs lots of sleep and is still developing and growing), but now I'm 26 and no matter what length of sleep I have, more or less, I always feel sick and dizzy upon waking.

    My symptoms are:
    - Sick feeling in my stomach (Like if you have some food, then fall sleep and wake up a couple of hours later abruptly.)
    - Dizzyness
    - Bad Temper
    - Tiredness until the early afternoon, difficulties concentrating.
    - Sometimes feeling hung-over even if I haven't had alcohol in days.
    - If I'm woken abruptly; sometimes that 'gasping awake sensation'.
    - Heart racing for a few seconds after I wake up.

    I usually set about 10 alarms on my phone (with different alarm sounds/songs) ranging from 1/2hr before I have to get up to 1/2hr after.... All of which I semi-consciously snooze or turn off completely. So I oversleep and am on the verge of losing my job. LITERALLY!!

    I know it's not just a problem with the Winter, (although it certainly does make it worse) or my bed or house as I have the same problems whichever time of the year, bed or country I'm in.

    I had blood tests for Iron Deficiency and Thyroid Function, both came out slightly abnormal (Low Iron and High TSH levels), but I've had tests since and they're now normal.

    I don't think it's dehydration as I drink 2-3 pints of water a day when I'm at work, plus lots of decaf tea through the day, and one or two caffeinated coffees (although I try not to drink caffeine too late in the afternoon.

    I'm not overweight, I'm just under 9 1/2 stone and 5ft 6.

    I'm not sure if the doctor would do / suggest anything and I've been to the far Doctors too many times this year and am starting to feel like a hypochondriac! :(

    I usually go to sleep between 10.30pm - 1pm and don't usually have problems falling asleep.

    I don't seem to wake up in the night unless I need to go to the toilet.

    I don't usually snore, although I've been told on a couple of rare occasions that I have done, gently.

    I don't think it's stress as I'm not over-thinking all that much in the night, although now this issue really is affecting my work life and is making me feel depressed when I walk into work late every day. (Today I was over an hour late) I even didn't go to work for a few days out of embarrassment for my lateness-es and I gave in to my body and apparently my natural wake up time looks like it's between 9.30am - 11am.
    Not helpful when you have a 9-5 office job.

    Any suggestions would be helpful, especially from Doctor-types. :)

    • ANSWER:
      Given the history of your symptoms and the severity of it's implications, you most probably have a deep seated myalendocrytonic reverberation located in the higher part of your brain stem. Basically, your body sends a signal to your brain when it needs to sleep, then when you've slept, it stops sending that message. What's happened here is that your body hasn't stopped sending this message after you sleep, it just lessens the impact of it. There's a lot of medical cortex feedback loops associated with this illness, but it would take far too long to explain.
      Your brain is not the problem here, your body is. I recommend a deep tissue expungancy procedure. It's almost completely harmless, very little risk. It involves inserting a probing camera into your digestive track rectally so the problem can be found. You know what they say, the anus is the window to the soul! Once deep enough within your body cavity, the probe will emit a friendly burst of gamma rays, killing not only the cells that are causing the feedback loop. You may feel a slight disintegrating pain if your nerve fibres haven't become less than useless strings of jelly like sludge. Hopefully though, we can terminate your unwanted child before it effects your daily work schedule. And with any luck, you'll make a recovery. Maybe even a full one. I honestly don't know, as I'm not a doctor, I fix vacuum cleaners.

  34. QUESTION:
    Any way to treat Hypoglycemia at home??
    I have been having trouble lately with my low blood sugar, anyone have any tips?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Mary

      Here are some ideas to use.

      Cause
      Hypoglycemia can be caused by excess consumption of simple sugars and refined carbohydrates, food allergies, low thyroid function, nutrient deficiencies (especially vitamin B6, chromium, zinc, essential fatty acids and amino acids such as alanine), excessive exercise, stress, skipped meals (especially breakfast), irregular eating habits, excessive alcohol, drug, or cigarette consumption, over consumption of caffeine beverages, poor protein digestion, protein deficiency, poor digestion due to other factors, low digestive enzymes, low fiber diets, and an excessively refined and processed diet. To achieve lasting relief of hypoglycemia symptoms, all of these factors must be screened for and addressed.

      Chronic muscular tension caused by stress throughout the body, particularly in the spinal regions, is another potential cause of hypoglycemia, since stressed body tissues burn fuel at a higher than normal rate, creating a constant need for glucose.

      Caution: Although hypoglycemia can exist by itself, it may be an early warning sign for pancreatic and diabetic problems. If your condition persists, seek immediate medical attention.

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Natural Cures

      Diet: Be sure to have breakfast and make it a protein rich meal. Also eat smaller, more frequent meals throughout the day to help keep blood glucose levels up and to help heal the pancreas and adrenals. Be sure your diet consists of organic, whole foods diet and avoid stressor foods such as caffeine, refined sugars, and alcohol. Instead, emphasize fibrous foods, whole grains, seeds, nuts, fermented dairy products, and lean meats and fish. Also be sure to identify and avoid food allergies, and eliminate processed foods, dehydrated powders, and white flour products.

      Herbs: Licorice, burdock, and dandelion can help to regulate blood sugar levels.

      Juice Therapy: Combine the juice of carrot, beet, burdock root, Jerusalem artichoke, and garlic and drink an 8-ounce glass once or twice a day.

      Nutritional Supplementation: The following nutrients can be helpful in preventing and reversing hypoglycemia: chromium, vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, niacin or niacinimide, pantothenic acid, vitamin C with bioflavonoids, calcium, magnesium zinc, trace minerals, free-form amino acids, and adrenal glandulars. If hypoglycemia is due to incomplete absorption of nutrients from food, take hydrochloric acid (HCL) and digestive enzymes. Vitamin B injections can also be helpful as a means of increasing energy levels.

      Alternative Professional Care: If your symptoms persist despite the above measures, seek the help of a qualified health professional. The following professional care therapies have all been shown to be useful for treating hypoglycemia: Acupuncture, Applied Kinesiology, Biofeedback Training, Chiropractic, Environmental Medicine, Homeopathy, Magnetic Field Therapy, Naturopathic Medicine, Orthomolecular Medicine, Osteopathy, Qigong, Reflexology, and Traditional Chinese Medicine.

      Best of health to you

  35. QUESTION:
    Why Do We Have Body Odor?
    just curious?

    Why and what purpose does it serve?

    Do older people have body odor too like young people?

    • ANSWER:
      Your skin has two types of sweat glands: eccrine glands and apocrine glands. Eccrine glands occur over most of your body and open directly onto the surface of your skin. Apocrine glands develop in areas abundant in hair follicles, such as on your scalp, armpits and groin.

      You have between 2 million and 5 million eccrine sweat glands. When your body temperature rises, your autonomic nervous system stimulates these glands to secrete fluid onto the surface of your skin, where it cools your body as it evaporates. This fluid (perspiration) is composed mainly of water and salt (sodium chloride) and contains trace amounts of other electrolytes — substances that help regulate the balance of fluids in your body — as well as substances such as urea.

      Apocrine glands, on the other hand, secrete a fatty sweat directly into the tubule of the gland. When you're under emotional stress, the wall of the tubule contracts and the sweat is pushed to the surface of your skin where bacteria begin breaking it down. Most often, it's the bacterial breakdown of apocrine sweat that causes an odor.

      A number of factors can affect how much you sweat as well as your sweat's smell. Certain foods, drugs or medical conditions can cause excessive sweating, whereas drugs or conditions may interfere with your ability to perspire normally.

      Excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis)
      Some people sweat more than others for no apparent reason. But some factors may make you sweat heavily. These include:

      Heredity. Some people inherit a tendency to sweat excessively, especially on their palms and the soles of their feet.
      Certain foods and beverages. Drinking hot beverages and those that contain caffeine or alcohol can make you sweat. Eating spicy foods can, too.
      Certain drugs. Drugs that can cause excessive sweating include some antipsychotic medications used to treat mental disorders, morphine and excess doses of the thyroid hormone thyroxine. Analgesics, such as aspirin and acetaminophen (Tylenol), also increase sweating.
      Menopause. Women going through menopause may experience hot flashes — a rise in temperature accompanied by sweating and a feeling of intense heat — due to a drop in estrogen levels. Some menopausal women may also be awakened at night by soaking sweats followed by chills.
      Low levels of male hormones. Men with low levels of the male hormone testosterone or a condition known as hypogonadism — caused by reduced functioning of the testicles — also can have hot flashes.
      Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). This occurs when the level of sugar in your blood drops below a certain level. It's most common in people with diabetes who take insulin or oral medications that enhance the action of insulin. Early signs and symptoms include sweating, shakiness, weakness, hunger, dizziness and nausea. Some people may develop low blood sugar after eating, especially if they've had stomach or intestinal surgery. In rare cases, your body may produce too much of the pancreatic hormone insulin, leading to low blood sugar.
      Fevers. Fever occurs when your temperature rises above its normal range. You may have a fever with many types of bacterial and viral infections. When your body temperature finally begins to return to normal, known as "breaking of the fever," you may sweat profusely, which is your body's way of dissipating the excess heat. Shaking chills after the fever are your body's attempt to raise its core temperature. Repeated episodes of fever followed by sweating and chills may indicate a serious infection or other illness.
      Overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism). Sometimes the thyroid gland produces excess amounts of the hormone thyroxine. This can cause a number of signs and symptoms, including weight loss, a rapid or irregular heartbeat, nervousness and increased sensitivity to heat. It may also cause you to perspire much more than normal.
      Heart attack. This occurs when a loss of blood supply damages or destroys part of your heart muscle. The signs and symptoms of a heart attack include pressure; fullness or squeezing pain in your chest that lasts for a few minutes or pain that extends beyond your chest to your shoulder, arm or back; shortness of breath; and intense sweating. If you experience these symptoms, get immediate medical care. Every minute counts during a heart attack.
      Tuberculosis. In 2002, this chronic bacterial infection of the lungs affected more than 15,000 people in the United States. When left untreated, tuberculosis can be fatal. Among its signs and symptoms are a cough, fever and night sweats.
      Malaria. Malaria affects millions of people worldwide. The disease occurs primarily in tropical and subtropical countries, but just over 1,000 new cases are reported each year in the United States, primarily among people returning from other parts of the world. The signs and symptoms are related to the life cycle of the parasite that causes malaria, and may begin anywhere from eight days to one year after you've been infected. Initially, you may have chills, headache, vomiting and nausea, but as your body temperature falls, you begin to sweat profusely. The cycle may recur every 48 to 72 hours.
      Certain types of cancer. Leukemia and lymphoma can produce unusual sweating patterns.

      Bathe daily. Regular bathing helps keep the number of bacteria on your skin in check.
      Dry your feet thoroughly after you bathe. Microorganisms thrive in the damp spaces between your toes. Use OTC foot powders to help absorb sweat.
      Choose shoes and socks made of natural materials. Shoes made of natural materials, such as leather, can help prevent sweaty feet by allowing your feet to breathe.
      Rotate your shoes. Shoes won't completely dry overnight, so try not to wear the same pair two days in a row if you have trouble with sweaty feet.
      Wear the right socks. Cotton and wool socks help keep your feet dry because they absorb moisture. When you're active, moisture-wicking athletic socks are a good choice.
      Change your socks often. Change socks or hose once or twice a day, drying your feet thoroughly each time. Women may try pantyhose with cotton soles.
      Air your feet. Go barefoot when you can, or at least slip out of your shoes now and then.
      Choose natural-fiber clothing. Wear natural fabrics, such as cotton, wool and silk, which allow your skin to breathe. When you exercise, you might prefer high-tech fabrics that wick moisture away from your skin.
      Apply antiperspirants nightly. At bedtime, apply antiperspirants to sweaty palms or soles of the feet. Try perfume-free antiperspirants.
      Try relaxation techniques. Consider relaxation techniques such as yoga, meditation or biofeedback. These can help you learn to control the stress that triggers perspiration.
      Change your diet. If foods or beverages cause you to sweat more than usual or your perspiration to smell, consider eliminating caffeinated drinks from your diet as well as foods with strong odors, such as garlic and onions.

  36. QUESTION:
    Little pink blood spots after three days of period?
    ~I was just wondering after I took a shower this morning I got out dried off and when I went to put on my panties and pee a little I wiped then pulled them back up only to find wet. I looked and it was kind of pink like discharge. Is that okay after just three days of being on my period? Btw my period is kind of crazy
    ~Oh btw I am 17

    • ANSWER:
      There are various forms of menstrual irregularities that women face from time to time. Light menstrual periods is one of them. The medical term used for light periods is oligomenorrhea. In this condition, women experience lighter flow than her usual periods. Most of the time, even the duration of menstrual period is less. Sometimes, it may lead to missed periods or unpredictable periods. It can happen to women of all age groups but young girls in the adolescent age are more prone to this condition. One of the obvious reasons for light periods is hormonal changes that can be triggered by various factors.

      Causes

      Both internal as well as external factors can trigger light periods in women. Some of the most commonly found reasons are explained here:

      Hormonal Imbalance
      One of the most prevalent causes of a light period is hormonal imbalance where the woman's body start producing excess amounts of the male hormone testosterone and less amount of the female hormones estrogen. Lack of sufficient estrogen tends to thin up the lining of the uterus which results in lighter menstrual flow.

      Menopause
      During menopause, the ovaries do not produce enough reproductive hormones like estrogen and progesterone and create a hormonal imbalance. As a result, menstrual flow decreases over a period of time before it comes to a complete halt. During this phase, menopausal women experience lighter period than usual and it is absolutely normal.

      Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)
      In this condition, small cysts are formed inside the ovaries and this causes various menstrual abnormalities. In some months a woman may get heavy bleeding during period and in others it will be a lighter flow. They may even miss periods in some months. Such irregularities of period are accompanied by pelvic pain and nausea.

      Birth Control Pills
      If you are getting lighter periods after starting a new birth control pill, then it could be that pill responsible for that condition. The hormone present in these pills tends to bring about some changes in your body. As a result, the duration of the menstrual cycle and the blood flow during periods may decrease within the first few months.

      Pregnancy
      Yes, the possibility of pregnancy cannot be ruled out. When you get a light period all of a sudden and there are some early pregnancy symptoms like morning sickness, take a pregnancy test as soon as possible. Even though it is rare but there are some women who get light menstrual spotting in their first month of pregnancy.

      Stress
      Mental stress often has an adverse effect on the menstruation. If you are under a lot of stress, just before the onset of your monthly period, it is likely that you get a light period. This is because your body assumes it is an emergency and diverts the blood flow to the brain, lungs and other vital organs of the body to ensure normal body functioning. Once the stress levels go down, normal flow of period is restored.

      Excessive Physical Exertion
      Women athletes are prone to lighter periods because of their rigorous physical training sessions. When their physical activities are less intense, the menstrual flow usually returns to normal. Non athlete women may get lighter period after too much of exercising or traveling.

      Other Reasons
      Young girls and women who eat less to maintain a low body weight often get light periods. This happens because the lack of nutrition and low body weight affect production of hormones in the body. Those women who are suffering from chronic health problems such as diabetes or osteoporosis can have this kind of problem. It can be triggered by thyroid problems or as a side effect of certain medicines.

      Diagnosis and Treatment

      If you get it once in a while, then you may not require any treatment. However, other cases, require thorough investigation by your gynecologist. They conduct physical examination, blood test and Pap test to ascertain the cause. They may also conduct a pregnancy test, if required. Your lifestyle and medical history is also taken into account. The treatment then depends on the reasons for light periods. Change in diet and lifestyle is recommended in most cases. Stress reduction is also important to keep the menstrual flow normal. When strenuous physical activities causes this problem, the doctor may suggest you to cut down on your training sessions. Ovarian cysts are often treated with birth control pills and other medicines containing synthetic hormones. Women who have high levels of testosterone may have to undergo androgen therapy.

  37. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms and effects of Turner's Syndrome?

