Causes Of Low Tsh In Hypothyroidism

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Will a blood test of TSH levels show problems with the parathyroid gland?
    I'm scheduled to undergo a blood test to check the level of TSH, and only TSH. I've been having just about all the trademarks of an under active thyroid.
    More recently however, I've also been having symptoms similar to hypoparathyroidism- the twitches, spasms, and tingling sensations.

    I'm not sure if or how the thyroid and parathyroid glands interact, but I would have to imagine that they do in some manner. Can an abnormal (high or low) level of TSH cause changes in the function of the parathyroid gland, or vice versa? If there is an abnormality with the thyroid or parathyroid gland, will a blood test for TSH levels reflect that?

    • ANSWER:
      Hypoparathyroidism that isn't caused by a mistake during surgery on the thyroid or parathyroid is extremely rare, and symptoms are usually much more severe than that. I'd guess almost anything else first.

      Hyperparathyroidism is common. To test for either one, you'd test PTH levels- parathyroid hormone levels. The only reason anybody would test PTH is that they'd first test calcium. Calcium is tested all the time. I would not be surprised if they are testing your calcium just 'cause they always do. Low calcium would definitely be present if you in fact had hypoparathyroidism.
      Hypothyroidism is common- hundreds of times more common than hypoparathyroidism.

      The TSH will not tell you anything about parathyroid function.

      The parathyroid glands are next to the thyroid glands, but it's rare for something to affect them both. The biggest link between them is that when somebody is operating on one they sometimes damage the other.

      I have had both PTH and TSH run.

      The thyroid gland has one function that does a lot of things- it makes thyroid hormone, which drives your entire metabolism, and affects everything. Thyroid disease is common, and often is mild. It can cause a large variety of symptoms, including your twitches and tingling.

      Your parathyroid glands (there are four of them) sit on top of the thyroid, and they have exactly one job- they make parathyroid hormone and that controls the calcium levels in your blood. Not rarely, one of the parathyoid glands starts making more hormone than it should, driving calcium levels up. Since having even one parathyroid gland that works is enough to keep your calcium levels normal (and you asymptomatic), accidental damage to one or more parathyroid glands during the removal of an overact parathyroid gland or of the thyroid is the most common cause of hypoparathyroidism.

  2. QUESTION:
    If a person suffers from genetic hypothyroidism,will he always suffer from goitre due to thyroxine deficiency?
    i heard that genetic hypothyroidism causes low level of thyroxine secrition . on the other hand if a persome suffers from iodine deficiency , he will suffer from goitre due to some malfunction in thyroxine secretion as iodine helps in the synthesis of thyroxine . A person suffering from hypothyroidism will by default have low thyroxine secretion , so will he permanently suffer from goitre ?

    • ANSWER:
      Not everyone with hypothyroidism will suffer from a goiter. Goiters can be helped by Levothyroxine which will normalize the TSH.

  3. QUESTION:
    Is hypothyroidism related to Cushings Disease in dogs?
    My dog was diagnosed with low thyroid. Then we discovered that he has Cushings disease from the steroids used to treat his allergies. He has been off steroids for over 2 months now and is doing very well. Should I have his thyroid rechecked (0 test) or are these things unrelated?

    • ANSWER:
      You definitely ought to have his thyroid function reassessed- if he is truly hypothyroid, he will need to be given synthetic thyroxine (thyroid hormone) for life.

      It is a possibility, as Vet Tech said, that the low thyroid function was due to his Cushings- almost any illness can create a condition called Sick Euthyroid Syndrome, which basically means that although the thyroid gland is prefectly normal, less thyroid hormone is being produced as a direct effect of the illness.

      As his Cushings was caused by the steroids, rather than by his body producing too much cortisol, the Cushings should resolve over time. You've said that he's doing very well, which I'm taking to mean that the Cushings signs are resolving as expected.

      The important thing when you do have him re-tested is to make sure that it is done as a FREE T4 (FT4) test. This is really the only practical and accurate test to diagnose hypothyroidism.

      A Total T4 (TT4) test will detect low thyroid hormone, but cannot differentiate between sick euthyroid and true hypothyroidism.

      A TSH test is not overly useful either, and I wouldn't waste your money on it- while it should be higher than normal, up to 40% of hypoT dogs have normal levels, and up to 20% of normal dogs have elevated levels.

      I hope that makes sense. Please feel free to email me if anything I've said is unclear.

  4. QUESTION:
    How long does it take to get blood test results?
    I got thyroid, low blood sugar, cholesterol panel, andcomplete blood count. I got it done at a lab and it has to be sent out than back to my drs office. How long does it normally take?

    • ANSWER:
      Different for different tests.

      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (...OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

      You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. [anti-TPO and TgAb] They can code so that ins will pay.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

      God bless you

  5. QUESTION:
    Why is hypothyroidism more common in women than men?
    I know what hypothyroidism is, but what causes more women to have hypothyroidism than men? If a male has hypothyroidism what would be some causes to that? In general, what are some underlying causes of hypothyroidism? My dad told me he went to the doctors and has hypothyroidism and has to go back to find out the causes. I don't know if their is a family history of hypothyroidism or other auto-immune diseases.

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroid activity fluctuates within the day in response to diet, stress, temperature, etc. In light of this knowledge, one can speculate or identify genetic, hormonal, lifestyle, & dietary factors as contributors to hypothyroidism.

      Since hypothyroidism often besets someone gradually, it is one of the degenerative diseases that gets noticed as lifespans increase.As you mentioned, autoimmune diseases can target the thyroid & cause dysfunction, either by elevating thyroid activity or decreasing it (sometimes it increases it first & then decreases it later). It's hard to isolate this as genetic or hormonal, since women do tend to have more autoimmune disorders. Perhaps it's both. Estradiol (an estrogen) can have an antagonistic effect on thyroid function by competing for binding sites. If estradiol binds first, then thyroxine/tetraiodothyronine (T4) & triidothyronine (T3) cannot exert their effects. Estradiol also limits other thermogenic (calorie burning) & potentially thyroid stimulating effects due to its functions in limiting muscular development & encouraging fat storage. Furthermore, estradiol does not limit the activity of the adrenal glands the way that testosterone does. The "fatigue" of the adrenal glands (not as pronounced or fatal as Addison's Disease) due to insufficient curbing of their activity can decrease thyroid function. Lifestyle factors such as lack of stress reduction accelerate this process. Finally, women tend to consume less calories than men; more specifically, they eat less fat & protein. Whereas adequate fat consumption is essential for the production of certain hormones (cortisol, aldosterone, progesterone, estradiol, testosterone, etc.), adequate protein consumption is essential for peptide hormones like thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormones consist of the amino acid tyrosine combined with 1, 2, 3, or 4 atoms of iodine (hence, they have names such as tri - iodo - thyronine). In the hope of losing weight or keeping weight down, many women deprive themselves of the building blocks for healthy amounts of hormones. Some foods & supplements are goitrogenic (goiter inducing/reduce thyroid activity), such as soy. Sometimes, the cause is idiopathic (of unknown origin).

      Men with hypothyroidism may have similar causes, such as an insufficient diet, excessive stress, etc. Low testosterone may correlate with low thyroid hormones, but it's hard to say which causes which, as there are thyroid receptors in the testes, yet testosterone may increase or decrease thyroid hormone production (without necessarily causing hypothyroid symptoms). Likewise, men may have idiopathic hypothyroidism.

      Most of the factors listed above still fall within two basic categories: primary (the organ itself) hypothyroidism or secondary (the organ[s] that instruct it to act) hypothyroidism. Both men & women may have hypothyroidism as a result of inadequate TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) from the pituitary gland or failure of the thyroid to respond properly to TSH.

      Sorry to make your eyes bleed from this lengthy response. As a final consideration, make sure your dad's doctor tests for thyroid function thoroughly via blood tests. TSH standards for hypothyroidism have been drastically revised (from 5.0 or greater to 3.0 or greater), & TSH itself is insufficient to identify true hypothyroidism without accounting for symptoms. The pituitary often mismeasures need for thyroid stimulating hormone. T4, T3, free T4, free T3, & reverse T3 are vital for determining true thyroid function. The source listed below contains information from patients contending with hypothyroidism who seek the best, most up-to-date medical advice concerning their disease. I wish you & your father well, as this can be very difficult to treat without a good doctor *who listens*.

  6. QUESTION:
    how can you know if hypothyroidism is caused by iodine deficiency?
    oddly enough my cholestrahol (sp?) level is very low....
    i have a raised tsh level of around 7 and my T4 is normal. i have to admit that i've never had the most well rounded diet and tend to eat fast food alot and alot of hamburgers, fries. i've never liked salads or vegetables much and i don't like to add salt to anything. so wiht that info can you tell me if i could have an iodine deficiency that is causing my hypothyroidism?
    ok it's my T4 free that is 1.1 i don't know...i'm not used to these titles yet... so does that make a difference?

    • ANSWER:
      I doubt it. Actually, according to your information, it sounds like you have subclinical hypothyroidism, due to the fact that your T4 is normal. You have to understand what the numbers mean -- TSH is thyroid stimulating hormone. With a high TSH, your body has to produce a lot more hormone to keep your thyroid normal than it used to. Well, it is doing the trick -- with normal T4 (and presumably T3 and free T levels), the amount of TSH your body is kicking out is keeping your thyroid acting normally. Therefore, it leads me to suspect you have very early Hashimoto's Disease, which is an autoimmune disease in which antibodies attack the thyroid and kill it. (They don't know where these antibodies come from and are looking for the source.) So, that said, you will have a future of raising your supplemental thyroid hormone as the antibodies continue to attack the thyroid.

      Indicentally, with hypothyroidism, if your thyroid level is too low, your cholesterol level jumps. For your cholesterol level to be so low, you don't have a bad case of hypothyroidism ...

      Don't look for the cause to be iodine deficiency ... it very likely is not and more likely is autoimmune.

      It's not as bad as it may seem -- I have it and have had it for over 10 years. My levels will change and I just adjust my dosage of levothyroxine (the replacement thyroid hormone) -- no issues and the hormone itself is very cheap. Take care of yourself!

  7. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of lower belly fat?
    Out of nowhere my stomach started to bloat quicker and now it looks like a little pooch is forming under my belly button. What causes this? I've always been skinny but now my lower stomach isn't as flat.. What happened? I've been running 2-4 miles everyday and I've tried Pilates on and off a few times.. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      IBS, weight gain and many more conditions can all come from hypothyroidism.
      You should see your doctor and ask for the following blood tests: TSH, FT4, FT3 and most importantly anti-thyroid antibodies.
      Only they can reveal if you have a problem with your thyroid, like Hashimoto's thyroiditis.
      Normal TSH is 0.3-3. (Some doctors still use the out-dated reference range of 0.5-5.5)
      Some doctors are very misinformed and not knowledgeable about thyroid conditions.
      See the symptoms below:
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hypothyroidism/ds00353/dsection=symptoms
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hashimotos-disease/DS00567/DSECTION=symptoms
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com

      Treatment includes thyroid hormone replacement, such as Synthroid or natural Armour.