    • ANSWER:
      What is Turner syndrome?
      Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition that alters development in females. Women with this condition tend to be shorter than average and are usually unable to conceive a child (infertile) because of an absence of ovarian function. Other features of this condition that can vary among women who have Turner syndrome include: extra skin on the neck (webbed neck), puffiness or swelling (lymphedema) of the hands and feet, skeletal abnormalities, heart defects and kidney problems.

      This condition occurs in about 1 in 2,500 female births worldwide, but is much more common among pregnancies that do not survive to term (miscarriages and stillbirths).

      Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition related to the X chromosome. [ghr.nlm.nih.gov]

      Researchers have not yet determined which genes on the X chromosome are responsible for most signs and symptoms of Turner syndrome. They have, however, identified one gene called SHOX that is important for bone development and growth. Missing one copy of this gene likely causes short stature and skeletal abnormalities in women with Turner syndrome.

      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      What are the symptoms of Turner syndrome?
      Girls who have Turner syndrome are shorter than average. They often have normal height for the first three years of life, but then have a slow growth rate. At puberty they do not have the usual growth spurt.

      Non-functioning ovaries are another symptom of Turner syndrome. Normally a girl's ovaries begin to produce sex hormones (estrogen and progesterone) at puberty. This does not happen in most girls who have Turner syndrome. They do not start their periods or develop breasts without hormone treatment at the age of puberty.

      Even though many women who have Turner have non-functioning ovaries and are infertile, their vagina and womb are totally normal.

      In early childhood, girls who have Turner syndrome may have frequent middle ear infections. Recurrent infections can lead to hearing loss in some cases.

      Girls with Turner Syndrome are usually of normal intelligence with good verbal skills and reading skills. Some girls, however, have problems with math, memory skills and fine-finger movements.

      Additional symptoms of Turner syndrome include the following:
      An especially wide neck (webbed neck) and a low or indistinct hairline.
      A broad chest and widely spaced nipples.
      Arms that turn out slightly at the elbow.
      A heart murmur, sometimes associated with narrowing of the aorta (blood vessel exiting the heart).
      A tendency to develop high blood pressure (so this should be checked regularly).
      Minor eye problems that are corrected by glasses.
      Scoliosis (deformity of the spine) occurs in 10 percent of adolescent girls who have Turner syndrome.
      The thyroid gland becomes under-active in about 10 percent of women who have Turner syndrome. Regular blood tests are necessary to detect it early and if necessary treat with thyroid replacement
      Older or over-weight women with Turner syndrome are slightly more at risk of developing diabetes.
      Osteoporosis can develop because of a lack of estrogen, but this can largely be prevented by taking hormone replacement therapy.
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      How is Turner syndrome diagnosed?
      A diagnosis of Turner syndrome may be suspected when there are a number of typical physical features observed such as webbed neck, a broad chest and widely spaced nipples. Sometimes diagnosis is made at birth because of heart problems, an unusually wide neck or swelling of the hands and feet.

      The two main clinical features of Turner syndrome are short stature and the lack of the development of the ovaries.

      Many girls are diagnosed in early childhood when a slow growth rate and other features are identified. Diagnosis sometimes takes place later when puberty does not occur.

      Turner syndrome may be suspected in pregnancy during an ultrasound test. This can be confirmed by prenatal testing - chorionic villous sampling or amniocentesis - to obtain cells from the unborn baby for chromosomal analysis. If a diagnosis is confirmed prenatally, the baby may be under the care of a specialist pediatrician immediately after birth.

      Diagnosis is confirmed by a blood test, called a karyotype. This is used to analyze the chromosomal composition of the female. More information about this will be discussed in the section "Is Turner syndrome inherited?"

      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      What is the treatment for Turner syndrome?
      During childhood and adolescence, girls may be under the care of a pediatric endocrinologist, who is a specialist in childhood conditions of the hormones and metabolism.

      Growth hormone injections are beneficial in some individuals with Turner syndrome. Injections often begin in early childhood and may increase final adult height by a few inches.

      Estrogen replacement therapy is usually started at the time of normal puberty, around 12 years to start breast development. Estrogen and progesterone are given a little later to begin a monthly 'period,' which is necessary to keep the womb healthy. Estrogen is also given to prevent osteoporosis.

      Babies born with a heart murmur or narrowing of the aorta may need surgery to correct the problem. A heart expert (cardiologist) will assess and follow up any treatment necessary.

      Girls who have Turner syndrome are more likely to get middle ear infections. Repeated infections may lead to hearing loss and should be evaluated by the pediatrician. An ear, nose and throat specialist (ENT) may be involved in caring for this health issue.

      High blood pressure is quite common in women who have Turner syndrome. In some cases, the elevated blood pressure is due to narrowing of the aorta or a kidney abnormality. However, most of the time, no specific cause for the elevation is identified. Blood pressure should be checked routinely and, if necessary, treated with medication. Women who have Turner syndrome have a slightly higher risk of having an under active thyroid or developing diabetes. This should also be monitored during routine health maintenance visits and treated if necessary.

      Regular health checks are very important. Special clinics for the care of girls and women who have Turner syndrome are available in some areas, with access to a variety of specialists. Early preventive care and treatment is very important.

      Almost all women are infertile, but pregnancy with donor embryos may be possible.

      Having appropriate medical treatment and support allows a woman with Turner syndrome to lead a normal, healthy and happy life.
      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Is Turner syndrome inherited?
      Turner syndrome is not usually inherited in families. Turner syndrome occurs when one of the two X chromosomes normally found in women is missing or incomplete. Although the exact cause of Turner syndrome is not known, it appears to occur as a result of a random error during the formation of either the eggs or sperm.

      Humans have 46 chromosomes, which contain all of a person's genes and DNA. Two of these chromosomes, the sex chromosomes, determine a person's gender. Both of the sex chromosomes in females are called X chromosomes. (This is written as XX.) Males have an X and a Y chromosome (written as XY). The two sex chromosomes help a person develop fertility and the sexual characteristics of their gender.

      In Turner syndrome, the girl does not have the usual pair of two complete X chromosomes. The most common scenario is that the girl has only one X chromosome in her cells. Some girls with Turner syndrome do have two X chromosomes, but one of the X chromosomes is incomplete. In another scenario, the girl has some cells in her body with two X chromosomes, but other cells have only one. This is called mosaicism.

  38. QUESTION:
    My doctor says I have a sligthly underactive thyroid, because my tsh level is 7.25. What does this mean?
    I can't find a scale to explain what this means. How does this compare to someone whose thyroid is more underactive?

    • ANSWER:
      The normal laboratory range for TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) is around .3-3.0 according to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Anything above that level is considered an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism), and anything below an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism).

      At first, it seems puzzling as to why a high level of something could mean something else is UNDERactive, but here's how it works.

      In your brain, the region known as the hypothalamus keeps close tabs on the level of thyroid hormones (T4 and T3) in your blood. When levels of T3 and T4 become less than optimal, the hypothalamus releases a messenger called TRH (thyrotropin releasing hormone). The pituitary gland contains receptors for TRH, which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone). TSH then goes to the thyroid gland, telling it to produce more T4 and T3.

      Therefore, when there are low levels of T4 and T3 in the blood, more TRH is produced, and thus more TSH is produced. Measuring TSH is a very indirect way of assessing thyroid function, but it does seem to work pretty well.

      Your hypothyroidism seems to be quite mild. When I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism, my TSH was 32.71. Still, the best course of action would be medicinal treatment.

      You will probably be prescribed levothyroxine sodium in the form of Synthroid or Levoxyl or a generic equivalent. This is a simple pill (or two) that you take first thing in the morning before breakfast. You should definitely take it, because if you don't, you are at risk for all kinds of nasty thyroid symptoms such as hair loss, weight gain, depression, dry skin, and infertility. It is fairly inexpensive and is covered by virtually all insurance companies.

      Your doctor will want to evaluate your progress fairly frequently in the beginning until he or she is sure that you are on the correct dose. After your dose is properly titrated (evened out), your doctor will likely only want to do bloodwork once every six months or so just to make sure things are still normal. The exception would be if you are female and get pregnant, in which case you should have bloodwork once a month for the duration of your pregnancy.

      Be glad you were caught early and that your doctor is being vigilant about this.

  39. QUESTION:
    why cant i smoke when brestfeeding?
    why doctors allow to smoke 2-3 cigarets a day during pregnancy but forbit it when breastfeeding?

    • ANSWER:
      You can smoke while breastfeeding as long as it is less than 20 cigarettes a day -and obviously don't smoke while holding the baby. It is healthier for mom and baby if mom doesn't smoke but breastfeeding and smoking is still far safer than formula feeding.

      In fact breastfeeding will help reduce the risks that were increased by smoking during pregnancy (like SIDS)

      http://www.kellymom.com/health/lifestyle/smoking.html
      Breastfeeding and Cigarette Smoking

      By Kelly Bonyata, IBCLC

      * Should a mother who smokes cigarettes breastfeed?
      * What happens to babies when they are exposed to cigarette smoke?
      * How does does smoking affect breastfeeding?
      * How to minimize the risk to your baby if you smoke
      * References and More Information

      Should a mother who smokes cigarettes breastfeed?

      First of all, a mom who can't stop smoking should breastfeed. Breastfeeding provides many immunities that help your baby fight illness and can even help counteract some of the effects of cigarette smoke on your baby: for example, breastfeeding has been shown to decrease the negative effects of cigarette smoke on a baby's lungs. It's definitely better if breastfeeding moms not smoke, but if you can't stop or cut down, then it is better to smoke and breastfeed than to smoke and formula feed.

      The more cigarettes that you smoke, the greater the health risks for you and your baby. If you can't stop smoking, or don't want to stop smoking, it's safer for your baby if you cut down on the number of cigarettes that you smoke.

      What happens to babies when they are exposed to cigarette smoke?

      * Babies and children who are exposed to cigarette smoke have a much higher incidence of pneumonia, asthma, ear infections, bronchitis, sinus infections, eye irritation, and croup.
      * Colic occurs more often in babies whose mothers or fathers smoke or if a breastfeeding mother smokes. Researchers believe that not only does the nicotine transferred into mother's milk upset baby but the passive smoke in the home acts as an irritant. Babies of smoking parents fuss more, and mothers who smoke may be less able to cope with a colicky baby (due to lower levels of prolactin).
      * Heavy smoking by breastfeeding moms occasionally causes symptoms in the breastfeeding baby such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps and diarrhea.
      * Babies of smoking mothers and fathers have a seven times greater chance of dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
      * Children of smoking parents have two to three times more visits to the doctor, usually from respiratory infections or allergy-related illnesses.
      * Children who are exposed to passive smoke in the home have lower blood levels of HDL, the good cholesterol that helps protect against coronary artery disease.
      * Children of smoking parents are more likely to become smokers themselves.
      * A recent study found that growing up in a home in which two parents smoked could double the child's risk of lung cancer later in life.

      How does does smoking affect breastfeeding?

      Smoking has been linked to:

      * Earlier weaning. One study showed that the heaviest smokers tend to wean the earliest.
      * Lower milk production
      * Interference with milk let-down
      * Lower levels of prolactin. The hormone prolactin must be present for milk synthesis to occur.
      * One study (Laurberg 2004) indicated that smoking mothers who live in areas of mild to moderate iodine deficiency have less iodine in their breastmilk (needed for baby's thyroid function) compared to nonsmoking mothers. The study authors suggested that breastfeeding mothers who smoke consider taking an iodine supplement.

      Although smoking has been linked to milk production and let-down problems, this may be related to poor lactation management rather than physiological causes. Dr. Lisa Amir, in a review published in 2001, concluded that "Although there is consistent evidence that women who smoke breastfeed their infants for a shorter duration than non-smokers, the evidence for a physiological mechanism is not strong."
      How to minimize the risk to your baby if you smoke

      * The ideal: Stop smoking altogether.
      * Cut down. The less you smoke, the smaller the chance that difficulties will arise. The risks increase if you smoke more than 20 cigarettes per day.
      * Don't smoke immediately before or during breastfeeding. It will inhibit let-down and is dangerous to your baby.
      * Smoke immediately after breastfeeding to cut down on the amount of nicotine in your milk during nursing. Wait as long as possible between smoking and nursing. It takes 95 minutes for half of the nicotine to be eliminated from your body.
      * Avoid smoking in the same room with your baby. Even better, smoke outside, away from your baby and other children. Don't allow anyone else to smoke near your baby.

      This article is dedicated to the memory of my mother-in-law, a long-time smoker who died of lung cancer in January 1999.

  40. QUESTION:
    Any OBGYNs out there? Is there an antidepressant that's safe to take during pregnancy?
    I'm currently on Effexor XR 37.5mg. I've tried to come off of it. When I'm not taking something, I have terrible panic attacks and cannot function. I cry all the time. I want to have a baby. I have moved and have never seen the same gyno more than once. I need to find a permanent one I trust. I've read some things online where some people say it's ok to take it while pregnant, but other doctors say "no way."
    I am ok about not breast feeding. I would breast feed the first day. I know I will have to come of my medicine a few weeks before the due date. I would then go on after the initial breast feeding, then go back and switch to formula.

    • ANSWER:
      There is a lot of emotion and mixed information on this complicated issue. Unfortunately there is no 100% concensus on exactly what to do. There is a general thread of recommendation. SSRI's are first line recommendations in patients who suffer from moderate to severe psychiatric illness, depression and anxiety due to the adverse consequences of untreated illness. There do appear to be some minor complications in a few children who have been exposed to SSRI's at the third trimester. (see below) Further there is the concern of passing the medication through breast milk once the child is born. Some medications are better than others and some simply have not been studied as hard. (like Effexor). I think if you can tolerate Luvox (and it works for you) then that would be one you could take with relative safety and continue to take it through breast feeding.

      Cohen LS, et al published in JAMA that pregnancy is not "protective" with respect to risk of relapse of major depression. Women with histories of depression who are euthymic (normal thyroid) in the context of ongoing antidepressant therapy should be aware of the association of depressive relapse during pregnancy with antidepressant discontinuation.

      Suppaseemanont asserted that current appropriate treatment for pregnant women with moderate and severe depression is antidepressant medication, although there is no consensus on the best antidepressants for use in pregnancy. Thus, the psychotropic drug must be chosen carefully to minimize negative effects on infants and mothers, for some studies have demonstrated deleterious effects on infants.

      Sivojelezova A, et. al. studied Celexa. They concluded that Citalopram (Celexa) use during the period of embryogenesis in pregnancy (early term) is not associated with an apparent major teratogenic risk (birth defect and lost of the baby). Late pregnancy use of citalopram is associated with increased risk of poor neonatal adaptation syndrome, recently described with other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

      These thoughts are echoed with Kalra S in a article trying to arrive at reasonable advice on the subject. Antidepressant use during the third trimester has been associated occasionally with a transient neonatal withdrawal-like syndrome characterized by jitteriness, self-limiting respiratory difficulties, and problems with feeding. When counseling patients, the risk of these adverse effects must be weighed against the risks associated with untreated depression during late pregnancy. Abrupt discontinuation of psychotropic medications has been associated with both physical (eg, withdrawal) and psychological (eg, suicidal thoughts) symptoms.

      Bellantuono C, et al published an article recently. The pregnancy is considered to be relatively high risk period for depressive episodes in women, particularly for those with pre-existing affective disorders. Epidemiological studies indicate that between 10% to 16% of pregnant women fulfil the diagnostic criteria for major depression and on average 20% is affected by an anxiety disorder. Pharmacological treatment of depression during pregnancy, however, brings with it certainties and dilemmas. It has been reported that untreated depression is associated with impaired feto-placental function, premature delivery, miscarriage, low fetal growth and perinatal unwanted effects. On the other hand, the use of antidepressant drugs in pregnancy might be at risk of major malformations (teratogenesis), neonatal toxicity, especially withdrawal symptoms and neuropsychological-behavioural impairment. In addition, the abrupt discontinuation of antidepressants, because of fear for adverse fetal effects, exposes women to serious clinical problems, in particular the disease relapse. A number of reviews indicates that among antidepressant drugs, the older SSRIs (in particular fluoxetine, sertraline, citalopram) seem to be avoided of teratogenic risks; for these reasons such drugs are nowadays considered of choice for the treatment of depression during pregnancy. Less information is available for other drugs, including triciclycs, venlafaxine, mirtazapine, bupropion, escitalopram and duloxetine. Withdrawal symptoms have been reported for all antidepressants; these symptoms, however, were self-limiting in majority of cases and had a favourable outcome. Inconclusive findings emerge, so far, from the few longitudinal studies focusing on the long-term neurodevelopment outcome in children.