      This can also be caused by the liver, so try to eat healthy food: fruits, vegetables, nuts, drink 2 liters of water. Avoid hydrogenated and trans fats and sugars.

  8. QUESTION:
    Doctor says wait 6 months to determine if I am low thyroid?
    I had some bloodwork done for thyroid because I have had worsning anxiety. Results said low thyroid. So doc told me get more bloodwork in 6 months and then if its low we will treat it. I went home and googled symptoms and I have several of them for sure. I have had these symptoms for a long time and it is ruining my life. Thought it was all related to depression. Can I go back in and tell him my syptoms? He never asked me if I had any. Do u really have to wait 6 months because I have to go back to work and I don't have that kind of time!

    • ANSWER:
      NO! You need a new doctor! (Not uncommon w/ thyroid issues).

      Thyroid disease is missed more than found. Three reasons: 1) not checking for antibodies; 2) going by wrong TSH 'normal' range; and, 3) not listening to symptoms.

      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2, like maybe ONE) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (...OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning [different antibodies]).

      You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. [anti-TPO and TgAb for Hashi’s] They can code so that ins will pay.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless you

  9. QUESTION:
    How important is to take thyroid prescription?
    I have hypothyroidism. The doctor has prescribed a generic version of synthroid and armour and both have given me adverse reactions. Some of the symptoms are increased blood pressure with shortness of breath, irritability, dry skin, and depression. Without taking the prescribed medicine I feel fine with no symptoms. Is there an alternative way to treat my low thyroid.
    So your telling me the wrong dose is creating what my outcome will be? Basically speeding up the process.

    • ANSWER:
      @formerly_bob --- well put!

      You need a different doctor ... one that will do a gradual increase in your dose while rechecking your levels every 6 wks. Also, I am wondering if you were tested for antibodies to see if your HypOthyroidism is caused by Hashimoto's Autoimmune Thyroiditis?

      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (...OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

      You should ask the doctor to add Cytomel. You should also take Selenium, Folic Acid, D3, Zinc, and B Complex. Are you taking your meds right? Taking 1st thing, on empty stomach, & do not eat (or coffee) for 1/2 hr? Also, if you take calcium, iron or acid reducer, do not take for 3 hrs.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

      God bless you

  10. QUESTION:
    Does hair grow back after it falls out from hypothyroidism?
    I have hypothyroidism and i've lost almost all of my hair, it's devastating, it upset me so much. Apparently my thyroid hormone levels are normal now and my tablets should be working but they aren't. I'm taking evening primrose oil, bioton, and i've just using certain shampoos, nothing is working, and i've had no new hair growth :(

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, hair can grow back after loss due to hypothyroidism. "Low thyroid function is one of the most common causes of diffuse hair loss. Problem is, most doctors are "strictly by the numbers" these days in terms of diagnosis. For example a TSH "normal" range could be .5-5.5. Therefore, anything between these numbers the doc dismisses as normal. This is wrong!

      There has been a recent change in thinking that even a TSH of 2 (well within "normal" range) when accompanied by hypothyroid symptoms is suspect. A course of thyroid hormone (starting at tiny dose) will not harm a normally functioning thyroid, and can only help a borderline or less obvious case of hypo." - Ann Smith

      I also blog about health issues and you can view that blog here:

      http://connectwithwellness.wordpress.com

  11. QUESTION:
    Is it okay if I dont take my thyroid meds for a while?
    I am on 25 mcg of Synthroid (low dose) but I am going to run out and wont be able to get more for maybe a month or so. I can't get in to see a doctor until then, maybe longer. Will anything happen if I don't take it?

    • ANSWER:
      Ditto on what Pharm wrote AND the doctor will know that you will need them since he/she cannot give you an appt before then & so will call it in to the pharmacy for you.

      Here is some info for you & great links:
      TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (...OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

      God bless you

  12. QUESTION:
    What is the relation between amount of iodine in the diet and thyroidism?
    How hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism can occur, and what is the relation of them with the iodine content?
    If TSH level is high, then are thyroid hormones released in excess (hyperthyroidism) or released in less amount (hypothyroidism) ??
    mam, i just love your answers. You always give so detailed and nice answers.

    • ANSWER:
      If there is an elevated TSH level in the blood, it can mean different things. If it is a problem with the pituitary gland and not the thyroid, then yes..the person will be hyperthyroid because the thyroid is being over-stimulated.
      However, sometimes TSH levels rise because the thyroid is not responding. There is a genetic disorder called Hashimoto's disease which is an autoimmune problem in the thyroid. The large protein thyroglobulin, which is needed for synthesis of T3 and T4 hormones, is never supposed to leave the thyroid gland. With Hashimoto's disease, the thyroid becomes permeable and allows some thyroglobulin out into the blood stream. Since this is not supposed to happen, the body's immune system regards the protein as foreign and produces antibodies which attack the source, the thyroid gland. This results in hypothyroidism, and the lower the plasma T3 and T4 hormones become, the more TSH is produced by the pituitary in an attempt to stimulate the thyroid.
      It is easily remedied with a tablet of synthetic thyroid hormone taken once a day, but the elevated TSH levels in this case are due to an underperforming thyroid.
      Iodine is necessary in forming T3 and T4, and if there is not enough iodine in the diet, the thyroid will again not be able to put out enough hormone so the pituitary will send out more TSH to try to stimulate it.
      In both Hashimoto's disease and low iodine levels, the thyroid swells up due to the excess stimulation of TSH which it cannot respond to. If the swelling becomes large enough, this is called a goiter.
      In hyperthyoidism, which can be caused by a number of things, TSH level may be elevated if the pituitary is the source of the problem, but TSH levels will decrease if the thyroid has gone into overproduction of hormones on its own. There are a number of ways this can happen, including a 'thyroid storm' after childbirth in some women. This too can be managed with medication if the cause is not a tumor on the pituitary or the thyroid gland. In that case, surgery might be the option, but again, it depends on the diagnosis and location of the tumor.

  13. QUESTION:
    how would hypothyroidism during pegnancy affect the baby?
    i am 10 wk pregnanat and my dr told me that I have hypothyroidism and my TSH level is 17. Please tell me would that in any way affect my baby? i read that it could lead to low IQ babies and my baby has already been in low levels of the hormone for 10wks.

    • ANSWER:
      If you have hypothyroidism then you will be prescribed thyroxine which will reduce your TSH level and make your body's thyroxine levels the same as any other person without a thyroid problem.

      I would assume you have already been given a prescription of thyroxine to take?

      I have had hypothyroidism for over 10 years and my TSH has been closely monitored in pregnancy as it can cause miscarriage.

      It CAN cause low IQ problems rarely, but I wouldn't be too concerned as your thyroid problem has been caught in the early stages and can be treated easily. Just make sure you are routinely checked througout your pregnancy like I was (blood tests every 4 weeks - max) and you will be fine.

  14. QUESTION:
    Is hypothyrodism one of the causes for low back pain to women at L5-S1?
    MRI & thyroid tests indicate that diffuse disc bulging and TSH high level respectively to a women of age:41Yrs. & weight: 70Kgs.

    • ANSWER:
      No, these are likely two separate medical issues. There is no known causal effect between them. There are many people with both these problems because they are common medical issues, but that doesn't mean that one of them caused the other one. Hypothyroidism is normally caused by a chemical imbalance in the hormones, and back pain due to disc bulging is a mechanical issue in the lumbar spine.

  15. QUESTION:
    How long does it take for hair to thicken/to see physical change after starting treatment for hyopothyroidism?
    Hey guys. I've heard that hypothyroidism has thinning of the hair as a symptom, something that I've got pretty iffy in the front! I've also heard that levothyroxine, when switching doses, it causes hair loss. Over the past three years, I've been diagnosed, but I had been taking levothyroxine not every single day (Sometimes it was every other day, sometimes once a month, sometimes for a week, sometimes two weeks, etc etc). Well, as of this August, I had FINALLY learned what Hypothyroidism is, and have learned that it is causing the majority of my problems, including the hair and my joint aches!

    So, my question again, how long would it take to see my hair thicken back up after seriously taking Levothyroxine (50 mcg) every day since around August 20th of 2012. It's December 26th 2012 as of today. So around four months have already passed. To be more in-general, because my joints still hurt a bit, how long will it take to see ANY physical changes in my body, after starting to take levo?

    My TSH level, last checked, was 1.37 if that helps any.

    Thank you all and happy holidays! :D

    • ANSWER:
      It may not thicken back ... may just stop thinning.

      I won't chastise for not taking the meds as you are already suffering the consequences. I have always felt that anyone who has had symptoms as severe & numerous as mine, would NEVER miss a dose.

      The meds are very slow-acting (takes 6 wks to see any change) . That 50mcg is a low dose. Your doctor should be re-checking every 6 wks for a few mos til you get to your optimum dose (then every 6 mos thereafter). If he/she will not do this, perhaps you need another doctor.

      God bless

  16. QUESTION:
    Does the amaount of water you drink with Synthroid matter when you take it?
    I was wondering: if you had hypothyroidism and had to take synthroid to treat it, why is it recommended to take one whole cup of water with it? Should you also make sure to get alot of water during the day? does synthroid have any affect on your kidneys?

    • ANSWER:
      I just wanted to reassure you synthroid is NOT toxic to the kidneys (or liver for that matter). I'm not sure where people are coming up with that info, but I'm an endocrine fellow and can assure you that it does not cause kidney or liver disease. It has no clinically significant medical effect on the kidneys (other than when hypothyroidism rarely can can low sodium via the kidneys and synthroid would help to correct it). There is no need to monitor kidney or liver tests just by virtue of being on synthroid. Main thing to watch out for is over-replacement (as monitored by checking your TSH every 6 weeks if it's not within range) with the main effects of over-replacement being on your heart (in the form of arrythmias) and your bone (i.e. osteoperosis). But as long as your TSH is in range, you should be fine.

  17. QUESTION:
    Please explain to me the results of my Thyroid Panel with TSH?
    Could I have Hypothyroidism with these results?
    TSH - 2.225
    Thyroxine (T4) 7.1
    T3 Uptake - 26%
    Free Thyroxine Index 1.8

    My mom, aunt and grandmother all have a thyroid problem. I have symptoms - espcially low concentration & weight gain - impossible to lose even when eating right & exercise.

    • ANSWER:
      I work in a hospital lab, and your numbers are all normal, in fact they are perfect. I am sorry if that's not what you wanted to hear :( It is not the answer to your current symptoms. You might have something else going on that is causing the weight gain and lack of concentration. Other things could explain those symptoms...have you ever been tested for polycystic ovary syndrome or had cortisol testing?