      Nordeng H, et al from Norway wanted to explore the passing of medication through breast milk. Data from the literature indicate that the relative dose to the infant is lowest for fluvoxamine and sertraline, somewhat higher for paroxetine and highest for citalopram and fluoxetine. Adverse effects were reported in three of the 119 breastfed infants. Our own results show minimal excretion of fluvoxamine (Luvox), small excretion of paroxetine (Paxil) and higher excretion of citalopram into breast milk. If treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is started during the postpartum period, fluoxetine (Prozac) should not be the first alternative. High doses of citalopram should also be used with caution. However, when the use of an SSRI is clearly indicated in a breastfeeding woman, available data generally indicate that the positive effects of breast-feeding outweigh the risks for pharmacological effects in the infant.

      In a somewhat older article (2001), Altshuler LL, et al. concluded that among antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were recommended as first-line treatment in all situations. The specific SSRIs that were preferred depended on the particular clinical situation. Tricyclic antidepressants were highly rated alternatives to SSRIs in pregnancy and lactation.In evaluating many of the treatment options, the experts had to extrapolate beyond controlled data in comparing treatment options with each other or in combination. Within the limits of expert opinion and with the expectation that future research data will take precedence, these guidelines provide some direction for addressing common clinical dilemmas in women, and can be used to inform clinicians and educate patients regarding the relative merits of a variety of interventions.

      I hope all of this did not overwhelm you too much. I wanted you to see that there are solid studies on this subject that can help guide the decision process. You might want to print all of this out and bring it to your physician for his/her input. Good Luck!!

  41. QUESTION:
    Is this okay for a nurse application?
    From an early age, I have cared and had an interest in the well-being of others; whether it is my mum who has Graves’ hyperthyroidism or my late friend who had a rare heart condition. I have utmost respect for the medical field, particularly the nurses who I perceive as the “unsung heroes”. They have made a monumental contribution to medicine which has inspired me to pursue a career in nursing/healthcare.

    I have had some experience maintaining and monitoring the well-being of others with my mother and grandfather. When my mother had an overactive thyroid due to the aforementioned condition I often had to help take care of her. She experienced symptoms such as panic attacks and night sweat which I helped with. My 86-year-old grandfather has macular degeneration so I have some experience dealing with the elderly, too. I myself have a form of High Function Autism (HFA) known as Asperger’s syndrome but I haven’t let it interfere with my life and I don’t intend on letting it. Despite my Asperger’s I have very good communication skills and I work well in groups. Now that I have my feet wet I’m eager to jump into the deep end.

    Although I have no prior work experience I feel that helping my mother and grandfather has been very beneficial. I have a passion for nursing and healthcare. I am exceptionally eager to learn more and I have burning desire to keep on going. I am from a lower middle class background which has given me a very strong work ethic. I take great pride in helping others and I get an immense feeling of satisfaction when doing so. I am extremely hard working and I always give 100%. I aspire to go onto further education in nursing/healthcare after I gain some experience in the medical field. It would also benefit me greatly if were to get an SVQ 1/2 out of this position.

    • ANSWER:
      it is perfect my mum was a nurse but she did not have asperger's syndrome good luck

  42. QUESTION:
    i had a lipid health panel today and was wondering if someone could help me understand a few things?
    MY RESULTS
    wbc 7.6
    rbc 5.66 high

    sgot(ast) 43.9 high dont know what these two stand for
    sgpt(alt) 54.1 high (if someone does let me know)

    hdl 29.9 low
    tsh 1

    • ANSWER:
      A WBC stnads for White blood count. It is a measure of the number of your white blood cells. White blood cells are a major component of the body's immune system. Indications for a WBC count include infectious and inflammatory diseases; leukemia and lymphoma; and bone marrow disorders.
      The same is for RBC; RBCs contain hemoglobin, which carries oxygen. How much oxygen your body tissues get depends on how many RBCs you have and how well they work. Normal results vary, but in general the range is as follows: female: 4.2 to 5.4 million cells/mcL , so 5066 is a little high. Higher-than-normal numbers of RBCs may be due to:

      Congenital heart disease
      Cor pulmonale
      Dehydration (such as from severe diarrhea)
      Pulmonary fibrosis
      Polycythemia vera

      Drugs can increase the RBC count include:Gentamicin and Methyldopa. You never want to have a RBC that is low...

      An AST blood test measures the amount of the enzyme AST. Alternative Names Aspartate aminotransferase; Serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase; SGOT AST is found in high concentration in heart muscle, liver cells, and skeletal muscle cells. It is also found, to a lesser degree, in other tissues. Although elevated serum AST is not specific for liver disease, it is used primarily to diagnose and monitor the course of liver disease (in combination with other enzymes such as ALT, ALP, and bilirubin). The normal range is 10 to 34 IU/L.

      What Abnormal Results Mean:
      Diseases that affect liver cells cause the release of AST. The AST/ALT ratio (when both are elevated) is usually greater than 2 in patients with alcoholic hepatitis.

      An increase in AST levels may indicate:
      Acute hemolytic anemia
      Acute pancreatitis
      Acute renal failure
      Liver cirrhosis
      Heart attack
      Hepatitis
      Infectious mononucleosis
      Liver cancer
      Liver necrosis
      Multiple trauma
      Primary muscle disease
      Progressive muscular dystrophy
      Recent cardiac catheterization or angioplasty
      Recent convulsion
      Recent surgery
      Severe deep burn
      Skeletal muscle trauma

      SGPT; Serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase; Alanine transaminase. An ALT test measures the amount of the enzyme ALT in serum (the liquid part of the blood).This test is used to determine if a patient has liver damage. ALT is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of the amino acid alanine. ALT works in a number of tissues, but its highest concentrations is in the liver. Injury to the liver results in release of the enzyme into the blood.
      Greater-than-normal ALT levels may indicate:

      Celiac disease
      Cirrhosis
      Hepatitis (viral, autoimmune)
      Hereditary hemochromatosis
      Liver ischemia (blood flow deficiency to the liver)
      Liver tumor

      Use of drugs that are poisonous to the liver
      The test for HDL cholesterol is used along with other lipid tests to determine your risk of heart disease. High HDL is better than low HDL. It is usually reported as a measured value. If HDL is less than 40 mg/dL (1.04 mmol/L), there is an increased risk of heart disease. A desirable level of HDL is greater than 40 mg/dL (1.04 mmol/L) and is associated with average risk of heart disease. A good level of HDL is 60 mg/dL (1.55 mmol/L) or more and is associated with a less than average risk of heart disease. HDL cholesterol should be measured when a person is healthy. Cholesterol is temporarily low during acute illness.

      TSH is a laboratory test that measures the amount of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in your blood. TSH is produced by the pituitary gland and tells the thyroid gland to make and release the hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3).
      Normal values are from 0.4 to 4.0 mIU/L for those with no symptoms of abnormal thyroid function. However, those without signs or symptoms of an underactive thyroid who have a TSH value over 2.0 mIU/L but normal T4 levels may develop hypothyroidism sometime in the future. This is called subclinical hypothyroidism (mildly underactive thyroid) or early-stage hypothyroidism. Anyone with a TSH value above this level should be followed very closely by a doctor.
      If you are being treated for a thyroid disorder, your TSH level should be between 0.5 and 2.0 mIU/L.
      Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

  43. QUESTION:
    IMPORTANT: What's the best time to do this hormonal blood tests?
    Free Thyroxine (fT4)
    Free Triiodothyronine (fT3)
    Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)
    Estradiol (E2)
    Progesterone
    Testosterone
    Prolactin
    DHEA

    Should I do it while I'm on my period, before my period, after my period...which day/week of my cycle?