      Because your mom and grandma have thyroid problems, it is something you might have a problem with in the future especially when you hit menopause age. But for now, your numbers are great! Your thyroid is functioning properly. Hope that helps. Anymore questions, feel free to email me.

      Edit-DNA, where did you get your range for TSH from? Our range is 0.500-4.68 being normal. Of course, maybe the ranges you know are from are from a different insrument. Let me know if you can. Thanks so much!

  18. QUESTION:
    I have hypothyroidism and i don't take my medicine correctly. Can it make you lose your sex drive completely?
    I use to have a huge sex drive even when i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism, but maybe it's gotten more out of whack i don't know. It's hard for me to even make out with my husband anymore and that makes me so upset. Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      You are NOT alone my dear. Low fat, Low salt diets are a major contributor to this problem. A low thyroid is an indication of an endocrine problem and taking that medication is giving you "MAKE BELIEVE HEALTH" that is damaging your body, while not addressing the "root cause" of your thyroid problem is very likely causing endocrine problems as well.

      Have you ever known ANYONE to be deficient in drugs? Your doctor that prescribed the medication most likely took a blood test and saw that your TSH hormone was a little high, so he prescribed that junk for you and took the easy way out and left you with the booby prize.

      Don't you think if your doctor knew what he was doing and was really concerned about your health he would find out what was causing the thyroid output to be low? Instead, he treated the symptom and whatever caused the thyroid to not be able to produce T3 and T4 hormones is still there. Your endocrine is a system of complex relationships much like a spider web where if you touch one part of the web, the whole web shakes. Your thyroid, adrenal glands, ovaries, liver, etc. are all part of that endocrine system.

      What typically happens with low libido in Americans especially, is that you get on a low fat diet, low salt and then abuse your adrenal glands with high carbs, sugars, and cause lots of cortisol to be produced. The precursor hormone, pregnenalone is limited in supply and is produced in the adrenal glands. This hormone is required to produce steroid hormones in the liver; sex hormones. When the body requires lots of cortisol, you get what is called the "pregnenalone steal" where the limited supply is used to produce cortisol, leaving the body deficient and NO steroid hormones get produced. Our genetics have only changed about 0.1% in the last 12,000 years, so our bodies are still operating like primitive people's did. When a sabor tooth tiger is chasing you through the village, you need that cortisol to power up those muscles and give you quick instant energy. That's what our adrenal glands were designed to do, but when you eat sugar, white flour, lots of carbs, your body has to produce lots of insulin to unlock the insulin receptor sites at each cell to allow glucose in. Excess consumption of these things cause this spiking. Now your body says, whoa, too much glucose, so the pancreas produces lots of glucagon and your liver goes to work changing the glucose into glycogen for storage. This drives your blood sugar down quickly and says, "EMERGENCY" and your body goes into stress and produces lots of CORTISOL. Now the liver is reprioritized to deal with the emergency and your ESTROGEN does NOT get reconjugated and you become DEFICIENT. Low Lidido.

      All this is a result of your diet and your lazy doctor or maybe just ignorance, who knows.

      The first thing is to decide which is more important, the thyroid issue or the libido issue. Both are related, but it's important to understand your priorities. They are both very fixable and you may even get healthy during the process.

      Do a quick test on yourself and then e-mail me the results and I will help you. Get some "Tincture of Iodine" from the drug store and paint a patch 2" x 3" on your forearm. Do this in the morning. Then watch it during the day and note the time of day when it disappeared. Count the hours it took to disappear. It should be visible after 24 hours. If it goes away in a few hours, you are very deficient in iodine. Since your thyroid uses only about 4% of the iodine you have in your body, if you are deficient it takes time to correct this. A few months. Since the T3 and T4 hormones require iodine, if you are deficient, this is a major cause of the low thyroid issue, but ALL your organs and skin require iodine, so the deficiency is affecting not just your thyroid, if you are truly deficient.

      good luck

  19. QUESTION:
    Should I get my thyroid checked again? What else could be causing my symptoms?
    I have many of the symptoms of hypothyroidism (fatigue, decreased libido, unexplained weight gain, irritability, mild feelings of depression, random joint aches, and low body temperatures) but I got my thyroid checked a little bit less than a year ago.

    • ANSWER:
      YES! And perhaps you need a new doctor.

      TSH norm for 8 yrs has been .3 - 3 but most doctors still go by the old 'normal ranges' or worse (like one just told me this wk)...do not do anything unless it is over 10! Also, most doctors still do not test for antibodies. INSIST on it!

      There are MANY symptoms that thyroid disease carries...perhaps the doctors just like the money they are all making from treating the symptoms!

      Ck these:

      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon…
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

      God bless

  20. QUESTION:
    Can you fast during Ramadan if you have hypothyroidism?
    My doctor says no, but I have heard of several people fasting during this holy month and they have thyroid disease--their doctor said it was okay. Thoughts?

    • ANSWER:
      Honey, each person is different... Just because another person's hypothyroidism was such that it was acceptable to fast has no bearing what so ever on YOUR health.

      I have no idea what YOUR body is like...

      No one else here has any idea what YOUR body is like...

      OTHER PEOPLE WITH HYPOTHYROIDISM HAVE NO IDEA WHAT YOUR BODY IS LIKE...

      Listen to your doctor! S/he knows more about what is up with you than any stranger you meet on the Internet.

      What is healthy with one person can kill another... Your health is important... And your theism has rules about exceptions for ill health because your god doesn't want his followers to drop dead because "Everyone Else Says..."

      Hypothyroidism won't kill you but it can complicate your long term health.

      For those that don't know what she is talking about:

      Hypothyroidism Overview
      https://health.google.com/health/ref/Hypothyroidism
      Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland does not make enough thyroid hormone.

      Early symptoms:
      Being more sensitive to cold
      Constipation
      Depression
      Fatigue or feeling slowed down
      Heavier menstrual periods
      Joint or muscle pain
      Paleness or dry skin
      Thin, brittle hair or fingernails
      Weakness
      Weight gain (unintentional)

      Late symptoms, if left untreated:
      Decreased taste and smell
      Hoarseness
      Puffy face, hands, and feet
      Slow speech
      Thickening of the skin
      Thinning of eyebrows

      Treatment
      The purpose of treatment is to replace the thyroid hormone that is lacking. Levothyroxine is the most commonly used medication. Doctors will prescribe the lowest dose that effectively relieves symptoms and brings the TSH level to a normal range. If you have heart disease or you are older, your doctor may start with a very small dose.

      Lifelong therapy is required unless you have a condition called transient viral thyroiditis.

      You must continue taking your medication even when your symptoms go away. When starting your medication, your doctor may check your hormone levels every 2 - 3 months. After that, your thyroid hormone levels should be monitored at least every year.

      Important things to remember when you are taking thyroid hormone are:
      Do NOT stop taking the medication when you feel better. Continue taking the medication exactly as directed by your doctor.
      If you change brands of thyroid medicine, let your doctor know. Your levels may need to be checked.
      Some dietary changes can change the way your body absorbs the thryoid medicine. Talk with your doctor if you are eating a lot of soy products or a high-fiber diet.

      Thryoid medicine works best on an empty stomach and when taken 1 hour before any other medications. Do NOT take thyroid hormone with calcium, iron, multivitamins, alumin hydroxide antacids, colestipol, or other medicines that bind bile acids, or fiber supplements.

      After you start taking replacement therapy, tell your doctor if you have any symptoms of increased thyroid activity (hyperthyroidism) such as:
      Rapid weight loss
      Restlessness or shakiness
      Sweating
      Myxedema coma is a medical emergency that occurs when the body's level of thyroid hormones becomes extremely low. It is treated with intravenous thyroid hormone replacement and steroid medications. Some patients may need supportive therapy (oxygen, breathing assistance, fluid replacement) and intensive-care nursing.

      Causes
      The thyroid gland is located in the front of the neck just below the voice box (larynx). It releases hormones that control metabolism.

      The most common cause of hypothyroidism is inflammation of the thyroid gland, which damages the gland's cells. Autoimmune or Hashimoto's thyroiditis, in which the immune system attacks the thyroid gland, is the most common example of this. Some women develop hypothyroidism after pregancy (often referred to as "postpartum throiditis").

      Other common causes of hypothyroidism include:
      Congenital (birth) defects
      Radiation treatments to the neck to treat different cancers, which may also damage the thyroid gland
      Radioactive iodine used to treat an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism)
      Surgical removal of part or all of the thyroid gland, done to treat other thyroid problems
      Viral thyroiditis, which may case hyperthyroidism and is often followed by temporary or permanent hypothyroidism
      Certain drugs can cause hyperthyroidism, including:
      Amiodarone
      Drugs used for hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid), such as propylthiouracil (PTU) and methimazole
      Lithium
      Radiation to the brain

      Sheehan syndrome, a condition that may occur in a woman who bleeds severely during pregnancy or childbirth and causes destruction of the pituitary gland
      Risk factors include:
      Age over 50 years
      Being female

      Tests & diagnosis
      A physical examination may reveal a smaller-than-normal thyroid gland, although sometimes the gland is normal size or even enlarged (goiter). The examination may also reveal:
      Brittle nails
      Coarse facial features
      Pale or dry skin, which may be cool to the touch
      Swelling of the arms and legs
      Thin and brittle hair
      A chest x-ray may show an enlarged heart.
      Laboratory tests to determine thyroid function include:
      Serum TSH
      T4 test
      Lab tests may also reveal:
      Anemia on a complete blood count (CBC)
      Increased cholesterol levels
      Increased liver enzymes
      Increased prolactin
      Low sodium

      Prognosis
      In most cases, thyroid levels return to with proper treatment. However, thyroid hormone replacement must be taken for the rest of your life.
      Myxedema coma can result in death.

      Prevention
      There is no prevention for hypothyroidism.
      Screening tests in newborns can detect hypothyroidism that is present from birth (congenital hypothyroidism).

      Complications
      Myxedema coma, the most severe form of hypothyroidism, is rare. It may be caused by an infection, illness, exposure to cold, or certain medications in people with untreated hypothyroidism.
      Symptoms and signs of myxedema coma include:
      Below normal temperature
      Decreased breathing
      Low blood pressure
      Low blood sugar
      Unresponsiveness
      Other complications are:
      Heart disease
      Increased risk of infection
      Infertility
      Miscarriage
      People with untreated hypothyroidism are at increased risk for:
      Giving birth to a baby with birth defects
      Heart disease because of higher levels of LDL ("bad") cholesterol
      Heart failure

      People treated with too much thyroid hormone are at risk for angina or heart attack, as well as osteoporosis (thinning of the bones).

      When to contact a doctor
      Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of hypothyroidism (or myxedema).
      If you are being treated for hypothyroidism, call your doctor if:
      You develop chest pain or rapid heartbeat
      You have an infection
      Your symptoms get worse or do not improve with treatment
      You develop new symptoms

  21. QUESTION:
    Can you lose hair on your legs from a thyroid problem?
    I have many symptoms of a thyroid problem.
    I am a 51 year old male.

    Fatigue which I've had for many years.
    Always been colder than others but was tolerable.
    Strange ridges on my finger nails that started a few years ago.
    Thinning eyebrows.
    I started losing leg hair 5 years ago.
    Thought it was alopecia since I've had Vitiligo since 15 years old.
    I now have almost no hair on my entire legs, upper or lower.
    The hairs will break off then get a red pimple around the follicle then the hair dies.
    The bare parts are completely smooth not even any peach fuzz.
    About a year ago my legs started getting very cold.
    The rest of my body does too but the legs are the worst.
    Also started getting tingling and numbness in arms and legs, mostly legs and finger tips.
    Aches and pains all over body.
    I can feel that my thyroid is larger than it used to be.
    I have no health insurance and looking into a local low cost clinic.
    My main question is, Has anyone heard of just losing hair from just ones legs from a Thyroid problem?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes and all the rest of the symptoms that you named.

      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2, like maybe ONE) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (...OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

      You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. [anti-TPO and TgAb] They can code so that ins will pay.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless you

  22. QUESTION:
    I am a Hypothyroid since 12 yrs,iam on medication since then and my levels are perfect but now when i underwen?
    Now recently i had got my thyroid levels got checked and my T3,T4 levels are normal but TSH is 9.2 why is it so high.

    • ANSWER:
      Alright. The main reason in why people get low thyroid (hypothyroidism) can be because of genetics. If a dad or mom has low thyroid in the family , its possible for their children to also get low thyroid. This is a normal cause in why people get low thyroid. If one stops using their medication for low thyroid, their levels can increase, getting worse. You have to take your medication every day.

      Including, when one gets diagnosed with low thyroid, the levels can go down, but they can't become stable.. meaning that you have to take the medication for life.

      In my opinion, my best guess is that the reason your level increased is that you need a higher dose of the medication. Go back to your doctor and see if you need a increase in dosage. The medication that you have right now is not doing much to help out your body, so you might need a higher dosage level of the medication in order to have some effect.

  23. QUESTION:
    what is the best way, in additon to syntroid, to control your weight hen dealing with hypothyroidism?
    i was diagnosed with hypothyroidism and thyroid cancer in march of '06. my syntroid(replacement thyroid hormone) has been upped numerous times but i am still plagued by the excess weight my condition causes despite controlling my diet and exercise. is there something else i can be soing specific to my condition that can help boost my metabolism?

    • ANSWER:
      Is the doctor keeping the TSH suppressed because of your recent thyroid cancer. This is very important, so that none of the cancer cells come back. Plus, having a lower TSH should help in weight loss. If it doesn't, then maybe you need both T4 and T3 in the form of Armour. Synthoid is only T4.

      Thyroid links below.

  24. QUESTION:
    what is the best medication for an enlarged thyroid with a hypothyroid results in the blood test?
    i had my thyroid scan and appears very enlarged than the normal ones,my blood test says i am a hypothyroid person,my doctor advised me to radioactive iodine therapy,is it the best thing to do?

    • ANSWER:
      I think you might have the wrong word here. I think you are probably hyperthyroid, not hypothyroid.

      Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can cause an enlarged thyroid. If you are HYPOthyroid (high TSH/thyroglobluin and low T3/T4), radioactive iodine therapy is NEVER appropriate. However, if you are HYPERthyroid (low TSH/thyroglobulin and high T3/T4), then yes, RAI may be an appropriate therapy in consultation with your doctor.

      If you are HYPOthyroid, the appropriate treatment is replacement thyroid hormone. This could be any of several medications: levothyroxine, Synthroid, Levoxyl, Cytomel, Armour thyroid (natural desiccated thyroid), and others.

  25. QUESTION:
    Thyroid abnormal labs what does it mean?
    I have Thyroglobulin 201 (normal 0-74) and TSH 0.007 , normal t3 and t 4 endo doctor says it is just stress , my family dr says it's hyperthyroidism and need treat. Anyone here knows more about that? I am confused!

    • ANSWER:
      Most people with low TSH have hyperthyroidism but along with that your T3 and T4 levels should be high, T3 & T4 free values may be a better indicator.

      Rarely there is a problem with the pituitary gland, TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) is produced by the pituitary. This can cause hypothyroidism, but you would also have low T3 and T4 values.

      Did I add to the confusion? I would look at your symptoms, ask your doctor if an MRI of your pituitary is needed. I think the pituitary may be the problem, whether stress is the cause or not.

      http://www.labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/thyroglobulin/test.html

      Small amounts of thyroglobulin are normal in patients with normal thyroid function. Patients with an enlarged thyroid gland (goiter), thyroiditis (inflamed thyroid), or hyperthyroidism may have elevated thyroglobulin levels, although the test is not routinely ordered with these conditions.

      I am not a doctor an my opinions should not be taken as gospel. I had my thyroid removed after cancer and my knowledge is limited.

  26. QUESTION:
    what does 0.68 for tsh level mean.my doctor says it is close to hyperthyroid but I have symptoms of hypothyroi?
    I am very overweight and getting worse. My hair is thin. I had problems with my periods for years. I took hormone pills had a d n c and then had a hysterectomy because they couldn't figure out what the problem was.

    • ANSWER:
      It's now more than six years since the experts have established that this new, narrower TSH normal range of 0.3 to 3.0 is a more accurate one, and recommended that it become the standard of practice. Yet, the dithering continues. Some doctors use the new range for diagnosis and therapeutic management -- others refuse to consider anything unless it's marked "High" or "Low" on laboratory reports

      Remember that you can have both hypo and hyper.Heres a statement from someone that had both.
      Both Hashimoto's and Graves' disease antibodies, which puts the thyroid into a push-pull situation, where it cycles up and down through hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism.

      Hashi dominate with Graves' secondary or Graves' dominate with Hashi secondary, are people with equal amounts of both stimulating and blocking TSH receptor antibodies.

      A person may present features of one of these disorders at one time and features of the other at another time. However, they both can't present features of both at the same time. Therefore, treatment is at the moment of the prevailing disorder.

      Some even believe that hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, including Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, as different phases of the same disease. Graves’ disease, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, idiopathic thyroid failure and Hashitoxicosis are all closely associated and sometimes overlapping syndromes that cause symptoms of thyroid disease. .Goe to my source , it really is interesting. I really took time to look this up , so I really hopes this helps.

      Tin

  27. QUESTION:
    what does it mean that i have a slightly alivated TSH count?
    6.5 mlul/l
    i know that it has to do with regulating the thyroid gland. but what does it mean that it's elevated? what are the effects? what are the causes?

    • ANSWER:
      Reference ranges vary from lab to lab, but usually anything above 5.0 is considered in the hypothyroid range (under active thyroid). Low energy, dry hair and skin, difficulty losing weight and cold intolerance are just some of the few effect that can happen with hypothyroidism. It depends what type of hypothyroidism you have, but some are caused by a deficiency of iodine and some by a lack of the thyroid gland or a deficiency of hormones from either the hypothalamus or the pituitary. You might be advised to go on Levothyroxine to lower your TSH to the normal range.

  28. QUESTION:
    What can I do naturally to boost my thyroid, I'm a vegetarian?.?
    I have symptoms of hypothyroidism.
    I went to the doctor , but wont get the results until Monday.

    • ANSWER:
      It depends on what is causing your hypothyroid. Have you been diagnosed by a physician? It all depends on your TSH levels, and the effect it has on your T3-T4 levels. If you have a high TSH and still low T3 and T4, then your problem is one of a faulty receptor. Which can be caused by an auto immune disorder or genetics. Estrogen can also cause an increase in a protein that will bind more T3 (the more potient of the Ts), this can be caused if you are a woman taking oral contraceptive that contains estrogen. So one way to boost free T3 is to stop taking oral contraceptive. (This is by no means anywhere close to taking synthroid, which is what you should do!)
      Situation two, If TSH is low and T3& T4 are also low, then something could be wrong with your pituitary function. There are a number of things that could cause this, but there is no home remedy that would really help the situation. You would need to go into your physician. I'm sure that you have one if you are talking like this. Good luck. I hope everything turns out well, and whatever you do talk to your physician.

  29. QUESTION:
    What happens if I have a thyroid problem?
    I think I may have this because im always tired and get very very tired easily, im demotivated most or all of the time. If I do have this then I will have to take medication for this, but medications make you fatter and bloated. Any one help, what should I do?

    • ANSWER:
      Common symptoms of hypothyroidism are:

      * Fatigue or lack of energy
      * Weight gain
      * Feeling cold
      * Dry skin and hair
      * Heavy menstrual periods
      * Constipation
      * Slowed thinking

      hyprh401.gif - 10.6 K

      DIAGNOSIS of hypothyroidism is usually straightforward, once it is suspected. Patients with hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto's thyroiditis have an elevated level of serum TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone). However, the rare patient with hypothyroidism due to a pituitary or hypothalamic condition may have a normal or low serum TSH.

      TREATMENT of hypothyroidism consists of taking thyroid hormone in pill form on a daily basis. Symptoms of hypothyroidism should clear up within a few months of starting treatment. Adjustment of the dose of thyroid pills is based upon measurements of serum TSH. Most patients need to take thyroid hormone for life.
      HYPERTHYROIDISM (Overactive Thyroid)

      The most common cause of hyperthyroidism is Graves' disease. This occurs when the body's immune system overstimulates the thyroid.

      Common symptoms of hyperthyroidism are:

      * Jitteriness, shaking, increased nervousness, irritability
      * Rapid heart beat or palpitations
      * Feeling hot
      * Weight loss
      * Fatigue, feeling exhausted
      * More frequent bowel movements
      * Shorter or lighter menstrual periods

  30. QUESTION:
    My blood sugar is like a roller coaster and I don't know what to do?
    I am a struggling student with no insurance so I cannot afford a doctor. So far, I have been maintaining my sugar with diet, but this doesn't seem to be working lately. It drops so low that I break out in huge sweats and then I have migraines as a result. I try to keep something on my stomach at all times, but this is beginning to worry me.
    I truly do not know what to do. Any advice?

    P.S. My glucose monitor said my last test was a 42. That's pretty low right?

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like hypoglycemia to me. Many things can cause this, one is hypothyroidism. Does your sugar go high too? Anywhere from 70 to 110 is normal and okay.

      If you have hypoglycemia, your best course of action is to eat frequent, small, well balanced meals a day. You should be eating about 6 meals a day. They all should be equal.

      Stay away from sugar, simple carbs, soft drinks, and alcohol. This can't be over emphasized. The alcohol will especially cause drops in blood sugar is you're hypoglycemic. I suffered from this for years so I know what I'm talking about. When I was in college a did some ocassional drinking and boy did I pay for it the next morning! I haven't had alcohol, except for a couple of sips at one wedding and one Christmas dinner, for over 25 years.