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      "If you suspect low thyroid function, but have had "normal" blood tests, you and your doctor may want to take a second look. A TSH of greater than 2.5 is not normal.

      Nine years ago, the American National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry narrowed the reference range for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) from 0.5-5.0 to 0.2-2.5mIU/L. Similar revisions by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) meant that 13 million people previously considered to be normal, could now become officially diagnosed with under-active thyroid. (1)

      You should also consider the fact that TSH is lower if the blood test is taken later in the day, and if you were not fasting. (2) Your TSH reading may be artificially low if you are deficient in cortisol, an adrenal hormone.

      Another very important test for thyroid is the blood test for thyroid antibodies. Thyroid antibodies can cause symptoms even when TSH is normal. In particular, they have been shown to have a role in fertility and miscarriage. (3,4)"

      Thyroid disease >>>
      http://www.sensible-alternative.com.au/metabolic-hormones/thyroid-article

      "If you are still cycling then it is very important that the test is done between days 19 to 23 of your cycle (luteal phase) assuming it is a 28 day cycle. If the test is done outside this range then the results obtained are of only limited use."

      "Saliva testing measures the free and therefore biologically active form of several of the major hormones in saliva – estriol, estradiol, estrone, progesterone, testosterone, DHEA and cortisol. Saliva tests have been proven to be an accurate reflection of hormone levels present inside cells, where the hormone action takes place, whereas blood tests measure hormones outside the cells. It is considered to be the gold standard for hormone analysis by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and even used by NASA."

      "The best time of the day to collect a sample for any baseline hormone analysis for diagnosis is in the early morning (except for 24 hour urine analysis) before breakfast, and the best time of the month for women is between days 19 to 23 of a 28 day menstral cycle (day one is first day of mensus). This is when progesterone levels are apt to be highest (luteal phase) during the entire cycle."

      Measuring Hormone Levels >>>
      http://www.custommedicine.com.au/hormone-analysis/

  44. QUESTION:
    How do I cure BO??
    I have had BO all my life and is desperately looking for a cure. I have tried all the best deodorants but nothing helps. Pls suggest me a really good deodorant/anti antiperspirant and tell me what to do so I can cure it.

    I have recently shaved my armpits but that does not help at all, in fact it makes it much worse. In fact, now I start stinking after 5 minutes of coming out of the shower.

    Can anybody help me please?

    • ANSWER:
      There is a prescription deodorant you can get. Also, you diet could affect this. I think it has more alcohol in it????

      Here are a couple of good links for you to check out:

      http://www.blacktable.com/wolinetz040114.htm

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sweating-and-body-odor/DS00305/DSECTION=6

      Excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis)
      Some people sweat more than others for no apparent reason. But some factors may make you sweat heavily. These include:

      * Heredity. Some people inherit a tendency to sweat excessively, especially on their palms and the soles of their feet.
      * Certain foods and beverages. Drinking hot beverages and those that contain caffeine or alcohol can make you sweat. Eating spicy foods can, too.
      * Certain drugs. Drugs that can cause excessive sweating include some antipsychotic medications used to treat mental disorders, morphine and excess doses of the thyroid hormone thyroxine. Analgesics, such as aspirin and acetaminophen (Tylenol), also increase sweating.
      * Low levels of male hormones. Men with low levels of the male hormone testosterone or a condition known as hypogonadism — caused by reduced functioning of the testicles — also can have hot flashes.
      * Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). This occurs when the level of sugar in your blood drops below a certain level. It's most common in people with diabetes who take insulin or oral medications that enhance the action of insulin. Early signs and symptoms include sweating, shakiness, weakness, hunger, dizziness and nausea. Some people may develop low blood sugar after eating, especially if they've had stomach or intestinal surgery. In rare cases, your body may produce too much of the pancreatic hormone insulin, leading to low blood sugar.
      * Fevers. Fever occurs when your temperature rises above its normal range. You may have a fever with many types of bacterial and viral infections. When your body temperature finally begins to return to normal, known as "breaking of the fever," you may sweat profusely, which is your body's way of dissipating the excess heat. Shaking chills after the fever are your body's attempt to raise its core temperature. Repeated episodes of fever followed by sweating and chills may indicate a serious infection or other illness.
      * Overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism). Sometimes the thyroid gland produces excess amounts of the hormone thyroxine. This can cause a number of signs and symptoms, including weight loss, a rapid or irregular heartbeat, nervousness and increased sensitivity to heat. It may also cause you to perspire much more than normal.
      * Tuberculosis. In 2002, this chronic bacterial infection of the lungs affected more than 15,000 people in the United States. When left untreated, tuberculosis can be fatal. Among its signs and symptoms are a cough, fever and night sweats.

  45. QUESTION:
    I want to START smoking cigarettes?
    Im 21 and i tried the other day a cigarette. It felt really good, i enjoy it really much. I will start smoking tomorrow but i will not smoke more than 3 cigarettes at day, that way i will always feel the relaxing buzz it gives. About those sidefects well i have seen many of people living long and great lifes and they smoke, including my father who is 86 and has smoked for 67 years, he is very happy and has never suffered nothing. I know about lots of people who died early and never smoked and even exercised daily, so to me is destiny and smoking is great, people are just hysterical. Anyone agrees with me?

    • ANSWER:
      Illness caused by smoking

      Smoking harms nearly every organ of the body, causing many diseases, and reduces quality of life and life expectancy. It has been estimated that, in England, 364,000 patients are admitted to NHS hospitals each year due to diseases caused by smoking. This translates into 7,000 hospital admissions per week, or 1,000 day. [1] For every death caused by smoking, approximately 20 smokers are suffering from a smoking related disease. [2] In 1997/98, cigarette smoking caused an estimated 480,000 patients to consult their GP for heart disease, 20,000 for stroke and nearly 600,000 for COPD. 1
      Half of all teenagers who are currently smoking will die from diseases caused by tobacco if they continue to smoke. One quarter will die after 70 years of age and one quarter before, with those dying before 70 losing on average 21 years of life. [3] It is estimated that between 1950 and 2000 six million Britons, 60 million people worldwide, died from tobacco-related diseases. [4]

      Non-lethal illness
      Smokers face a higher risk than non-smokers for a wide variety of illnesses, many of which may be fatal (see “Deaths caused by smoking” below). However, many medical conditions associated with smoking, while they may not be fatal, may cause years of debilitating illness or other problems. These include: [5]

      Increased risk for smokers

      1)Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (gum disease)
      2)Muscle injuries
      3)Angina (20 x risk)
      4)Neck pain
      5)Back pain
      6)Nystagmus (abnormal eye movements)
      7)Buerger’s Disease (severe circulatory disease)
      8)Ocular Histoplasmosis (fungal eye infection)
      9)Duodenal ulcer
      10)Osteoporosis (in both sexes)
      11)Cataract (2 x risk)
      12)Osteoarthritis
      13)Cataract, posterior subcapsular (3 x risk)
      14)Penis (Erectile dysfunction)
      15)Colon Polyps
      16)Peripheral vascular disease
      17)Crohn’s Disease (chronic inflamed bowel)
      18)Pneumonia
      19)Depression
      20)Psoriasis (2 x risk)
      21)Diabetes (Type 2, non-insulin dependent)
      22)Skin wrinkling (2 x risk)
      23)Hearing loss
      24)Stomach ulcer
      25)Influenza
      26)Rheumatoid arthritis (for heavy smokers)
      27)mpotence (2 x risk)
      28)Tendon injuries
      29)Optic Neuropathy (loss of vision, 16 x risk)
      30)Tobacco Amblyopia (loss of vision)
      31)Ligament injuries
      32)Tooth loss
      33)Macular degeneration (eyes, 2 x risk)
      34)Tuberculosis
      35)General functions impaired in smokers
      36)Ejaculation (volume reduced)
      37)Sperm count reduced
      38)Fertility (30% lower in women)
      39)Sperm motility impaired
      40)Immune System (impaired)
      41)Sperm less able to penetrate the ovum
      42)Menopause (onset 1.74 years early on average)
      43)Sperm shape abnormalities increased