      Your meals need to consist of a lean meat, a complex fibrous carb and a complex starchy carb. Your protein should be from lean meats, 3 to 4 ounces - the size of a deck of cards. Your complex carbs need to come from two groups. You need fibrous carbs (such as; lettuce, bell peppers, mushrooms, apples, pears, etc.) and starchy carbs (such as; brown rice, yams, old fashioned oatmeal [no instant or quick], winter squashes, whole grain or sprouted grain breads, etc.). Good in between meal snacks are peanut butter on celery, a handful of nuts (peanut, almonds, or walnuts), homemade nut bars, fruit and nuts, etc. Apples can have a neutralizing effect on too much sugar in the blood stream. They are great to have in the morning with oatmeal, an egg, and milk.

      Does your college have a low cost clinic? If so, go there and get your TSH, Free T3, and Free T4 tested for thyroid disease. For your blood sugar, get your glucose tested.

      Or you can go to healthcheckusa.com and order lab tests. You don't need a doctor's order to get tests done. The catch is you need to have the tests performed at their associated labs. Be sure to thoroughly read their site before ordering to make sure there's a testing place near you.

      Good luck!

  31. QUESTION:
    What if your thyroid levels are normal and you are still depressed?
    My levels we're way off before but now I'm taking medication and the doctors say my levels are fine but my depression is very much the same.

    • ANSWER:
      The most common cause of hypothyroidism is hashimoto's thyroiditis (autoimmune hypothyroidism). This condition causes genetic issues with vitamin D absorption. To confirm hashimoto's - thyroid antibodies tests (TPO - elevated in 90% of hashimoto's patients and TgAb) will be higher than normal. Low vitamin D levels are well known to cause depression. Anyone with hashimoto's thyroiditis is recommended to take between 5000 - 20 000 IU of vitamin D daily.

      Deficiencies commonly seen with hypothyroidism are vitamin B12, folate, vitamin D, iron, zinc, potassium, magnesium. Low levels of vitamin B12 can also lead to depression.

      T4 synthetic medication doesn't address the antibodies attacking the thyroid and many find they do not get rid of their symptoms with a T4 only medication. Some feel better on a combination of T4 and T3 synthetic medication and others feel better on natural desiccated thyroid extract. 200mcg of selenium daily (supplements or a few brazil nuts) has shown in studies to lowers TPO antibodies and a gluten free diet also lowers thyroid antibodies. Natural desiccated thyroid extract can lower antibodies if high enough. An excerpt from Stop The Thyroid Madness....

      "And what do uninformed doctors do for the symptoms you continue to have on T4-only meds? They put you on anti-depressants, statins, pain meds, and all sorts of bandaid medications to cover the effects of a poor thyroid treatment—chronic low grade depression, high cholesterol, “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome”, “Fibromyalgia”, bi-polar, anxiety, hair loss… to name just a few. When you mention your poor energy levels, they tell you to exercise more. When you mention your weight problems, they tell you to eat less.

      And the worst thing they’ll say when you continue to have symptoms of a thyroid disorder? “It’s not your thyroid. Your TSH is normal, and you’re optimally treated.” That, friends, is not so… and has lead most all thyroid patients into continuing agony and self-doubt." >>> http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/t4-only-meds-dont-work/

  32. QUESTION:
    How to treat and what is Hyperthyroidism?
    .I was wondering what can happen if I don't get this treated? I've had it for a long time. It runs in my family.
    My conditions are that I never gain weight, I eat all the time, my heart beats faster when I'm sitting down. I'm also underweight.
    Are there anyone out there that has this treated or have this? What can I do to get it treated?
    Also what is it?
    Thanks for all you answers.

    • ANSWER:
      Definition

      Hyperthyroidism is a condition caused by an overactive thyroid gland. The gland makes too much T4 and T3 hormones. Hormones are substances that affect and control many important functions in the body.

      Alternative Names
      Thyrotoxicosis; Overactive thyroid

      Causes, incidence, and risk factors

      The thyroid gland is located in the neck. It produces several hormones which control the way that every cell in the body uses energy (metabolism). The thyroid is part of the endocrine system.

      Hyperthyroidism or thyrotoxicosis occurs when the thyroid releases too many of its hormones over a short (acute) or long (chronic) period of time. Many diseases and conditions can cause this problem, including:

      Graves disease
      Non-cancerous growths of the thyroid gland or pituitary gland
      Tumors of the testes or ovaries
      Inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the thyroid due to viral infections or other causes
      Ingestion (taking in through the mouth, such as in eating) of large amounts of thyroid hormone
      Ingestion of excessive iodineGraves disease accounts for 85% of all cases of hyperthyroidism.

      Related topics:

      Painless (silent thyroiditis
      Factitious hyperthyroidism
      Hypothyroidism
      Graves disease

      Symptoms

      Weight loss
      Increased appetite
      Nervousness
      Restlessness
      Heat intolerance
      Increased sweating
      Fatigue
      Frequent bowel movements
      Menstrual irregularities in women
      Goiter (visibly enlarged thyroid) may be present
      Additional symptoms that may be associated with this disease:
      Weakness
      Sleeping difficulty
      Clammy skin
      Skin blushing or flushing
      Bounding pulse
      Nausea and vomiting
      Lack of menstruation
      Itching - overall
      Heartbeat sensations
      Hand tremor
      Hair loss
      Diarrhea
      Breast development in men
      High blood pressure
      Protruding eyes (exophthalmos)

      Signs and tests

      Physical examination may reveal thyroid enlargement or goiter. Vital signs (temperature, pulse, rate of breathing, blood pressure) show increased heart rate. Systolic blood pressure (the first number in a blood pressure reading) may be high.

      Laboratory tests that evaluate thyroid function:

      Serum TSH is usually low
      T3 and free T4 are usually high
      This disease may also alter the results of the following tests:
      Vitamin B-12
      TSI
      Triglycerides
      RT3U
      Radioactive iodine uptake
      Glucose test
      Cholesterol test
      Antithyroglobulin antibody

      Treatment

      Treatment varies depending on the cause of the condition and the severity of symptoms. Hyperthyroidism is usually treated with antithyroid medications, radioactive iodine (which destroys the thyroid and stops the excess production of hormones), or surgery to remove the thyroid.

      If the thyroid must be removed with radiation or surgery, replacement thyroid hormones must be taken for the rest of the person's life.

      Beta-blockers like propranolol are used to treat some of the symptoms including rapid heart rate, sweating, and anxiety until the hyperthyroidism can be controlled.

      Expectations (prognosis)

      Hyperthyroidism caused by Graves disease is usually progressive and has many associated complications, some of which are severe and affect quality of life.

      These include complications caused by treatment such as use of radioactive iodine, surgery, and medications to replace thyroid hormones. However, hyperthyroidism is generally treatable and rarely fatal.

      Complications

      Heart-related complications include rapid heart rate, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation.

      Thyroid crisis or storm is an acute worsening of the symptoms of hyperthyroidism that may occur with infection or stress. Fever, decreased mental alertness, and abdominal pain may occur, and immediate hospitalization is needed.

      Hyperthyroidism increases the risk for osteoporosis.
      There may be complications related to surgery, including visible scarring of the neck, hoarseness due to nerve damage to the voice box, and a low calcium level because of damage to the parathyroid glands.

      Complications may be related to replacement of thyroid hormones. If too little hormone is given, symptoms of under-active thyroid can occur including fatigue, increased cholesterol levels, mild weight gain, depression, and slowing of mental and physical activity. If too much hormone is given, the symptoms of hyperthyroidism will come back.

      Calling your health care provider

      Call your health care provider if you have symptoms which could be caused by excessive thyroid hormone production. If the symptoms are associated with a rapid, irregular heartbeat, dizziness, or change in consciousness, go to the emergency room or call the local emergency number (such as 911).

      Call your health care provider if treatment for hyperthyroidism induces symptoms of under-active thyroid, including mental and physical sluggishness, weight gain, and depression.

      Prevention

      There are no general prevention measures to prevent hyperthyroidism.

  33. QUESTION:
    Did you get really pale skin with hypothyroidism?
    I recently found out I have hypothyroidism I noticed my skin has recently (last 6 months) got really really pale. You can see a lot of my veins especially in my thighs and legs, did anyone else notice this? I know the "common" symptoms and signs of hypo but what were some uncommon ones you noticed? Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      Yes!

      Here are some of the possibles:
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.
      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.
      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      There are even more than these....the thyroid, like the heart, effects everything in your body!

      TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

  34. QUESTION:
    What's the best alternative for Synthroid for Hypothryoidism?
    I've been hearing a lot of Thyrolar as a safer alternative for Synthroid. I've been having a lot of problems with hair falling out while using Synthroid and I'm only 20 years old. It's bad enough I have a thyroid issue, I don't need to be bald this early in my life. Has anyone else with Hypoactive Thyroidism found a better solution for treatment? What has worked best for you?

    • ANSWER:
      Homeopathic Medicines works very well in both Hypothyroidism and Hyperthyroidism, below you will find the symptoms and the head remedies used in Homeopathy to treat Thyroid Disorders please read carefully and I would suggest you consult a good Homeopathic physician in your locality.

      Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the body lacks sufficient thyroid hormone. Since the main purpose of thyroid hormone is to "run the body's metabolism", it is understandable that people with this condition will have symptoms associated with a slow metabolism.

      Hypothyroidism - CAUSE
      There are two fairly common causes of hypothyroidism. The first is a result of previous (or currently ongoing) inflammation of the thyroid gland which leaves a large percentage of the cells of the thyroid damaged (or dead) and incapable of producing sufficient hormone. The most common cause of thyroid gland failure is called autoimmune thyroiditis (also called Hashimoto's thyroiditis), a form of thyroid inflammation caused by the patient's own immune system. The second major cause is the broad category of "medical treatments". As noted on a number of our other pages, the treatment of many thyroid conditions warrants surgical removal of a portion or all of the thyroid gland. If the total mass of thyroid producing cells left within the body are not enough to meet the needs of the body, the patient will develop hypothyroidism.

      Hypothyroidism - SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
      Fatigue
      Weakness
      Weight gain or increased difficulty losing weight
      Coarse, dry hair
      Dry, rough pale skin
      Hair loss
      Cold intolerance (can't tolerate the cold like those around you)
      Muscle cramps and frequent muscle aches
      Constipation
      Depression
      Irritability
      Memory loss
      Abnormal menstrual cycles
      Decreased libido

      Hypothyroidism - HOMEOPATHIC TREATMENT & Medicines
      Homeopathy offers good prognosis to cases of hypothyroidism. Medicines like Calcare phos, Calcarea carb, Lapis alb, Iodium, Thyroidinum, Spongia, Lycopus, Calcarea iod etc are often found indicated in cases of hypothyroidism.
      ______________________________________

      Hyperthyroidism is due to an excess amount of free thyroid hormone. There is a generalized increase in metabolic rate, with an increase in oxygen use.

      Hyperthyroidism - SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
      The symptoms of hyperthyroidism include heat intolerance, nervousness, increased irritability, palpitations, weight loss with the same or increased food intake, and increased frequency of defecation. Women may have a decreased frequency of menses. Physical findings may include hyperkinesis, warm moist skin, a prominent stare and lid lag. The neurological exam may show a fine tremor and a fast return phase for the deep tendon reflexes. The cardiac exam reveals signs associated with a high cardiac output, including tachycardia, although atrial fibrillation is also common, a prominent S4, and flow murmurs. The thyroid gland may be diffusely enlarged, nodular, or even normal in size. Signs and symptoms may range from very mild to severe. Laboratory tests almost always show a low TSH and a high T3. The total and free T4 are also usually increased.

      Hyperthyroidism - HOMEOPATHIC TREATMENT & Medicines
      Homeopathy offers good prognosis to cases of hyperthyroidism. Medicines like Calcare phos, Calcarea carb, Lapis alb, Iodium, Thyroidinum, Spongia, Lycopus, Calcarea iod etc are often found indicated in cases of hyperthyroidism.

      Best of Health to you.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  35. QUESTION:
    Is there even a slight chance I could have a thyroid problem?
    My mood is absolutely amazing before my period and during my period and it dramatically drops the day my period ends. I feel it slipping, it's a horrible feeling. I don't function properly, have no concentration whatsoever, I don't have them all of the time but when I do something like go to the shop when I'm feeling like this I feel a tightness in my head. I've never had a headache or migraine so I have no idea how they feel... It hurts slighty but goes once I'm rested. I tend to eat far more and don't have any interest or motivation in doing anything or even doing my make up and getting dressed in the mornings. I wake atleast an hour later and I feel like I literally haven't slept at all. My Mam has an under-active thyroid(hypothyroidism), could I have this too?

    I'm honestly so sick of this, I've to bare with this thing going on, which I have no idea what it is for two weeks out of each month and I have been dealing with it for 15 months.

    I thought I had PMT/PMS last year so I went to the doctor (trying) to explain what was going on, but she didn't really understand because I can't properly explain or think when I'm like this. She put me on the birth control pill, 'Yasminelle'. This had no effect whatsoever as it is a low dose so I later went back about 5 months later and she decided the higher dose, 'Yasmin' would properly work. I've been off it for 6 months now, and I'm still so puzzled of what's wrong with me?I'm really stuck.

    Sorry if this all sounds confusing, it's confusing for myself too. Please answer if you go through/went through this horrible low mood after your period. I will award 'best answer' too.
    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      Actually it is more than a SLIGHT chance!

      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2, like maybe ONE) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (...OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

      You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. [anti-TPO and TgAb] They can code so that ins will pay.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless you

  36. QUESTION:
    what does it mean when your thyroid is producing antibodies?
    since i have history of thyroid problems in my family, i went to the doctor to get my blood tested and they said i'm beginning to produce antibodies against my thyroid...what does this mean exactly?

    • ANSWER:
      They probably checked your Thyroid Peroxidase or TPO level in your blood. This is a type of protein that forms to attack your thyroid and destroy it. It is called Hashimotos thyroiditis - named after the japanese doctor who first discovered the presence of antibodies. This is a common form of hypothyroidism - and shows an inflammation of the thyroid caused by the attacking antibodies. Depending on your other thyroid test results - and especially if you have symptoms and your TSH was above 3 you can ask your doctor for a low dose of thyroid hormone supplementation. Also - should retest your numbers often to see how the meds are working. Antibodies will decrease after years of being on thyroid medication and their level may not ever become normal, but I have heard that it is possible in some cases. Good luck to you!

  37. QUESTION:
    Can a goiter grow back after being removed?
    I had one side of my thyroid surgically removed along with the goiter growing on that side. How likely is the other thyroid to develop a goiter now that it is working all by itself? How can I prevent a goiter from recurring?

    • ANSWER:
      The most common cause for goitre in the world is iodine deficiency (E01); this condition is commonly called endemic goitre. It is curable by mass food-supplementation with iodine (in the form of iodide or iodate), and today remains a problem only in the least affluent countries which lack economic resources to fortify foods with iodine as part of public health programs.

      You must identify how and why you got a Goitre

      A "diffuse goitre" is a goitre that has spread through all of the thyroid (and is contrasted with a "simple goitre", "single thyroid nodule" and "multinodular goitre").
      "Toxic goitre" refers to goitre with hyperthyroidism. These are derived from inflammation, neoplasm, and some kinds of activating autoimmune disease (Graves' disease).
      "Nontoxic goitre" (associated with normal or low thyroid levels) refers to all other types (such as that caused by lithium or certain other autoimmune diseases).

      Other causes are:

      Hashimoto's thyroiditis
      Graves-Basedow disease
      Juvenile goitre due to congenital hypothyroidism
      Neoplasm of the thyroid
      Thyroiditis (acute, chronic)
      Side-effects of pharmacological therapy

      Iodine is necessary for the synthesis of the thyroid hormones triiodothyronine and thyroxine (T3 and T4). In conditions producing endemic goitre, when iodine is not available, these hormones cannot be made. In response to low thyroid hormones, the pituitary gland releases thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Thyroid stimulating hormone acts to increase synthesis of T3 and T4, but in excess it also causes the thyroid gland to grow in size as a type of compensation.

      Goitre is more common among women, but this includes the many types of goitre caused by autoimmune problems, and not only those caused by simple lack of iodine.

  38. QUESTION:
    Why is my thyroid level all over the place?
    I have an underactive thyroid, and last time I went to the doctors my thyroid level was too low. This week my bloods say it's too high. It has fluctuated for the past 10 months (when I was first diagnosed). What could be causing it not to settle?

    • ANSWER:
      When you were first diagnosed with what? That is exactly the way that untreated Hashimoto's works.

      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (...OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

      You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. They can code so that ins will pay.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

      God bless you

  39. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of a thyroid problem?
    I've already asked a thyroid question, but the only answer i got was that i didn't list enough symptoms. My mother wants me to get checked out by a doctor and i would like to know if i have any symptoms i didn't know was associated with a thyroid problem. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold and/or heat, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.

      The physical examination often reveals the hair to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight, but may also be underweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow even though the patient is not a well-trained athlete.

      If the average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit, then the diagnosis of a low functioning thyroid system is likely. An average temperature above 98.2 is considered high and might reflect a hyperthyroid condition.

      Need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH should be .3 – 3 but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse ...OR Graves Disease (hypER).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. May have to go to more than one before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  40. QUESTION:
    Should I be worried about all of these symptoms?
    I have blurry vision, sharp chest pains at random parts of the day, lower back pain, muscle pain and difficulty concentration as well as forget fullness. I have hypothyroidism but before we could stabilize the medicine my family couldn't afford to get my blood work done again. I'm 18 now and the last time I took my Levothyroxin is when I was 16. I'm terrified about going into a coma or losing all my hair, but I don't know how I'm supposed to get an appoinment and then the medicine and blood work to stabalize it.

    • ANSWER:
      I know what you mean. The meds are not that expensive ... it is the OV's and Labs! You may have to go to ER where the tests would be done. It is important though that you have those rechecks as it usually takes rechecking every 4 wks, for the 1st few mos, to get the dosage right, then every 6 mos thereafter. The rechecks are not as much as the original where you should have had ALL the thyroid tests (including testing for ANTIBODIES).

      Here is more info:
      TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      God bless

  41. QUESTION:
    Is there a single medication that can help both depression and high blood pressure?
    I also have anxiety and it would be nice if there was one med for all instead of 2 to 3 different ones.

    • ANSWER:
      Yep. The answer is thyroid medication (not Synthroid). Has been used for all three symptoms for over a 100 years. The thyroid function tests are useless so most people with hypothyroidism are undiagnosed and walking around with fatigue, high blood pressure, DEPRESSION, weigh gain, dry skin, puffiness, high cholesterol, but their doc says their tests are "normal". Find someone who treats to symptoms not blood tests. Good Luck.

      Myth #1: The TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) blood test is the only way to diagnose hypothyroidism/low thyroid.

      Facts: First, there is no perfect test in medicine—not the TSH or any other. Second, nearly a century before the TSH test was developed, doctors made the diagnosis of hypothyroidism without any tests at all. They listened to their patients and examined them. Since then, there have been many tests that have been blindly followed until they proved to be unreliable and were discarded.

      To this day, there are at least three types of hypothyroidism for which the TSH test does not even test. The TSH is not a useful test for hypothyroidism caused by dysfunction of the pituitary gland or of the hypothalamus (part of the brain,) or for hypothyroidism caused by "tissue resistance" to the effects of thyroid hormone.

      My conclusion: The TSH test can miss the diagnosis of hypothy-
      roidism. To most accurately identify hypothyroidism, I start with the approach that has worked for over a century. I listen to the patient and look for evidence of low thyroid function. If the patient appears hypothyroid, I order blood tests including the TSH, but I also (1) check basal body temperature,1 and (2) check the urine thyroid hormone levels.2 I then interpret all test results in the context of the
      individual patient.

      Myth #2: Normalizing the TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) blood test is the best way to treat hypothyroidism.

      Fact:Many studies have shown adjusting thyroid doses to normalize the TSH blood test leaves many patients with symptoms of low thyroid. World-renowned thyroid specialist, Sir Anthony Toft, MD, discussed this sad fact in 2002. In a speech to the British Endocrine Society, Dr. Toft reviewed some of the evidence that demonstrated that the modern TSH-centered approach was ineffective. He concluded, "...the treatment of hypothyroidism is about to come full circle"—going back to the approach that worked so well before all of our modern tests and treatments were invented.3

      My conclusion: Using the patient as my guide, I focus on reversing the signs and symptoms of low thyroid function while avoiding side effects or signs of thyroid excess. When the TSH is normal but the patient continues to be symptomatic, I prefer to err on the side of treating the patient—not normalizing the blood test.

      Myth #3: Thyroid treatment that reduces the TSH to below the normal range (TSH suppression) has been shown to be harmful, causing atrial fibrillation (a heart rhythm abnormality) and bone thinning.

      Facts: When thyroid hormone is given to a patient, TSH levels decrease. Some say that thyroid treatment that reduces the TSH to below the normal range causes bone thinning and atrial fibrillation.