      Symptoms worse in smokers
      1)Asthma
      2)Graves’ disease (over-active thyroid gland)
      3)Chronic rhinitis (chronic inflammation of the nose)
      4)Multiple Sclerosis
      5)Diabetic retinopathy (eyes)
      6)Optic Neuritis (eyes)

      Disease more severe or persistent in smokers
      1)Common cold
      2)Pneumonia
      3)Crohn’s Disease (chronic inflamed bowel)
      4)Tuberculosis
      5)Influenza

      Deaths caused by smoking

      One in two long-term smokers will die prematurely as a result of smoking – half of these in middle age. The most recent estimates show that around 114,000 people in the UK are killed by smoking every year, accounting for one fifth of all UK deaths. [7] Most die from one of the three main diseases associated with cigarette smoking: lung cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease (bronchitis and emphysema) and coronary heart disease. The table below shows the percentage and numbers of deaths attributable to smoking, based on the latest available detailed breakdown (2002 data).
      Deaths caused by smoking are five times higher than the 22,833 deaths arising from: traffic accidents (3,439); poisoning and overdose (881); alcoholic liver disease (5,121); other accidental deaths (8,579); murder and manslaughter (513); suicide (4,066); and HIV infection (234) in the UK during 2002. 8 World-wide, almost 5 million die prematurely each year as a result of smoking. Based on current trends, this will rise to 10 million within 20 years.

      Still Interested? If yes is your answer, Only God Can Save You!!!
      You are a matured young person and have the right to decide for youself.If the statistics above dont appeal to you, nothing would !
      Hope that good sense prevails.Remember, your father may be one of the lucky few.This need not be the case with you.
      Also remember,SMOKING MAY NOT NECESSARILY KILL YOU, BUT WILL YOU CRIPPLED HEALTHWISE AND DEPENDANT ON EVERYONE FOR THE REST OF YOUR LONG LIFE.
      All the best.

  46. QUESTION:
    Why do I have a slow metabolism, whilst the rest of my family don't?

    • ANSWER:
      To a certain extent, a person's basal metabolic rate (BMR) is inherited in other words passed on through the genes a person gets from his or her parents. Sometimes health problems can affect a person's BMR. But people can actually change their BMR in certain ways. For example, exercising more will not only cause a person to burn more calories directly from the extra activity itself, but becoming more physically fit will increase BMR as well. BMR is also influenced by body composition like people with more muscle and less fat generally have higher BMR's.

      * Things that can go wrong with Metabolism:

      In a broad sense, a metabolic disorder is any disease that is caused by an abnormal chemical reaction in the body's cells. Most disorders of metabolism involve either abnormal levels of enzymes or hormones or problems with the functioning of those enzymes or hormones. When the metabolism of body chemicals is blocked or defective, it can cause a buildup of toxic substances in the body or a deficiency of substances needed for normal body function, either of which can lead to serious symptoms.

      Some metabolic diseases are inherited. These conditions are called inborn errors of metabolism. When babies are born, they're tested for many of these metabolic diseases in a newborn screening test. Many of these inborn errors of metabolism can lead to serious complications or even death if they're not controlled with diet or medication from an early age.

      Examples of metabolic disoders and conditions include:

      * G6PD deficiency. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, or G6PD, is just one of the many enzymes that play a role in cell metabolism. G6PD is produced by red blood cells and helps the body metabolize carbohydrates. Without enough normal G6PD to help red blood cells handle certain harmful substances, red blood cells can be damaged or destroyed, leading to a condition known as hemolytic anemia. In a process called hemolysis (pronounced: hih-mah-luh-sus), red blood cells are destroyed prematurely, and the bone marrow (the soft, spongy part of the bone that produces new blood cells) may not be able to keep up with the body's need to produce more new red blood cells. Kids with G6PD deficiency may be pale and tired and have a rapid heartbeat and breathing. They may also have an enlarged spleen or jaundice - a yellowing of the skin and eyes. G6PD deficiency is usually treated by discontinuing medications or treating the illness or infection causing the stress on the red blood cells.

      * Galactosemia: Babies born with this inborn error of metabolism do not have enough of the enzyme that breaks down the sugar in milk called galactose. This enzyme is produced in the liver. If the liver doesn't produce enough of this enzyme, galactose builds up in the blood and can cause serious health problems. Symptoms usually occur within the first days of life and include vomiting, swollen liver, and jaundice. If galactosemia is not diagnosed and treated quickly, it can cause liver, eye, kidney, and brain damage.

      * Hyperthyroidism: Hyperthyroidism is caused by an overactive thyroid gland. The thyroid releases too much of the hormone thyroxine, which increases the person's basal metabolic rate (BMR). It causes symptoms such as weight loss, increased heart rate and blood pressure, protruding eyes, and a swelling in the neck from an enlarged thyroid (goiter). The disease may be controlled with medications or through surgery or radiation treatments.

      * Hypothyroidism: Hypothyroidism is caused by an absent or underactive thyroid gland and it results from a developmental problem or a destructive disease of the thyroid. The thyroid releases too little of the hormone thyroxine, so a person's basal metabolic rate (BMR) is low. In infants and young children who don't get treatment, this condition can result in stunted growth and mental retardation. Hypothyroidism slows body processes and causes fatigue, slow heart rate, excessive weight gain, and constipation. Kids and teens with this condition can be treated with oral thyroid hormone to achieve normal levels in the body.

      * Phenylketonuria: Also known as PKU, this condition occurs in infants due to a defect in the enzyme that breaks down the amino acid phenylalanine. This amino acid is necessary for normal growth in infants and children and for normal protein production. However, if too much of it builds up in the body, brain tissue is affected and mental retardation occurs. Early diagnosis and dietary restriction of the amino acid can prevent or lessen the severity of these complications.

      * Type 1 diabetes mellitus: Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas doesn't produce and secrete enough insulin. Symptoms of this disease include excessive thirst and urination, hunger, and weight loss. Over the long term, the disease can cause kidney problems, pain due to nerve damage, blindness, and heart and blood vessel disease. Kids and teens with type 1 diabetes need to receive regular injections of insulin and control blood sugar levels to reduce the risk of developing problems from diabetes.

      * Type 2 diabetes: Type 2 diabetes happens when the body can't respond normally to insulin. The symptoms of this disorder are similar to those of type 1 diabetes. Many children and teens who develop type 2 diabetes are overweight, and this is thought to play a role in their decreased responsiveness to insulin. Some kids and teens can be treated successfully with dietary changes, exercise, and oral medication, but insulin injections are necessary in other cases. Controlling blood sugar levels reduces the risk of developing the same kinds of long-term health problems that occur with type 1 diabetes.

      I recommend that you consult any concern with regards to this with your doctor for further evaluation.

      Good luck :)

  47. QUESTION:
    My TSH is 0.01 whereas my Free T3 and FreeT4 are normal. I feel horrible. I'm told that I am ok. Now what?
    I exibit 90% of the symptoms of Graves Disease but my endocrinologist tells me that I am ok. If this is considered "ok" then why do i feel so horrible? I wish someone could help me. My thyroid US indicates that my thyroid is enlarged and that I have several nodules that are solid and cystic. It was suggested by the radiologist that the nodules be biopsied. I have not had any response from my endocrinologist. I need to start feeling better. I can barely function at all.

    • ANSWER:
      It is NOT okay.
      If TSH is 0.01, you would be expected to be having major symptoms, despite free T3 and free T4 that are normal.

      I was already seeing an endocrinologist for a different endocrine disease (all told, I have four endocrine diseases) when I developed low TSH. My TSH never dropped below 0.12 on our testing, and my T3 and T4 stayed normal. Nonetheless, I lost 22 pounds- from 119 to 97 lb- developed a full body tremor, my resting pulse rose by 20 bpm, I developed panic attacks, my hair thinned out.