      Before the TSH test was invented, generations of patients flourished on doses of thyroid medicine that routinely suppress the TSH. To this day, patients with thyroid cancer who are given doses to intentionally suppress the TSH, do very well on this regimen. In 2004, after review of the scientific literature, the US Preventive Services Task Force—a leading authority—addressed the question and concluded that despite the multitude of studies, there remains no proof that TSH suppression
      is dangerous.4

      My conclusions: Listen to the patient, examine the patient and adjust treatment until the patient is well. A century of medical experience and scientific evidence indicate that giving a patient enough thyroid hormone to make them well is a reasonable and safe approach. Blood tests, urine tests and tracking body temperatures all provide additional information, but no one test should be blindly followed.

      Myth #4: Natural thyroid extracts are dangerous because they are not regulated and not consistent in dose.

      Fact: Natural thyroid extracts such as Armour Thyroid are FDA approved prescription medications that contain all 4 human thyroid hormones (T1, T2, T3 and T4.) They are prepared in accordance with the U.S. Pharmacopeia.5 Synthetic thyroid extracts, such as levothyroxine contain only T4 and are also FDA approved.

      Ironically, synthetic T4 preparations seem to have had many more problems with dose consistency than has Armour Thyroid. FDA records show repeated problems with potency and consistency for T4 products including Synthroid.6,7

      My conclusion: There is no evidence that natural thyroid extracts such as Armour Thyroid are unsafe or any more dangerous than synthetic thyroid treatments. In fact, my experience is that natural thyroid extracts are much more effective at re

  42. QUESTION:
    What are the main symptoms of obesity and starvation?
    What are the main symptoms of obesity and starvation... please include which organs are affected!

    • ANSWER:
      Obesity and starvation have opposing affects on normal physiology and are associated with adaptive changes in hormone secretion. The effects of obesity and starvation on thyroid hormone, GH, and cortisol secretion are summarized in Table 1. Although hypothyroidism is associated with some weight gain, surveys of obese individuals show that less than 10% are hypothyroid. Discrepancies have been reported in some studies, but in untreated obesity, total and free T4, total and free T3, TSH levels, and the TSH response to TRH are normal. Some reports suggest an increase in total T3 and decrease in rT3 induced by overfeeding. Treatment of obesity with hypocaloric diets causes changes in thyroid function that resemble sick euthyroid syndrome. Changes consist of a decrease in total T4 and total and free T3 with a corresponding increase in rT3. untreated obesity is also associated with low GH levels; however, levels of IGF-1 are normal. GH-binding protein levels are increased and the GH response to GHRH is decreased. These changes are reversed by drastic weight reduction. Cortisol levels are abnormal in people with abdominal obesity who exhibit an increase in urinary free cortisol but exhibit normal or decreased serum cortisol and normal ACTH levels. These changes are explained by an increase in cortisol clearance. There is also an increased response to CRH. Treatment of obesity with very low calorie diets causes a decrease in serum cortisol explained by a decrease in cortisol-binding proteins. The increase in cortisol secretion seen in patients with abdominal obesity may contribute to the metabolic syndrome (insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension). States of chronic starvation such as seen in anorexia nervosa are also associated with changes in thyroid hormone, GH, and cortisol secretion. There is a decrease in total and free T4 and T3, and an increase in rT3 similar to findings in sick euthyroid syndrome. The TSH response to TRH is diminished and, in severe cases, thyroid-binding protein levels are decreased. In regards to GH, there is an increase in GH secretion with a decrease in IGF-1 levels. GH responses to GHRH are increased. The [table: see text] changes in cortisol secretion in patients with anorexia nervosa resemble depression. They present with increased urinary free cortisol and serum cortisol levels but without changes in ACTH levels. In contrast to the findings observed in obesity, the ACTH response to CRH is suppressed, suggesting an increased secretion of CRH. The endocrine changes observed in obesity and starvation may complicate the diagnosis of primary endocrine diseases. The increase in cortisol secretion in obesity needs to be distinguished from Cushing's syndrome, the decrease in thyroid hormone levels in anorexia nervosa needs to be distinguished from secondary hypothyroidism, and the increase in cortisol secretion observed in anorexia nervosa requires a differential diagnosis with primary depressive disorder.

  43. QUESTION:
    What do all my symptoms add up to?
    For the last few months I have been feeling really sick. I thought it might be that I am pregnant but i've taken 6 tests that have comeout negative. I am always tired, sleepy, low energy or interest in things, moody/emotional, nauseus (specially in the morning-last week vomited twice). I just can't figure it out. What do i have?

    • ANSWER:
      Low mood will make people say depression...but I would consider doing some reading on 'hormone imbalances'...

      Your symptoms sound like maybe thyroid or adrenal fatigue.

      Those imbalances can cause intestinal and stomach issues... too.

      Thyroid Slowdown: Could Your Thyroid be Underactive?
      It may start with a feeling of tiredness. A regular night’s sleep is no longer enough, and you wake up feeling exhausted. You may be gaining weight, even though you haven’t changed your diet and exercise program. Or you’ve decided to lose some weight, but despite carefully following a diet and exercise plan, the scale isn’t budging an ounce. Perhaps you’re struggling with a case of the blues — along with fuzzy, muddled thinking – and you’re feeling down, or finding it hard to concentrate or remember things.

      It’s tempting for you and your doctor to write off these symptoms as signs of middle age, not enough exercise, lack of sleep, or stress. But for millions of us, these symptoms are actually signs of a common – but often undiagnosed – hormonal deficiency known as hypothyroidism.

      The thyroid – the master gland of metabolism – is located in the neck below and behind the Adam’s apple. In hypothyroidism, the thyroid is underactive, and isn’t producing enough thyroid hormone. Without thyroid hormone, cells and tissues become starved for energy, and the body and its systems slow down.

      Hypothyroidism causes a whole range of symptoms that can include:

      • Extreme or unusual fatigue or exhaustion
      • Depression or moodiness
      • Weight gain with no change in exercise or diet
      • Inability to lose weight despite proper exercise and diet
      • Hair loss from the head, and sometimes the outer edge of the eyebrow
      • Coarse, rough, and/or dry hair
      • Pale, dry, cracked or itchy skin, chronic hives
      • Constipation
      • Menstrual irregularities
      • Infertility or recurrent miscarriage
      • Low sex drive
      • Feeling cold when it’s hot, low body temperature
      • High cholesterol, including levels resistant or unresponsive to drug or dietary treatment
      • Brain fog, difficulty concentrating, memory problems
      • Slow pulse and/or unusually low blood pressure in a non-athlete
      • Irritated eyes, dryness, sensitivity to light
      • Low, husky, and/or hoarse voice
      • Neck enlargement, discomfort, fullness, pressure, difficulty swallowing
      • Muscle and joint aches and pains
      • Puffiness and swelling, especially hands, feet, eyes and face

      Thyroid conditions are common – some experts estimate that close to 60 million Americans have a thyroid problem, and the majority are hypothyroid. Unfortunately, the vast majority of people with thyroid disease also have not been diagnosed or treated.

      When diagnosing hypothyroidism, your doctor should listen carefully to your description of your symptoms. At the same time, in addition to taking a complete personal and family history, your doctor should perform a thorough clinical evaluation. In this exam, the practitioner should:

      • Test your Achilles reflex – the doctor taps on your Achilles tendon along the back of your heel, which causes your calf muscle to contract and your foot to jerk down. A slower than normal reaction suggests hypothyroidism.
      • Measure your heart rate and take a blood pressure reading
      • Palpate your neck and thyroid area, to feel for enlargement of the thyroid, or any lumps and nodules
      • Observe your hair and skin, and look for any swelling or puffiness in face, hands and feet

      Based on these examinations, some doctors can already make a fairly accurate diagnosis. But it is at this point that they vary in how they proceed.

      Some doctors routinely perform a blood test, known as the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) test. This test measures levels of TSH, a pituitary hormone, to assess the thyroid’s function. While many conventional practitioners believe this test to be the “gold standard” for diagnosing thyroid disease, they disagree about how to interpret the results. On one side are the laboratories and doctors who follow the older TSH normal range of approximately 0.5 to 5.0. (Low levels of TSH are indicative of hyperthyroidism, and higher TSH levels are indicative of hypothyroidism.)

      On the other side of the debate are the doctors who adopted new guidelines recommended by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists in 2003. These new guidelines set the TSH normal range from 0.3 to 3.0. Unfortunately, this disagreement among practitioners leaves the estimated 20 million or more Americans with a TSH of between 3.0 and 5.0 in limbo. Their ability to get properly diagnosed and treated depends on finding a doctor and laboratory that follow the new guidelines.

      Other practitioners believe that a TSH test alone is not sufficient for diagnosis, and they conduct additional tests such as Free T4 and Free T3 to evaluate specific thyroid hormone levels. Some doctors run antibody tests to identify autoimmune thyroid disease. Some doctors will treat patients based on abnormalities in these tests, even when TSH is normal.

      Finally, there are holistic and integrative practitioners who believe that patients with a high index of suspicion for thyroid disease, – for example, they have a combination of symptoms, clinical signs, and/or family history – should receive a therapeutic trial of a thyroid hormone replacement. These doctors believe that even if TSH and other test results show “normal” thyroid function, the thyroid may still be underactive. According to these practitioners, a low dose of thyroid hormone may safely reduce or eliminate symptoms in many patients. Since these practitioners have found that a low dose of thyroid hormone is safe for most of their patients, their philosophy is that they owe it to symptomatic patients to conduct such a trial.

      If you have hypothyroidism symptoms or risk factors – family history, neck trauma, radiation exposure to the neck, cigarette smoking are just a few – be sure to have a thorough evaluation by a practitioner who not only understands thyroid disease, but recognizes that thyroid patients are more than just numbers on a lab test, and puts that into practice.

      (March 2006)

      GOOD LUCK! :)

  44. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have a thyroid problem and if so please describe?
    My thyroid levels alternate between being low and high, I believe at the moment my thyroid is hyperactive because I sweat all the time, I get headaches etc, I take thyroxine supplements 200 micrograms, however I believe it's making my thyroid worse, I did have Hashimoto's Disease, can anybody reccommend anything to me about getting this thyroid problem fixed long term wise.

    • ANSWER:
      You said that you DID have Hashi's ... there is no cure & it sounds like now that that is what you have. The 200mcg may be too high making you meds induced HypER (HypER should have stopped happening w/ the start of the meds). Are you being regularly retested to see if you need a change in dose? If not, you need a new doctor!

      Here is info for you & good links:
      You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid from beginning).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
      http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

      ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

      God bless you

  45. QUESTION:
    What were your hypothyroidism symptoms?
    I know what websites like Web MD and Mayo Clinic say about the typical symptoms, but I was wondering if anyone has any details about their specific process of experiencing symptoms & getting diagnosed?

    • ANSWER:
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.

      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.

      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      Have you had your thyroid tested? You need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

  46. QUESTION:
    Is there anything specific about Hashimoto's thyroiditis ?
    Apart from it being a hypothyrodism condition.

    I am asking specifically in clinical testing of the disease, it is likely that all suspected hypothyroidism will have TSH and free T4 and T3 level measured, but a low concentration of the T's and elevated TSH will just point towards a confirmed diagnosis on hypothyroidism, without specifically indicating it to be Hashimoto's

    Any knowledge or explanation appreciated.

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      If I am understanding correctly, you are asking how garden variety hypothyroidism is differentiated from the Hashimoto's thyroiditis variety.

      Hashimoto's thyroiiditis patients have elevated anti-thyroid antibodies . This is important to confirm in cases of primary hypothyroidism because general hypothyroidism may require only short term supplementation of thyroid and because Hashimoto's variety requires some dose of thyroid and follow up FOR A LIFETIME.

      This is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in North America and used to be felt to be rare. There is excellent information at:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashimoto%27s_thyroiditis

      Managed by an endocrinologist, these patients do well. Managed poorly by a physician who does not understand this disorder, they may not. Best wishes.

  47. QUESTION:
    What are the causes and symptoms of thyroid infection and how can it be countered?

    • ANSWER:
      Thyroiditis

      Inflammation of the Thyroid Gland

      Thyroiditis is an inflammation (not an infection) of the thyroid gland. Several types of thyroiditis exist and the treatment is different for each.

      Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis (also called autoimmune or chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis) is the most common type of thyroiditis. It is named after the Japanese physician, Hakaru Hashimoto, that first described it in 1912. The thyroid gland is always enlarged, although only one side may be enlarged enough to feel. During the course of this disease, the cells of the thyroid becomes inefficient in converting iodine into thyroid hormone and "compensates" by enlarging (for a review of this process see our function page). The radioactive iodine uptake may be paradoxically high while the patient is hypothyroid because the gland retains the ability to take-up or "trap" iodine even after it has lost its ability to produce thyroid hormone. As the disease progresses, the TSH increases since the pituitary is trying to induce the thyroid to make more hormone, the T4 falls since the thyroid can't make it, and the patient becomes hypothyroid. The sequence of events can occur over a relatively short span of a few weeks or may take several years.

      Treatment is to start thyroid hormone replacement. This prevents or corrects the hypothyroidism and it also generally keeps the gland from getting larger.

      In most cases the thyroid gland will decrease in size once thyroid hormone replacement is started.

      Thyroid antibodies are present in 95% of patients with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and serve as a useful "marker" in identifying the disease without thyroid biopsy or surgery.

      Thyroid antibodies may remain for years after the disease has been adequately treated and the patient is on thyroid hormone replacement.

      De Quervain's Thyroiditis. De Quervain's Thyroiditis (also called subacute or granulomatous thyroiditis) was first described in 1904 and is much less common than Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. The thyroid gland generally swells rapidly and is very painful and tender. The gland discharges thyroid hormone into the blood and the patients become hyperthyroid; however the gland quits taking up iodine (radioactive iodine uptake is very low) and the hyperthyroidism generally resolves over the next several weeks.

      Patients frequently become ill with fever and prefer to be in bed.

      Thyroid antibodies are not present in the blood, but the sedimentation rate, which measures inflammation, is very high.

      Although this type of thyroiditis resembles an infection within the thyroid gland, no infectious agent has ever been identified and antibiotics are of no use.

      Treatment is usually bed rest and aspirin to reduce inflammation.

      Occasionally cortisone (steroids) (to reduce inflammation) and thyroid hormone (to "rest" the thyroid gland) may be used in prolonged cases.

      Nearly all patients recover and the thyroid gland returns to normal after several weeks or months.

      A few patients will become hypothyroid once the inflammation settles down and therefore will need to stay on thyroid hormone replacement indefinitely.

      Recurrences are uncommon.

      Silent Thyroiditis. Silent Thyroiditis is the third and least common type of thyroiditis. It was not recognized until the 1970's although it probably existed and was treated as Graves' Disease before that. This type of thyroiditis resembles in part Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and in part De Quervain's Thyroiditis. The blood thyroid test are high and the radioactive iodine uptake is low (like De Quervain's Thyroiditis), but there is no pain and needle biopsy resembles Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. The majority of patients have been young women following pregnancy. The disease usually needs no treatment and 80% of patients show complete recovery and return of the thyroid gland to normal after three months. Symptoms are similar to Graves' Disease except milder. The thyroid gland is only slightly enlarged and exophthalmos (development of "bug eyes") does not occur. Treatment is usually bed rest with beta blockers to control palpitations (drugs to prevent rapid heart rates). Radioactive iodine, surgery, or antithyroid medication is never needed. A few patients have become permanently hypothyroid and needed to be placed on thyroid hormone

  48. QUESTION:
    Hypothyroidism the reason for my dry hair and cold hands?
    I have had this for about 6 years. I can never get my hands to warm up. Is this why?
    I take synthroid and my last TSH levels were good.

    • ANSWER:
      Not necessarly. A low RBC (red bloodcell count) or low iron (anemia) may be the cause. Don't rule out hypothyroidism though. the same blood test that can check for the blood count, can also check your TSH (Thyroid stimulating hormone). It's really easy, so don't put it off.

  49. QUESTION:
    hipo thyroid is what my wife has, can somebody help me?
    She takes levo thyroxine but steel she is often depressed, sleeps way to much mood changes and alwise fatige. Does any body knows natural remedies, or food - fruits to fight this?

    • ANSWER:
      Skep Doc is partially right, but missing some of the details. Hypothyroidism is by definition a condition where the body's metabolism that is controlled by the thyroid, too low. There are many symptoms that doctors look for and since they treat symptoms rather than "root causes," generally prescribe a synthetic or natural hormone treatment to supply the body with the hormone that the thyroid gland is not producing enough of. This does not solve the problem, but acts like a band aid that causes the thyroid to slow down and even stop producing it's own hormone and then relys on the drug instead. This is a life long sentence of taking the drugs instead of fixing the problem that is causing the thyroid to not function properly. There have been about 3 progressively produced ideas as to the cause of this problem. The first one was that the body is deficient in iodine. Most Americans today are deficient in iodine, contrary to what some have said here. There is a very simple test to see if that is the case with you. Just buy a small bottle of "tincture of iodine" from your local legal drug pusher store (pharmacy) and paint a 2" x 3" patch on your forearm or on your chest. Note the time of day. Note the time of day when you do not see the patch anymore. If you are NOT deficient in iodine, the patch will still be visible in 24 hours. If you take a shower, don't use soap on the area, it will skew the test.

      If you are deficient in iodine, you can correct that before running out and getting medication. It takes a few months to get your body built up with the iodine. Fluoride is the main culprit in depleting the body of Iodine. Eliminate ALL fluoride from your body, including tooth pastes, water containing that garbage, sodas, beer, etc. Your thyroid only uses about 4% of the iodine you take in. If you are deficient, your whole body will benefit by getting rid of that deficiency.

      The hypothalamus gland is responsible for monitoring the feed back loop from the thyroid to determine your metabolic rate. If it sees that there is not enough T3 and T4 hormone in your blood, it will send a hormone to your pituitary to send a hormone called TSH to your thyroid to produce more T3 and T4. The T4 hormone must be converted to the T3 hormone that is 4 times more active than the T4 to up regulate the metabolism of your cells. The T4 hormone is made up of 3 parts iodine and 1 part Tyrosine amino acid. The T3 is created when the T4 gives up the iodine molecule using Rubidium to do this. These cofactors are critical to make this all happen.

      There is a disease called "Wilson's" disease that is a result of the body not being able to easily convert the T4 hormones to T3. In this disease, your TSH levels will appear normal, but your thyroid will not be working correctly.

      The second thing that was discovered is that it was thought that there was an autoimmune issue causing the thyroid tissue to be attacked. This is actually a result of infection. The body doesn't attack itself, but in an effort to get rid of the infection, some tissues are destroyed in the process and this is labeled autoimmune. Drugs, like antibiotics drive the germs deep into tissues and the body's immune system is persistent.

      The third issue is the adrenal glands being exhausted can cause the thyroid gland to be compromised and not function well. The thyroid is part of an endocrine system that is a system of complex relationships and to address one organ in this system, without addressing the other organs will simply not work in an overall health regimen. This is why simply giving a synthroid drug to solve this issue is not the answer, but only a band aid, leaving the root cause to create other problems.

      There are natural remedies to fight this. I used to have a thyroid problem and was on synthroid. I have been off it now for over 1 and 1/2 years and no more symptoms. The solution is a combination of things, but it can happen. You have to make your whole body healthy in the process. It does work, I'm living proof.

      It sounds like your wife has several issues that could be contributing to her symptoms. But again, to just treat the symptoms would not be the best route typically. You need to get to the root cause of her problems. I suggest that she go to a Certified Nutritional Therapist that can test her for specific nutritional deficiencies and create a good diet plan and supplementation that is geared to her specific issues and not a bunch of guess work.

      good luck

  50. QUESTION:
    what are the symptoms of thyroid disease?
    how can one find out if she/he has thyroid disease?

    • ANSWER:
      Well here are some...............
      Low energy and fatigue or tiredness, especially in the morning, difficulty losing weight, a sensation of coldness--especially of the hands and feet, depression, slowness of thought processes, headaches, swelling of the face or fluid retention in general, dry coarse skin, brittle nails, stiffness of joints, muscular cramps, shortness of breath on exertion, and chest pain, and chronic constipation are common. In women, menstrual problems--such as PMS and menstrual irregularities including heavy periods and fertility problems are further signs and symptoms. Disorders associated with hypothyroidism include headaches, migraines, sinus infections, post-nasal drip, visual disturbances, frequent respiratory infections, difficulty swallowing, heart palpitations, indigestion, gas, flatulence, constipation, diarrhea, frequent bladder infections, infertility, reduced libido and sleep disturbances, with the person requiring 12 or more hours of sleep at times. Other conditions include intolerance to cold, poor circulation, Raynaud's Syndrome, which involves the hands and feet turning white in response to cold, allergies, asthma, heart problems, benign and malignant tumors, cystic breasts and ovaries, fibroids, dry skin, acne, fluid retention, loss of memory, depression, mood swings, fears, and joint and muscle pain.

      The hair tends to be dry, brittle and thinning. The outer third of the eyebrows is often missing. One often finds swelling under the eyes. The tongue is often thick and swollen. The skin may be rough, dry and flaky and show evidence of acne. The skin may also have a yellowish tinge due to high carotene in it. Nails tend to be brittle and break easily. The thyroid gland may be enlarged. The patient is more often overweight. Hands and feet are frequently cold to the touch. Reflexes are either slow or absent. The pulse rate is often slow.

      The average temperature is below 97.8 Fahrenheit.

      For second question - you have to find a doctor that is knowledgeable about the thyroid...this is not easy.

      WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

      You need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (...OR Graves Disease - HypERthyroid).

      Ck these:
      http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
      http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
      http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

      God bless

causes of low tsh in hypothyroidism