      TSH that is less than 0.3 is a strong sign of one of the diseases causing thyrotoxicity. You are considered to have "subclinical" thyrotoxicity if the T3 and T4 are normal, but it is still usually indicative of thyroid disease.
      About 70% of cases of low TSH are from Grave's disease. It is more likely to be Grave's disease if the TSH is very low (the lower, the more likely, with 0.01 being more likely Grave's than not) but there are a number of other possible causes.

      When my TSH was that low, the next thing (after T3 and T4) to get tested was my thyroid antibody levels. I had had them tested and they were negative a few years earlier; they were negative still. In Grave's and Hashimoto's disease, usually at least one of the thyroid antibodies will be possitive, however, antibody positivity does not absolutely distinguish between them.
      The next step (which would have been the next step even if my antibodies had been positive) was a radioactive iodine test. A radioactive iodine test can diagnose Grave's disease with full certainty (and it can rule it out too). My radioactive iodine test showed that I had subacute thyroiditis, and not Grave's disease. Since subacute thyroiditis is self limiting, the treatment is just for the symptoms (like beta blockers to protect the heart) and the thyroid disease either fixes itself or eventually turns into hypothyroidism. Even though I did get better, it took many months after the TSH normalized (and it was abnormal for many months) for me to feel better.

      Thyrotoxic nodular disease is responsible for about 10% of cases of hyperthyroidism. It doesn't fix itself, and it does need treatment. You should probably see another endocrinologist.

      A TSH of 0.01 is never okay.

  48. QUESTION:
    Thyroid blood test: Normal TSH,and normal T 4, slightly lower Free T3, anyone?
    my doctor ordered a routine blood test for thyroid.
    I do not have any problem history or symptom, he told me this is a routine test.

    The TSH was very normal,Also the T 4 while the Free T3 was slightly below the reference values. It should be between 2.8 to 7.1 and it was 1.81
    i have appointment tomorrow to see doc,
    Anyone knows why i had a lower free T3?
    Any similar experiences?

    • ANSWER:
      What was your TSH? The Americian National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry issued new guidelines in 2003 for TSH levels to be between 0.3 - 2.5mU/L although newer research shows levels above 2.0mU/L is likely to be in the early stages of hypothyroidism. Free T3 needs to be towards the top of the reference range for healthy thyroid function.

      Lab results:
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/lab-values/

      How to interpret thyroid lab results:
      http://www.labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/tsh/test.html

  49. QUESTION:
    2ª) What is the treatment for this?
    The first question and some notes (question answered):

    1ª) What is the name of the disease that a person feels strong fumigations all over your body?
    Several doctors have looked all over my friend did not identify the disease yet.
    My friend drank radioactive iodine for his hyperthyroidism, causing hypothyroidism.
    He take a hormone (T3 and T4) every day for his own good.
    My friend feel very uncomfortable, and constant pain in the skin, a doctor has a remedy, which is amato, relieving a little the fumigations.
    Stress and heat (like the sun) intensifies the fumigations even with the amato in the blood.
    He also takes 2mg of rivotril (clonazepam) for day. (because of his heart that without it his heart acelerate.)
    My friend calls the fumigation of (perfuration of hot needles all over the skin).
    My friend lives with me at work and the disease is not contagious.
    There is no stain or redness on his skin. Noting that there is no muscle pain.
    Only pain in the skin.(only skin pain).
    I'll appreciate and I will be grateful to the person who know the name of the disease.

    RESPOSTA;

    Soya, the tingling (fumigations) may be due to the hypothyroidism which the treatment has caused, something which physicians are aware of when they treat hyperthyroidism. Perhaps there are other symptoms of low thyroid function. Without enough thyroid hormone, the body becomes tired and run down. Every organ system slows—the brain slows down making it difficult to concentrate, the gut slows down causing constipation, and metabolism slows down causing weight gain. Aggressive treatment of hyperthyroidism may cause an underactive thyroid gland, the resulting effect on the body is the same.

    Many of the symptoms of hypothyroidism are very subtle. A lot of physicians overlook the symptoms of fatigue, weight gain and depression and attribute them to other causes. Physicians should check to see if thyroid disease is the cause of these everyday symptoms. Patients who are treated for hypothyroidism can regain full control of their lives and eliminate these symptoms entirely.
    Another common cause of hypothyroidism is the use of radioactive iodine. This destruction sometimes results in hypothyroidism. This type of hypothyroidism may be difficult to detect immediately, because there may be just a small amount of thyroid tissue that is not destroyed right away. This small piece of thyroid may produce enough thyroid hormone for the body for a little while. However, if this piece of thyroid burns out or gives up, hypothyroidism may result.

    Because this hypothyroidism can occur anywhere from months to years after treatment with radioactive iodine, you may not immediately recognize the subtle symptoms of fatigue, weight gain and difficulty concentrating. Your friend should visit the doctors regularly and have routine thyroid function blood tests. By checking these blood tests once a year, hypothyroidism may be discovered in its earliest stages before symptoms like fatigue and weight gain.
    Secondary Hypothyroidism
    The symptoms of hypothyroidism are mainly dependent on the amount of decrease in thyroid hormone and duration of time that the decrease has been present. For most patients, the symptoms are mild and can often be confused with other problems.
    Fonte(s):
    a medical professional

    2ª) The second question is: What is the treatment for this?
    My friend still suffering and taking drugs to not feel pain. I feel sad about him.
    This pain who he feels isn't normal. The pain is strong, he said.
    He is taking a new drug: Floral ( from plants: it's a detoxifier and a normalizing body )
    But I think isn't a toxin, because it's been months that he takes, and won't get better.
    I think it's a psychological illnesses.

    • ANSWER:
      The PURPOSE of the use of the radioactive iodine is to make one who is HypERthyroid (overactive/low TSH level), become HypO (underactive/hi TSH level) THEN one is commonly treated w/ Synthroid to bring the person up to the right level thus bringing the TSH level down hopefully to within the 'normal' range of .3 - 3 (w/ most feeling best @ < 2). It may take several months to get the dose regulated ...even then, A LOT of people still DO NOT experience much relief...sorry.

      God bless

  50. QUESTION:
    i hve hypothyroid for te past 2 yrs.next yr am gettin married.is there any chance of my baby getting te same?
    problem or ll it suffer from any other defects??

    • ANSWER:
      There is link between mothers with hypothyroidism during pregnancy and developmental delay in their children after birth.

      The management of each woman's situation is considered individually after consultation with her physician.

      There is a relationship between thyroid levels in the mother and brain development of her child.
      study demonstrates that uncontrolled hypothyroidism in pregnant women can have long-term effects on the children of these mothers. Also, the effects occur even if the hypothyroidism is mild and the woman does not exhibit any symptoms. However, the more significant the hypothyroidism, the greater the likelihood of developmental problems.

      Before birth a baby is entirely dependent on the mother for thyroid hormone until the baby's own thyroid gland can start to function. This usually does not occur until about 12 weeks of gestation (the end of the first trimester of pregnancy). Thus, hypothyroidism of the mother may play a role early on, before many women realize they are pregnant! In fact, the babies of mothers who were hypothyroid in the first part of pregnancy, then adequately treated, exhibited slower motor development than the babies of normal mothers. However, during the later part of pregnancy, hypothyroidism in the mother can also have adverse effects on the baby, as pointed out by the research described above. These children are more likely to have intellectual impairment.

      In women with hypothyroidism before conception, most go back to their pre-pregnancy dose of thyroid hormone within a few weeks to months.
      A pregnant woman with hypothyroidism is at higher risk for miscarriage,babies with low birth weight, or stillbirths
      Women with untreated hypothyroidism near the time of delivery are in danger of developing high blood pressure and premature delivery.
      Babies born to women with untreated hypothyroidism may not achieve their full intellectual potential.
      Every woman treated with thyroid hormone who anticipates becoming pregnant or is found to be pregnant should have her thyroid hormone levels monitored more closely.a pregnant woman with hypothyroidism should have her thyroid function checked during each trimester.

early symptoms of low thyroid function